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Making Rounds with Oscar: The Extraordinary Gift of an Ordinary Cat

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **A remarkable cat. A special gift. A life-changing journey.** They thought he was just a cat. When Oscar arrived at the Steere House Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rhode Island he was a cute little guy with attitude. He loved to stretch out in a puddle of sunlight and chase his tail until he was dizzy. Occasionally he consented to a scratch behind the ears, but only when it suited him. In other words, he was a typical cat. Or so it seemed. It wasn’t long before Oscar had created something of a stir. Apparently, this ordinary cat possesses an extraordinary gift: he knows instinctively when the end of life is near. Oscar is a welcome distraction for the residents of Steere House, many of whom are living with Alzheimer’s. But he never spends much time with them–until they are in their last hours. Then, as if this were his job, Oscar strides purposely into a patient’s room, curls up on the bed, and begins his vigil. Oscar provides comfort and companionship when people need him most. And his presence lets caregivers and loved ones know that it’s time to say good-bye. Oscar’s gift is a tender mercy. He teaches by example: embracing moments of life that so many of us shy away from. *Making Rounds with Oscar* is the story of an unusual cat, the patients he serves, their caregivers, and of one doctor who learned how to listen. Heartfelt, inspiring, and full of humor and pathos, this book allows readers to take a walk into a world rarely seen from the outside, a world we often misunderstand. **Praise for *Making Rounds With Oscar*** “I love this book — Oscar has much to teach us about empathy and courage. I couldn’t put it down.” -Sarah Gruen, author of *Water for Elephants* “At its heart, Dosa’s search is more about how people cope with death than Oscar’s purported ability to predict it.” -*The Associated Press* “Beautifully written, heartwarming […] Told with profound insight and great respect for all involved, this is more than just a cat story (although it will appeal to fans of Vicki Myron’s Dewey).” -*Library Journal* “You’ll be moved.” -*People*

Make Your Move

Make Your Move (Harlequin Blaze Series #542) by Samantha Hunter
Jodie Patterson’s posh bakery is all about satisfying cravings. Her signature aphrodisiac cookies have been flying off the shelves…and giving Jodie some delicious ideas of her own.
Behind his owlish glasses, Jodie’s business partner, Dr. Dan Ellison, is the male equivalent of the Naughty Professor. Jodie is more than ready to indulge her fantasies with this wolf-in-geek’s-clothing as long as they set some ground rules: sex is sex, business is business and nothing will change. Yeah, right! After that first addictive kiss, it’s time to see if they can *really *satisfy each other’s appetites….

Magic terror: seven tales

Amazon.com Review

Peter Straub is a fine sorcerer of horror whose bag of tricks includes stories of pure, unadulterated horror ( and ), as well as more subtle tales of psychological suspense ( and ). Now Straub conjures up Magic Terror, a collection of seven deeply disturbing tales that display his entire range.

“Bunny Is Good Bread” is without a doubt the most haunted tale of all, a harrowing account of a childhood from hell. The scary hero Fee was so traumatized as a 5-year-old by abuse from his father that he disconnects himself from the real world and lives as if in a film. Why? “If you forgot you were in a movie, your own feelings would tear you into bloody rags.” Ever since the day Fee watches his mother die a horrible death, he’s been tormented: “He was one-half dead himself; half of him belonged to his dead mother.”

Fee is not the only character to be struck by a dark epiphany, a life-changing moment. In the lyrical “Porkpie Hat,” a famous jazz musician recounts the ghoulish Halloween encounter that charted the course of his destiny, and in the twisted fairy tale “Ashputtle,” a fantasy-inclined “princess” seeks retribution for a traumatic incident many years before.

