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Impossible

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When a high-powered gallery owner collides with a wildly offbeat artist, it’s the perfect recipe for disaster. But in her 63rd bestselling novel, Danielle Steel proves that when two hopelessly mismatched people share a love for art, a passion for each other, and a city like Paris, nothing is truly impossible…or is it?
Everything Sasha does is within the boundaries of tradition. Liam is sockless in December. Sasha is widowed, a woman who knows she was lucky enough to be married to the most wonderful man in the world and thankful for every moment they had. Liam is half in and half out of a marriage that only a “wacky” artist could manage, and that his own impossibly impulsive behavior has helped tear apart. But while Sasha has been methodically building her father’s Parisian art gallery into an intercontinental success story, Liam has been growing into one of the most original and striking young painters of his time. So while the two are utterly unalike-–and a nine-year age difference stares them squarely in the face-–the miracle of art brings them crashing together. Now the question is, can Sasha guard her reputation while juggling a secret, somewhat scandalous relationship? And how can Liam, who lives for the moment, put up with a woman who insists on having things her own way, in her own style, and at her own time?
For Sasha, it’s a matter of keeping Liam hidden from her grown children and well-heeled clientele as she commutes between New York and Paris and two thriving galleries. For Liam, it’s about creating chaos out of order, bringing out the wild streak that Sasha barely knows she has, of choosing pizza over foie gras, and making love when others are busy making money. That is, until a family tragedy suddenly alters Liam’s life–-and forces a choice and a sacrifice that neither one of them could have expected. But from the snow falling on the Tuileries to the joy of eating ice cream by candlelight, the artist and the art dealer have tasted perfection. And giving up now might just be the most impossible thing of all.
With unerring insight into the hearts of men and women–-and into the soul of the artist-–Danielle Steel takes us into a world of glamour and genius, priceless art and dazzling creativity. From the luxurious galleries of Europe to the endless beaches of the Hamptons, *Impossible* weaves an extraordinary tale of love and compromise, of taking chances and counting blessings. With brilliant color and breathtaking emotion, Danielle Steel has written her most compelling novel to date.
*From the Hardcover edition.*

Impact

SUMMARY: Wyman Ford is tapped for a secret expedition to Cambodia… to locate the source of strangely beautiful gemstones that do not appear to be of this world. A brilliant meteor lights up the Maine coast…and two young women borrow a boat and set out for a distant island to find the impact crater. A scientist at the National Propulsion Facility discovers an inexplicable source of gamma rays in the outer Solar System. He is found decapitated, the data missing. High resolution NASA images reveal an unnatural feature hidden in the depths of a crater on Mars…and it appears to have been activated. Sixty hours and counting.

Immortal Wolf

*With taut suspense, smoldering eroticism and dark magick, Bonnie Vanak weaves a spellbinding tale of two powerful beings united in a race against death….*
Exiled to a life of extreme loneliness because everyone she touches dies, Emily Burke has every reason to distrust Raphael Robichaux. The immortal werewolf possesses immense power and has been summoned by her pack to end her life. And yet, from the moment she lays eyes on the powerful rebel, he awakens all the longings she’s kept bottled inside…and gives her hope.
When Raphael meets Emily, he knows something enormous is at stake. For not only does he see that her blood can restore life – but she is his destined mate.
Trust doesn’t come easily to Emily. But somehow Raphael must convince her to put her life in his hands. Only then will an ancient prophecy be fulfilled and a terrible evil destroyed….

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Amazon.com Review

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks a fascinating and moving story of medicine and family, of how life is sustained in laboratories and in memory. Henrietta Lacks was a mother of five in Baltimore, a poor African American migrant from the tobacco farms of Virginia, who died from a cruelly aggressive cancer at the age of 30 in 1951. A sample of her cancerous tissue, taken without her knowledge or consent, as was the custom then, turned out to provide one of the holy grails of mid-century biology: human cells that could survive–even thrive–in the lab. Known as HeLa cells, their stunning potency gave scientists a building block for countless breakthroughs, beginning with the cure for polio. Meanwhile, Henrietta’s family continued to live in poverty and frequently poor health, and their discovery decades later of her unknowing contribution–and her cells’ strange survival–left them full of pride, anger, and suspicion. For a decade, Skloot doggedly but compassionately gathered the threads of these stories, slowly gaining the trust of the family while helping them learn the truth about Henrietta, and with their aid she tells a rich and haunting story that asks the questions, Who owns our bodies? And who carries our memories? –_Tom Nissley

