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The Adventure of the Norwood Builder

In “The Adventure of the Norwood Builder”, a young lawyer asks Holmes to clear him of the charge murdering a rich man soon after preparing the man’s will. Inspector Lestrade is convinced of the young attorney’s guilt and believes he has finally bested Holmes, but by the use of forensic science and a bogus house fire, Holmes is able to exonerate the young lawyer while proving he was set-up.

The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter

In “The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter”, a young rugby player asks Holmes and Watson for help finding his missing teammate before a big game. The client explains that his missing teammate disappeared with an older man after sending a mysterious telegram. Holmes and Watson, using forensic techniques on the telegram, track the missing player to a nearby town. After being stonewalled by the doctor of the missing player, Holmes finally him with the help of a tracking dog. Then Holmes and Watson learn the shocking secret of the man’s disappearance.

The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez

In “The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez”, a young man working as the assistant to a Professor has been murdered. While it appears that anyone could have entered the house and committed the murder, a clue in the form of a pair of gold glasses is found near the body. Working on the assumption that the killer wore the glasses as well as several other clues, Holmes comes to the chilling realization that the murderer is still in the house.

The Adventure of the Final Problem

“The Final Problem” is a short story by British writer Arthur Conan Doyle featuring his detective character Sherlock Holmes. It was first published in Strand Magazine in December 1893. It appears in book form as part of the collection The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Conan Doyle later ranked “The Final Problem” fourth on his personal list of the twelve best Holmes stories. wiki

The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb

In his narration, Dr. Watson notes that this is one of only two cases which he personally brought to the attention of Sherlock Holmes. The story, set in 1889, mainly consists of a young London consultant hydraulic engineer, Mr. Victor Hatherley, recounting strange happenings of the night before, first to Dr. Watson, who dresses the stump where Mr. Hatherley’s thumb has been cut off, and then to Sherlock Holmes himself. Hatherley had been visited in his office by a man who identified himself as Colonel Lysander Stark. He offered Hatherley a commission at a country house, to examine a hydraulic press used, as Stark explains, to compress fuller’s earth into bricks. Stark warned Hatherley to keep the job confidential, offering him 50 guineas (£52 10s, an enormous sum at the time, worth over £4000 today). Hatherley felt compelled to take this work, despite his misgivings, as his business was newly established and he had very little work.

The Adventure of the Empty House

The Adventure of the Empty House was written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, best known for his novel A Study in Scarlet. This is a one of 13 stories in the cycle collected as The Return of Sherlock Holmes.
Public pressure forced Conan Doyle to bring the sleuth back to life, and explain his apparently miraculous survival of a deadly struggle with Professor Moriarty. Doyle ranked “The Adventure of the Empty House” sixth in his list of his twelve favorite Holmes stories.
The Empty house is set in April 1894. Watson (now a widower) checks 427 Park Lane where a young gambler, the Honorable Ronald Adair, was shot in a closed room on 30 March. He bumps into a wizened old book collector, who follows him home to his Kensington practice study then drops his disguise – it is Holmes. Holmes apologizes for the deception needed to outwit his enemies, and describes his three years’ exploits. He needed funds, so he confided in his brother Mycroft, who had preserved Sherlock Holmes’s rooms. **
### Sinossi
The Adventure of the Empty House was written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, best known for his novel A Study in Scarlet. This is a one of 13 stories in the cycle collected as The Return of Sherlock Holmes.
Public pressure forced Conan Doyle to bring the sleuth back to life, and explain his apparently miraculous survival of a deadly struggle with Professor Moriarty. Doyle ranked “The Adventure of the Empty House” sixth in his list of his twelve favorite Holmes stories.
The Empty house is set in April 1894. Watson (now a widower) checks 427 Park Lane where a young gambler, the Honorable Ronald Adair, was shot in a closed room on 30 March. He bumps into a wizened old book collector, who follows him home to his Kensington practice study then drops his disguise – it is Holmes. Holmes apologizes for the deception needed to outwit his enemies, and describes his three years’ exploits. He needed funds, so he confided in his brother Mycroft, who had preserved Sherlock Holmes’s rooms.

The Adventure of the Dying Detective

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish physician and writer who is most noted for his fictional stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction. He is also known for writing the fictional adventures of a second character he invented, Professor Challenger, and for popularising the mystery of the Mary Celeste. He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, and historical novels.Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective created by Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, a graduate of the University of Edinburgh Medical School. A London-based “consulting detective” whose abilities border on the fantastic, Holmes is famous for his astute logical reasoning, his ability to adopt almost any disguise, and his use of forensic science skills to solve difficult cases.Holmes, who first appeared in publication in 1887, was featured in four novels and 56 short stories. The first novel, A Study in Scarlet, appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887 and the second, The Sign of the Four, in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine in 1890. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine, beginning with “A Scandal in Bohemia” in 1891; further series of short stories and two novels published in serial form appeared between then and 1927. The stories cover a period from around 1880 up to 1914.All but four stories are narrated by Holmes’s friend and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson; two are narrated by Holmes himself (“The Blanched Soldier” and “The Lion’s Mane”) and two others are written in the third person (“The Mazarin Stone” and “His Last Bow”). In two stories (“The Musgrave Ritual” and “The Gloria Scott”), Holmes tells Watson the main story from his memories, while Watson becomes the narrator of the frame story. The first and fourth novels, A Study in Scarlet and The Valley of Fear, each include a long interval of omniscient narration recounting events unknown to either Holmes or Watson. **