In Straub’s world, horror appears in different disguises–the dark mask of child abuse and the bloodied cloak of war (“The Ghost Village”). Regardless of how it shows itself, the effects will haunt long after lights out. –Naomi Gesinger

From Publishers Weekly

The war-numbed soldier who asks, “Just suppose…,that you were forced to confront extreme experience directly, without any mediation?” speaks for all of the spiritually traumatized souls who navigate the harrowingly rendered hells of these seven tales of suspense and horror. Straub (Mr. X) effortlessly plumbs the hearts and minds of a range of well-developed charactersAincluding a reflective assassin for hire, a five-year-old victim of domestic violence, an aging black jazz musician and a pompous Wall Street financial adviserAto locate epiphanic moments when their lives careened “out of the ordinary” and into the path of deforming private tragedy. In “Ashputtle,” an implied murderess blames her crimes on an emotionally deprived childhood in which she imagines herself a modern Cinderella victimized by her cruel stepsisters. “Bunny Is Good Bread,” an unnerving portrait of the psychopath as a young boy, follows young Fee Bandolier as he maladjusts to an unbearably gothic home situation in which his father has beaten his mother into a coma. “Porkpie Hat” is related as an alcoholic saxophonist’s confession of a childhood brush with witchcraft, murder and miscegenation that continues to inform his blues-haunted music. In several of the talesAmost notably “The Haunted Village,” which links to the novel Koko (1988) and stories from his previous collection, Houses Without Doors (1990)AStraub skillfully evokes the supernatural to suggest the dislocating effect of intense psychological upset. Mixing stark realism with black comedy, and reverberating with echoes of Conrad, Melville and the Brothers Grimm, these excursions to the dark side of life set a high standard for the literature of contemporary magic terror. (July)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Magic Seeds

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Willie Chandran is a man who has allowed one identity after another to be thrust upon him. In his early forties, after a peripatetic life, he succumbs to the encouragement of his sister – and his own listlessness – and joins an underground movement in India. But years of revolutionary campaigns and then prison convince him that the revolution ‘had nothing to do with what we were fighting for’, and he feels himself further than ever ‘from his own history’.
When he returns to Britain where, thirty years before, his wanderings began, Willie encounters a country that has turned its back on its past and, like him, has become detached from its own history. He endures the indignities of a culture dissipated by reform and compromise until, in a moment of grotesque revelation – a tour de force of parodic savagery from our most visionary of writers – Willie comes to an understanding that might finally allow him to release his true self.
This book is the second volume of Half A Life, but can be read alone.

Magic on the Storm

SUMMARY: Allison Beckstrom is committed to her work tracing illegal spells. Now, there’s an apocalyptic storm bearing down on Portland, and when it hits, all the magic in the area will turn unstable and destructive. To stop it from taking out the entire city, Allie and her lover, the mysterious Zayvion Jones, must work with the Authority-the enigmatic arbiters of all things magic-and take a stand against a magical wildstorm that will obliterate all in its path…

Magic in the Shadows

SUMMARY: Allison Beckstrom’s magic has taken its toll on her, physically marking her and erasing her memories — including those of the man she supposedly loves. But lost memories aren’t the only things preying on Allie’s thoughts. Her late father, the prominent businessman — and sorcerer — Daniel Beckstrom, has somehow channeled himself into her very mind. With the help of The Authority, a secret organization of magic users, she hopes to gain better control over her own abilities — and find a way to deal with her father.

Made of Honor

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **Once, twice, ten times a bridesmaid!** I, Dana Rose, do solemnly swear to say “I won’t” the next time someone asks me to be in their wedding party. My weak will has gained me a closet full of unflattering bridesmaids’ dresses in various sizes to accommodate my ever-fluctuating waistline. As if that isn’t enough, the past is paying me a most unwelcome visit (my prodigal brother, my back-stabbing sis). Then there’s Mr. Practically Perfect, the ex who not only married someone else, but opened the business of *our* dreams — right across from my new shop! It’s no wonder I’ve got problems! I’m thankful I’ve got my friends, the Sassy Sisterhood, to rely on . . . **The Sassy Sisterhood: They get by with a little help from their friends.**