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Amazon Exclusive: Jad Abumrad Reviews The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Jad Abumrad is host and creator of the public radio hit Radiolab, now in its seventh season and reaching over a million people monthly. Radiolab combines cutting-edge production with a philosophical approach to big ideas in science and beyond, and an inventive method of storytelling. Abumrad has won numerous awards, including a National Headliner Award in Radio and an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science Journalism Award. Read his exclusive Amazon guest review of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks:

Honestly, I can’t imagine a better tale.

A detective story that’s at once mythically large and painfully intimate.

Just the simple facts are hard to believe: that in 1951, a poor black woman named Henrietta Lacks dies of cervical cancer, but pieces of the tumor that killed her–taken without her knowledge or consent–live on, first in one lab, then in hundreds, then thousands, then in giant factories churning out polio vaccines, then aboard rocket ships launched into space. The cells from this one tumor would spawn a multi-billion dollar industry and become a foundation of modern science–leading to breakthroughs in gene mapping, cloning and fertility and helping to discover how viruses work and how cancer develops (among a million other things). All of which is to say: the science end of this story is enough to blow one’s mind right out of one’s face.

But what’s truly remarkable about

The book ultimately channels its journey of discovery though Henrietta’s youngest daughter, Deborah, who never knew her mother, and who dreamt of one day being a scientist.

As Deborah Lacks and Skloot search for answers, we’re bounced effortlessly from the tiny tobacco-farming Virginia hamlet of Henrietta’s childhood to modern-day Baltimore, where Henrietta’s family remains. Along the way, a series of unforgettable juxtapositions: cell culturing bumps into faith healings, cutting edge medicine collides with the dark truth that Henrietta’s family can’t afford the health insurance to care for diseases their mother’s cells have helped to cure.

Rebecca Skloot tells the story with great sensitivity, urgency and, in the end, damn fine writing. I highly recommend this book. –Jad Abumrad


Look Inside The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Click on thumbnails for larger images


Henrietta and David Lacks, circa 1945. Elsie Lacks, Henrietta’s older daughter, about five years before she was committed to Crownsville State Hospital, with a diagnosis of “idiocy.” Deborah Lacks at about age four. The home-house where Henrietta was raised, a four-room log cabin in Clover, Virginia, that once served as slave quarters. (1999) Main Street in downtown Clover, Virginia, where Henrietta was raised, circa 1930s.


Margaret Gey and Minnie, a lab technician, in the Gey lab at Hopkins, circa 1951. Deborah with her children, LaTonya and Alfred, and her second husband, James Pullum, in the mid-1980s. In 2001, Deborah developed a severe case of hives after learning upsetting new information about her mother and sister. Deborah and her cousin Gary Lacks standing in front of drying tobacco, 2001. The Lacks family in 2009.


From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Science journalist Skloot makes a remarkable debut with this multilayered story about faith, science, journalism, and grace. It is also a tale of medical wonders and medical arrogance, racism, poverty and the bond that grows, sometimes painfully, between two very different women—Skloot and Deborah Lacks—sharing an obsession to learn about Deborah’s mother, Henrietta, and her magical, immortal cells. Henrietta Lacks was a 31-year-old black mother of five in Baltimore when she died of cervical cancer in 1951. Without her knowledge, doctors treating her at Johns Hopkins took tissue samples from her cervix for research. They spawned the first viable, indeed miraculously productive, cell line—known as HeLa. These cells have aided in medical discoveries from the polio vaccine to AIDS treatments. What Skloot so poignantly portrays is the devastating impact Henrietta’s death and the eventual importance of her cells had on her husband and children. Skloot’s portraits of Deborah, her father and brothers are so vibrant and immediate they recall Adrian Nicole LeBlanc’s Random Family. Writing in plain, clear prose, Skloot avoids melodrama and makes no judgments. Letting people and events speak for themselves, Skloot tells a rich, resonant tale of modern science, the wonders it can perform and how easily it can exploit society’s most vulnerable people. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Imajica I: The Fifth Dominion

SUMMARY: The magical tale of ill-fated lovers lost among worlds teetering on the edge of destruction, where their passion holds the key to escape. There has never been a book like Imajica. Transforming every expectation offantasy fiction with its heady mingling of radical sexuality and spiritual anarchy, it has carried its millions of readers into regions of passion and philosophy that few books have even attempted to map. It’s an epic in everyway; vast in conception, obsessively detailed in execution, and apocalyptic in its resolution. A book of erotic mysteries and perverse violence. A book of ancient, mythological landscapes and even more ancient magic.