Adventure of the Devil’s Foot

In recording from time to time some of the curious experiences and interesting recollections which I associate with my long and intimate friendship with Mr. Sherlock Holmes, I have continually been faced by difficulties caused by his own aversion to publicity. To his sombre and cynical spirit all popular applause was always abhorrent, and nothing amused him more at the end of a successful case than to hand over the actual exposure to some orthodox official, and to listen with a mocking smile to the general chorus of misplaced congratulation. It was indeed this attitude upon the part of my friend and certainly not any lack of interesting material which has caused me of late years to lay very few of my records before the public. My participation in some of his adventures was always a privilege which entailed discretion and reticence upon me.

The Adventure of the Dancing Men

Holmes had been seated for some hours in silence with his long, thin back curved over a chemical vessel in which he was brewing a particularly malodorous product. His head was sunk upon his breast, and he looked from my point of view like a strange, lank bird, with dull gray plumage and a black top-knot. “So, Watson,” said he, suddenly, “you do not propose to invest in South African securities?” I gave a start of astonishment. Accustomed as I was to Holmes’s curious faculties, this sudden intrusion into my most intimate thoughts was utterly inexplicable. “How on earth do you know that?” I asked.

The Adventure of the Copper Beeches

Sherlock Holmes, the world’s “only unofficial consulting detective”, was first introduced to readers in A Study in Scarlet published by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. It was with the publication of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, however, that the master sleuth grew tremendously in popularity, later to become one of the most beloved literary characters of all time.In this book series, the short stories comprising The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes have been amusingly illustrated using only Lego® brand minifigures and bricks. The illustrations recreate, through custom designed Lego models, the composition of the black and white drawings by Sidney Paget that accompanied the original publication of these adventures appearing in The Strand Magazine from July 1891 to June 1892. Paget’s iconic illustrations are largely responsible for the popular image of Sherlock Holmes, including his deerstalker cap and Inverness cape, details never mentioned in the writings of Conan Doyle.This uniquely illustrated collection, which features some of the most famous and enjoyable cases investigated by Sherlock Holmes and his devoted friend and biographer Dr. John H. Watson, including A Sandal in Bohemia and The Red-Headed League, is sure to delight Lego enthusiasts, as well as fans of the Great Detective, both old and new.LEGO® is a trademark of the LEGO Group of Companies. The LEGO Group has not been involved in nor has it in any other way licensed or authorised the publication of this book.THE ADVENTURE OF THE COPPER BEECHES: A young lady named Violet Hunter visits Baker Street seeking the advice of Sherlock Holmes on whether to accept a job as governess which commands a generous salary, but with some peculiar conditions. Two weeks after ultimately accepting the position, Miss Hunter calls Holmes to The Copper Beaches, an estate in Hampshire, to look into the singular, and at times terrifying, behaviour of her employers.

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Complete Brand New Edition “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the second of the twelve Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine in 1892. Miss Susan Cushing of Croydon receives a parcel in the post that contains two severed human ears packed in coarse salt. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard suspects a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their unruly behaviour. The parcel was sent from Belfast, the city of origin of one of the former boarders. Upon examining the parcel himself, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime. He reasons that a medical student with access to a dissection laboratory would likely use something other than plain salt to preserve human remains, and would be able to make a more precise cut than the roughly hacked ears suggest. The address on the package, roughly written and with a spelling correction, suggests to Holmes that the sender lacks education and is unfamiliar with Croydon. The knot in the string suggests to Holmes that they are looking for someone with sailing experience. **
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The Adventure of the Cardboard Box By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Complete Brand New Edition “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the second of the twelve Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine in 1892. Miss Susan Cushing of Croydon receives a parcel in the post that contains two severed human ears packed in coarse salt. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard suspects a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their unruly behaviour. The parcel was sent from Belfast, the city of origin of one of the former boarders. Upon examining the parcel himself, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime. He reasons that a medical student with access to a dissection laboratory would likely use something other than plain salt to preserve human remains, and would be able to make a more precise cut than the roughly hacked ears suggest. The address on the package, roughly written and with a spelling correction, suggests to Holmes that the sender lacks education and is unfamiliar with Croydon. The knot in the string suggests to Holmes that they are looking for someone with sailing experience.

The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle

Once in London on Christmas Eve at the hotel has committed a larceny. Countess of Morcar has been stolen a precious diamond which was called Blue Carbuncle. It was one of the most expensive gems in the world. Suspicions has fallen on John Horner he has been working at the hotel as a plumber. He was imprisoned for robbery because previously he had served out in prison for the same crime. Plumber to denied a charge but nobody believed him. At the same time on one of the streets of London ruffians attacked the man. Nearly of that place was walking a commissionaire Peterson and like an honest person he had decided help that man and to defended against of them. The attacked man had run away and dropped the goose which he carried with him. Peterson took the goose home to eat the bird and his wife had pulled out of it a diamond. This diamond the honest man Peterson had brought to Holmes. **