Madame Bovary: Provincial Ways

A literary event: one of the world’s most celebrated novels, in a magnificent new translation Seven years ago, Lydia Davis brought us an award-winning, rapturously reviewed new translation of Marcel Proust’s Swann’s Way that was hailed as “clear and true to the music of the original” (Los Angeles Times) and “a work of creation in its own right” (Claire Messud, Newsday). Now she turns her gifts to the book that redefined the novel as an art form. Emma Bovary is the original desperate housewife. Beautiful but bored, she is married to the provincial doctor Charles Bovary yet harbors dreams of an elegant and passionate life. Escaping into sentimental novels, she finds her fantasies dashed by the tedium of her days. Motherhood proves to be a burden; religion is only a brief distraction. In an effort to make her life everything she believes it should be, she spends lavishly on clothes and on her home and embarks on two disappointing affairs. Soon heartbroken and crippled by debts, Emma takes drastic action with tragic consequences for her husband and daughter. When published in 1857, Madame Bovary was deemed so lifelike that many women claimed they were the model for its heroine. Today the novel is considered the first masterpiece of realist fiction. Flaubert sought to tell the story objectively, without romanticizing or moralizing (hence the uproar surrounding its publication), but whereas he was famously fastidious about his literary style, many of the English versions seem to tell the story in their own style. In this landmark translation, Lydia Davis honors the nuances and particulars of a style that has long beguiled readers of French, giving new life in English to Flaubert’s masterwork.

Mad Enough to Marry

TRULY, MADLY, DEEPLY Long, lean Logan Chase was dangerous to Elena O’Brien. Which was why she had to be mad to consider his offer of shelter. Yes, she needed a temporary home while hers was renovated, but live with Logan, the man she once dreamed of loving forever? That is, until he broke her heart…. Okay, so Logan had a lot to make up for. After all, as a restless, brooding young man, he’d left Elena high and dry–and on prom night, of all nights! But opening his home to her now was surely insane. Because suddenly he was sharing cozy meals–and even cozier kisses–with Elena. Once he took this innocent beauty to his bed, would this confirmed bachelor be mad enough to…to marry?

(source: Bol.com)

The Machine Crusade

The exciting sequel to the New York Times bestseller, Dune: The Butlerian Jihad.

Macbeth

Macbeth (Saddleback’s Illustrated Classics Series) by William Shakespeare
Theme: Hi-Lo, graphic novels, illustrated, Shakespeare, classics. After encountering three witches, the warrior Macbeth waits to see if their predictions come true. Stung by ambition, Macbeth is persuaded by his conniving wife that the fastest way to fulfill the prophecy is to murder the king, which sets off a disastrous chain of events. As the tragedy unfolds, Macbeth’s decisions lead to more ruin. He returns to the witches and believes that his future is secure but is he interpreting the premonitions correctly? This series features classic Shakespeare retold with graphic color illustrations. Educators using the Dale-Chall vocabulary system adapted each title. Each 64-page, eBook retains key phrases and quotations from the original play. Research shows that the more students read, the better their vocabulary, their ability to read, and their knowledge of the world.

Mac OS X for Unix Geeks

If you’re one of the many Unix developers drawn to Mac OS X for its BSD core, you’ll find yourself in surprisingly unfamiliar territory. Even if you’re an experienced Mac user, Mac OS X is unlike earlier Macs, and it’s radically different from the Unix you’ve used before, too.Enter ”Mac OS X for Unix Geeks” by Brian Jepson and Ernest E. Rothman, two Unix geeks who found themselves in the same place you are. Their new book is your guide to figuring out the BSD Unix system and Mac-specific components that are making your life difficult and to help ease you into the Unix inside Mac OS X. This concise book includes such topics as:
* A quick overview of the Terminal application
* Understanding Open Directory (LDAP) and NetInfo
* Issues related to using the GNU C Compiler 9GCC
* Library linking and porting Unix software
* An overview of Mac OS X?s filesystem and startup processes
* Creating and installing packages using Fink
* Building the Darwin kernel
* Running X Windows on top of Mac OS X
The book wraps up with a quick manpage-style reference to the ”Missing Manual Pages”–commands that come with Mac OS X although there are no manpages.If you find yourself disoriented by the new Mac environment, Mac OS X for Unix Geeks can help you acclimate yourself quickly to the familiar, yet foreign, Unix landscape.
(source: Bol.com)