Ilustrado

SUMMARY: Garnering international prizes and acclaim before its publication, “Ilustrado” has been called “brilliantly conceived and stylishly executed . . .It is also ceaselessly entertaining, frequently raunchy, and effervescent with humor” (2008 Man Asian Literary Prize panel of judges). It begins with a body. On a clear day in winter, the battered corpse of Crispin Salvador is pulled from the Hudson River–taken from the world is the controversial lion of Philippine literature. Gone, too, is the only manuscript of his final book, a work meant to rescue him from obscurity by exposing the crimes of the Filipino ruling families. Miguel, his student and only remaining friend, sets out for Manila to investigate. To understand the death, Miguel scours the life, piecing together Salvador’s story through his poetry, interviews, novels, polemics, and memoirs. The result is a rich and dramatic family saga of four generations, tracing 150 years of Philippine history forged under the Spanish, the Americans, and the Filipinos themselves. Finally, we are surprised to learn that this story belongs to young Miguel as much as to his lost mentor, and we are treated to an unhindered view of a society caught between reckless decay and hopeful progress. Exuberant and wise, wildly funny and deeply moving, “Ilustrado” explores the hidden truths that haunt every family. It is a daring and inventive debut by a new writer of astonishing talent. Miguel Syjuco received the 2008 Man Asian Literary Prize and the Philippines’ highest literary honor, the Palanca Award, for the unpublished manuscript of “Ilustrado.” Born and raised in Manila, he currently lives in Montreal. Tracing 150 years of Philippine history forged under the Spanish, the Americans and the Filipinos themselves, Miguel, the student and only remaining friend of Crispin Salvador, sets out for Manila to investigate Salvador’s death. On a clear day in winter, the battered corpse of Crispin Salvador is pulled from the Hudson River and the only manuscript of his final book–a work meant to rescue him from obscurity by exposing the crimes of the Filipino ruling families–is lost. To understand the death, Miguel scours Salvador’s former life in the Philippines, piecing together his story through his poetry, interviews, novels, polemics and memoirs. To his own surprise, the young Miguel learns this story belongs to him as much as to his lost mentor, as he and the reader are treated to an unhindered view of a society caught between reckless decay and hopeful progress. Exuberant and wise, wildly funny and deeply moving, “Ilustrado” explores the hidden truths that haunt every family. “Ambitious . . . In a daring literary performance, Syjuco weaves the invented with the factual . . . “Ilustrado” is being presented as a tracing of 150 years of Philippine history, but it’s considerably more than that . . . Spiced with surprises and leavened with uproariously funny moments, it is punctuated with serious philosophical musings.” –Raymond Bonner, “The New York Times Book Review “”A dazzling and virtuosic adventure in reading . . . The narrative is organised with immense confidence and skill . . . The author’s post-modernist bag of tricks also contains a whip-crack narrative skill that’s as reminiscent of Dickens as it is of Roberto Bolano . . . There’s a capaciousness that makes the book richly attractive to wander into . . . [This] novel . . . fizzes with the effervescence a large book can have when its author is in total control of the material. This isn’t a story; it’s the unfolding of an entire world, a mirror-land that seems familiar but is always ineffably strange . . . Syjuco is a writer already touched by greatness . . . This is a remarkably impressive and utterly persuasive novel. Its author . . . may one day succeed with the Nobel committee.”