Lysis

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.
This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.
As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
**

Lyra’s Oxford

SUMMARY: An exciting new tale set in the world of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials saga. This collectible hardcover volume includes a short story by Mr. Pullman, plus a fold-out map of Oxford and various “souvenirs” from the past. The book is illustrated throughout with woodcut illustrations by John Lawrence.From the Hardcover edition.

Luka and the Fire of Life

With the same dazzling imagination and love of language that have made Salman Rushdie one of the great storytellers of our time, *Luka and the Fire of Life* revisits the magic-infused, intricate world he first brought to life in the modern classic *Haroun and the Sea of Stories.* This breathtaking new novel centers on Luka, Haroun’s younger brother, who must save his father from certain doom.
For Rashid Khalifa, the legendary storyteller of Kahani, has fallen into deep sleep from which no one can wake him. To keep his father from slipping away entirely, Luka must travel to the Magic World and steal the ever-burning Fire of Life. Thus begins a quest replete with unlikely creatures, strange alliances, and seemingly insurmountable challenges as Luka and an assortment of enchanted companions race through peril after peril, pass through the land of the Badly Behaved Gods, and reach the Fire itself, where Luka’s fate, and that of his father, will be decided.
Filled with mischievous wordplay and delving into themes as universal as the power of filial love and the meaning of mortality,* Luka and the Fire of Life* is a book of wonders for all ages.
**

Lucrezia Borgia: life, love and death in Renaissance Italy

From Publishers Weekly

Lucrezia Borgia is legendary as the archetypal villainess who carried out the poisoning plotted by her scheming father—Pope Alexander VI, aka Rodrigo Borgia—and by her ruthlessly ambitious brother Cesare. The facts of Lucrezia’s case are sorted out from fiction by Bradford’s humanizing biography, which presents Lucrezia as an intelligent noblewoman, powerless to defy her family’s patriarchal order, yet an enlightened ruler in her own right as Duchess of Ferrara. Drawing on extensive archival evidence, Bradford (_Disraeli_; Princess Grace) explains how Lucrezia’s first husband, after their marriage was annulled, vengefully tarnished her name with accusations of incest. Bradford discredits the popular belief that Lucrezia helped Cesare assassinate her second husband. Lucrezia emerges as a political realist who participated with her father and brother in a campaign to marry into the powerful Este family, winning the affections of her new husband, Alfonso d’Este, later Duke of Ferrara. Bradford portrays Lucrezia’s extramarital affairs as daring and passionate romances of the heart and describes her cultivated court life and her kindness to artists and poets. Although Bradford’s portrait is not immune to a fictionalizing style, especially when ascribing emotional states to its subject, as a project designed to distinguish the historical Lucrezia Borgia from the legend, Bradford’s readable biography resoundingly succeeds. Maps and illus. not seen by PW.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From

Historians who have attempted to rescue Lucrezia Borgia from her legend as a poisoner who slept with both her father, Pope Alexander VI, and her brother, Cesare Borgia, have mostly described her as a pawn. Indeed, before she was twenty-one she was twice married off to men who were disposed of once their political usefulness expired. (The first had to declare himself impotent and grant her a divorce; the second was strangled in his bed.) Bradford sees Lucrezia neither as a helpless victim nor a femme fatale but as a resourceful individual—an able administrator, a genuinely religious woman, and the equal in political skill, if not in brutality, of her notorious male relatives. When the family of her third husband balked at alliance with a woman described as the “greatest whore there ever was in Rome,” she used all her craft and charm to win them over—by, among other things, making her pious prospective father-in-law a gift of several nuns.
Copyright © 2005