–Joseph O’Connor, “The Guardian” (UK) “An exuberant, complex, and fascinating ride through 150 years of Philippine history . . . Syjuco’s writing is playful, smart, and confident . . . An inventive and exciting debut.”–Grace Talusan, “Rumpus “”An extraordinary debut, at once flashy and substantial, brightly charming and quietly resistant to its own wattage . . . Syjuco’s gifts for pastiche, his protean narrative energy, are in particular evidence in these pitch-perfect fictions of the fictions of his fictional author . . . An exuberant, funny novel that neither takes its grand ambitions too seriously, nor pretends to be measuring itself by any less a scale of intent. How Syjuco . . . has done this is foremost a testament to his prodigious gifts . . . With his dazzling first foray, Syjuco suggest how his new Asia, his new identity, must ‘look’ on the page and between the covers. That look is unexpected and fresh, quite unlike anything that has been seen before.”–Charles Foran, “The Globe and Mail” (Canada) “Wildly entertaining . . . Engaging . . . Absolutely assured in its tone, literary sophistication and satirical humor . . . Syjuco is only on his mid-30s, and he already possesses the wand of the enchanter.” –Michael Dirda, “The Washington Post “””Ilustrado” will provoke audible oohs and ahhs from readers . . . The writing is gorgeous. Plus, there’s an O. Henry twist in the epilogue. This is a great book. Read it.”–Luis Clemens, Senior Editor, “Tell Me More “”Brilliantly conceived, and stylishly executed, [“Ilustrado”] covers a large and tumultuous historical period with seemingly effortless skill. It is also ceaselessly entertaining, frequently raunchy, and effervescent with humour.”–2008 Man Asian Literary Prize Panel of Judges “Miguel Syjuco’s dizzyingly energetic and inventive novel views his native Philippines with a merciless yet loving eye, its many voices a chorus illuminating the various facets of this chaotic, complicated country. An ambitious and admirable debut.”–Janice Y. K. Lee, author of “The Piano Teacher “”Vulnerable and mischievous, sophisticated and naive, ” Ilustrado” explores the paradoxes that come with the search for identity and throws readers into the fragile space between self-pursuit and self-destruction. A novel about country and self, youth and experience, it is elegiac, thoughtful, and original.”–Colin McAdam, author of “Fall” and “Some Great Thing “”From the ruckus of rumors, blogs, ambitions, overweening grandparents, indifferent history, and personal crimes, Miguel Syjuco has innovatively reimagined that most wonderfully old-fashioned consolation: literature. “Ilustrado “is a great novel.”–Rivka Galchen, author of “Atmospheric Disturbances “”Syjuco’s exceptional novel exceeds its heightened expectations, serving notice that a brilliant new talent has arrived, somehow fully formed.”–Jared Bland, “The Walrus “”Dazzling . . . It is a virtuoso display of imagination and wisdom, particularly remarkable from a 31-year-old author; a literary landmark for the Philippines and beyond.”–Michele Leber, “Booklist” (starred review) “This imaginative first novel shows considerable ingenuity in binding its divergent threads into a satisfying, meaningful story.”–“Publishers Weekly” (starred review) “Through his vivid use of language, Syjuco has crafted a beautiful work of historical fiction that’s part mystery and part sociopolitical commentary. Readers who enjoyed Junot Diaz’s “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” will enjoy this literary gem.”–“Library Journal” (starred review) “An ambitious debut novel, winner of the Man Asian Literary Prize, introduces an author of limitless promise . . . It dazzles as brightly as Jonathan Safran Foer’s “Everything Is Illuminated” . . . First novels rarely show such reach and depth.”–“Kirkus Reviews”” (starred review)”

The illuminatus! trilogy

Product Description

“The biggest sci-fi cult novel to come along since Dune.”–The Village Voice.

From the Publisher

Filled with sex and violence–in and out of time and space–the three books of The Illuminatus are only partly works of the imagination. They tackle all the coverups of our time–from who really shot the Kennedys to why there’s a pyramid on a one-dollar bill.

If I Stay

In a single moment, everything changes. Seventeenyear- old Mia has no memory of the accident; she can only recall riding along the snow-wet Oregon road with her family. Then, in a blink, she fi nds herself watching as her own damaged body is taken from the wreck…

A sophisticated, layered, and heartachingly beautiful story about the power of family and friends, the choices we all makeand the ultimate choice Mia commands.

Idiot America: How Stupidity Became a Virtue in the Land of the Free

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **NATIONAL BESTSELLER****The three Great Premises of Idiot America:· Any theory is valid if it sells books, soaks up ratings, or otherwise moves units· Anything can be true if someone says it loudly enough· Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it** With his trademark wit and insight, veteran journalist Charles Pierce delivers a gut-wrenching, side-splitting lament about the glorification of ignorance in the United States. Pierce asks how a country founded on intellectual curiosity has somehow deteriorated into a nation of simpletons more apt to vote for an *American Idol* contestant than a presidential candidate. But his thunderous denunciation is also a secret call to action, as he hopes that somehow, being intelligent will stop being a stigma, and that pinheads will once again be pitied, not celebrated. Erudite and razor-sharp, *Idiot America* is at once an invigorating history lesson, a cutting cultural critique, and a bullish appeal to our smarter selves.

I Suck at Girls

From the author of the massive #1 New York Times bestseller
$#*! MY DAD SAYS, Justin Halpern, comes a laugh-out-loud funny and touching series of stories about relationships with the opposite sex, from his first kiss to getting engaged and all the awkward moments in between.
The day before Justin Halpern proposed to his wife, he told his father what he was about to do. In typical fashion, his dad was unimpressed by this life-changing decision. Their conversation about his plan is where the book begins.
“You’ve been dating her four years, it ain’t like you invented a parallel f-ing universe.”
But his dad could tell he was nervous and needed a push, so he gave Justin some advice: to take an entire day, go off somewhere on his own, think about all the things he’d learned about women, relationships, and himself over the years, and make an educated guess as to whether this was the right decision.
Justin followed his advice, and at the end of the day, decided that he wanted to go ahead with his decision to put that ring on Amanda’s finger, but also that the events and people he recalled during this daylong trip down memory lane would be a really funny subject for his next book.
Justin’s journey through his past, told chronologically so that the reader’s experience echoes his own, will include: his nine-year-old fear that on his wedding night not only would his wife see him naked but that he was also obligated to have sex with her; being the last of his friends to lose his virginity at age twenty, while being the dishwasher at Hooters; taking a trip to Europe in hopes that maybe women were easier to talk to overseas, only to find that the only people he could carry on a conversation with were an Asian man who wore all denim and a one-ankled eighty-year-old obsessed with John F. Kennedy; and finally, the conversation he had with his father as he drove him to the airport to get on a plane to fly to San Francisco to propose to Amanda.
**

I shall wear midnight

When she was nine, Tiffany Aching took on the Queen of Fairyland, armed with only a frying pan.

At eleven, she defeated the ancient, bodiless hiver.

At thirteen, she saved the world from the threat of endless winter.

In Tiffany’s final adventure, the young witch faces an insidious new foe, one who whispers threats of violence and quietly unleashes havoc. Evil is abroad in the land. And along with her allies, the diminutive-yet-fierce Wee Free Men, Tiffany may know evil when she sees it, but where does evil start, and where—and how—does it end?

Multiple award winner and New York Times bestseller Terry Pratchett spins a tale—both wickedly funny and profoundly chilling—about the perils of ignorance and the cost of knowledge.
**Recensie(s)**

New York Times Book Review”Like Celtic mythology fused with Buffy the Vampire Slayer.”Washington Post Book World”Exuberant and irresistible.”Chicago Tribune”Wonderful language, genuinely scary explorations, and a young girl whose growing up is believable and exciting.”The Horn Book”Pratchett’s unique blend of comedy and articulate insight is at its very best.”
(source: Bol.com)

I know why the caged bird sings

Amazon.com Review

In this first of five volumes of autobiography, poet Maya Angelou recounts a youth filled with disappointment, frustration, tragedy, and finally hard-won independence. Sent at a young age to live with her grandmother in Arkansas, Angelou learned a great deal from this exceptional woman and the tightly knit black community there. These very lessons carried her throughout the hardships she endured later in life, including a tragic occurrence while visiting her mother in St. Louis and her formative years spent in California–where an unwanted pregnancy changed her life forever. Marvelously told, with Angelou’s “gift for language and observation,” this “remarkable autobiography by an equally remarkable black woman from Arkansas captures, indelibly, a world of which most Americans are shamefully ignorant.”

From School Library Journal

Grade 10 Up. Two slender volumes that present critical information about popular classic titles. Bloom’s introduction is followed by a short biographical sketch of each author and then a detailed thematic and structural analysis that summarizes the novel in question, chapter by chapter. Excerpts from critical essays constitute the major portion of each book. Some of the essays on The Sun center around character analysis, especially of the main female character, Brett Ashley. Other entries include comparisons to other works of literature including F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and discussions of the symbolism, morality, and the work’s historical context. Hemingway’s own interpretation of the book and a letter from Fitzgerald to Hemingway about its flaws are excerpted. In the second book, the writings explore Angelou’s use of language, her narrative technique, unique qualities of Caged Bird, comparisons with other works, and opposition to it. Motherhood, racial pride and self-hatred, rape, and honesty are among the issues explored. While similar material may be found in many other places, these series titles will be useful resources.?Lois McCulley, Wichita Falls High School, TX
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

I Am Ozzy

EDITORIAL REVIEW: “They’ve said some crazy things about me over the years. I mean, okay: ‘He bit the head off a bat.’ Yes. ‘He bit the head off a dove.’ Yes. But then you hear things like, ‘Ozzy went to the show last night, but he wouldn’t perform until he’d killed fifteen puppies . . .’ Now *me*, kill fifteen puppies? I love puppies. I’ve got eighteen of the f**king things at home. I’ve killed a few cows in my time, mind you. And the chickens. I shot the chickens in my house that night. It haunts me, all this crazy stuff. Every day of my life has been an event. I took lethal combinations of booze and drugs for thirty f**king years. I survived a direct hit by a plane, suicidal overdoses, STDs. I’ve been accused of attempted murder. Then I almost died while riding over a bump on a quad bike at f**king two miles per hour. People ask me how come I’m still alive, and I don’t know what to say. When I was growing up, if you’d have put me up against a wall with the other kids from my street and asked me which one of us was gonna make it to the age of sixty, which one of us would end up with five kids and four grandkids and houses in Buckinghamshire and Beverly Hills, I wouldn’t have put money on me, no f**king way. But here I am: ready to tell my story, in my own words, for the first time. A lot of it ain’t gonna be pretty. I’ve done some bad things in my time. I’ve always been drawn to the dark side, me. But I ain’t the *devil*. I’m just John Osbourne: a working-class kid from Aston, who quit his job in the factory and went looking for a good time.”

I Am Number Four

John Smith is not your average teenager.
He regularly moves from small town to small town. He changes his name and identity. He does not put down roots. He cannot tell anyone who or what he really is. If he stops moving those who hunt him will find and kill him.
But you can’t run forever. So when he stops in Paradise, Ohio, John decides to try and settle down. To fit in. And for the first time he makes some real friends. People he cares about – and who care about him. Never in John’s short life has there been space for friendship, or even love.
But it’s just a matter of time before John’s secret is revealed.
He was once one of nine. Three of them have been killed.
John is Number Four. He knows that he is next..
**Recensie(s)**

Terrifically propulsive. –Booklist
(source: Bol.com)

I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban

**A MEMOIR BY THE YOUNGEST RECIPIENT OF THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
****As seen on Netflix with David Letterman**
“I come from a country that was created at midnight. When I almost died it was just after midday.”
When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education.
On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive.
Instead, Malala’s miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she became a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize.
*I AM MALALA *is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls’ education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons.
*I AM MALALA *will make you believe in the power of one person’s voice to inspire change in the world.
**

Hush: A Novel

EDITORIAL REVIEW: *New York Times* bestselling author and *Cosmopolitan*’s editor-in-chief returns with a sizzling, page-turning thriller in which an ordinary woman flees the scene of a murder—and realizes it’s not just the law that’s hunting her. When Lake Warren learns that her husband, Jack, is suing for full custody of their two kids four months after their separation, she’s pretty certain that things can’t get any worse. The upside is that she’s working with the Advanced Fertility Center as a marketing consultant, alongside the attractive, flirtatious Dr. Keaton. But the morning after their one-night stand, Lake finds Keaton with his throat slashed and discovers that things can indeed become worse—they can become deadly. So as not to jeopardize her case for custody, Lake is forced to lie to the police. Having just been intimate with a man who has been murdered, and wanting to protect herself from being charged with the crime, she begins her own search for the truth. Meanwhile, the police start looking at her closely, people at the clinic start treating her with hostility, and strange clues begin dropping—quite literally—on her doorstep, and Lake realizes that she is dangerously close to dark secrets, both about Keaton and the clinic. But can Lake stop what she’s started before it’s too late?