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Bright Young Things

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Bright Young Things (Bright Young Things Series #1) by Anna Godbersen
The year is 1929. New York is ruled by the Bright Young Things: flappers and socialites seeking thrills and chasing dreams in the anything-goes era of the Roaring Twenties.
Letty Larkspur and Cordelia Grey escaped their small Midwestern town for New York’s glittering metropolis. All Letty wants is to see her name in lights, but she quickly discovers Manhattan is filled with pretty girls who will do anything to be a star. . . .
Cordelia is searching for the father she’s never known, a man as infamous for his wild parties as he is for his shadowy schemes. Overnight, she enters a world more thrilling and glamorous than she ever could have imagined—and more dangerous. It’s a life anyone would kill for . . . and someone will.
The only person Cordelia can trust is ­Astrid Donal, a flapper who seems to have it all: money, looks, and the love of Cordelia’s brother, Charlie. But Astrid’s perfect veneer hides a score of family secrets.
Across the vast lawns of Long Island, in the ­illicit speakeasies of Manhattan, and on the blindingly lit stages of Broadway, the three girls’ fortunes will rise and fall—together and apart. From the *New York Times*-bestselling author of *The Luxe* comes an epic new series set in the dizzying last summer of the Jazz Age.

A Briefer History of Time

EDITORIAL REVIEW: From One of the Most Brilliant Minds of Our TimeComes a Book that Clarifies His Most Important Ideas****Stephen Hawking’s worldwide bestseller, **A Brief History of Time***,* remains one of the landmark volumes in scientific writing of our time. But for years readers have asked for a more accessible formulation of its key concepts—the nature of space and time, the role of God in creation, and the history and future of the universe. Professor Hawking’s response is this new work that will guide nonscientists everywhere in the ongoing search for the tantalizing secrets at the heart of time and space.… ****Although “briefer,” this book is much more than a mere explanation of Hawking’s earlier work. **A Briefer History of Time** both clarifies and expands on the great subjects of the original, and records the latest developments in the field—from string theory to the search for a unified theory of all the forces of physics. Thirty-seven full-color illustrations enhance the text and make** A Briefer History of Time** an exhilarating and must-have addition in its own right to the great literature of science and ideas.**

The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama

EDITORIAL REVIEW: No story has been more central to America’s history this century than the rise of Barack Obama, and until now, no journalist or historian has written a book that** **fully investigates the circumstances and experiences of Obama’s life or explores the ambition behind his rise.** **Those familiar with Obama’s own best-selling memoir** **or his campaign speeches know the touchstones and details that he chooses to emphasize, but now—from a writer whose gift for illuminating the historical significance** **of unfolding events is without peer—we have a portrait, at once masterly and fresh,** **nuanced and unexpected, of a young man in search of himself,** **and of a rising politician determined to become the first African-American president.*The Bridge* offers the most complete account yet of** **Obama’s tragic father, a brilliant economist who abandoned** **his family and ended his life as a beaten man;** **of his mother, Stanley Ann Dunham,** **who had a child as a teenager and then built her career as an anthropologist living and studying in Indonesia;** **and of the succession of elite institutions that first exposed Obama** **to the social tensions and intellectual currents** **that would force him to imagine and fashion an identity for himself. Through extensive on-the-record interviews with friends and teachers, mentors and disparagers, family members and Obama himself,** **David Remnick allows us to see how a rootless, unaccomplished, and confused young man** **created himself first as a community organizer in Chicago, an** **experience that would not only shape his urge to work in politics but give him a home and a community, and that would propel him to Harvard Law School, where his sense of a greater mission emerged.Deftly setting Obama’s political career against the galvanizing intersection of race and politics in Chicago’s history, Remnick shows us how that city’s complex racial legacy would make Obama’s forays into politics a source of controversy and bare-knuckle tactics: his clashes with older black politicians in the Illinois State Senate, his disastrous decision to challenge the former Black Panther Bobby Rush for Congress in 2000, the sex scandals that would decimate his more experienced opponents in the 2004 Senate race, and the story—from both sides—of his confrontation with his former pastor, Jeremiah Wright.** **By looking at Obama’s political rise through the prism of our racial history, Remnick gives us the conflicting agendas of black politicians: the dilemmas of men like Jesse Jackson, John Lewis, and Joseph Lowery,** **heroes of the civil rights movement, who are forced to reassess old loyalties and understand the priorities of a new generation of African-American leaders.*The Bridge* revisits the American drama of race, from slavery to civil rights, and makes clear how Obama’s quest is not just his own but is emblematic of a nation where destiny is defined by individuals keen to imagine a future that is different from the reality of their current lives. EDITORIAL REVIEW: No story has been more central to America’s history this century than the rise of Barack Obama, and until now, no journalist or historian has written a book that** **fully investigates the circumstances and experiences of Obama’s life or explores the ambition behind his rise.** **Those familiar with Obama’s own best-selling memoir** **or his campaign speeches know the touchstones and details that he chooses to emphasize, but now—from a writer whose gift for illuminating the historical significance** **of unfolding events is without peer—we have a portrait, at once masterly and fresh,** **nuanced and unexpected, of a young man in search of himself,** **and of a rising politician determined to become the first African-American president.*The Bridge* offers the most complete account yet of** **Obama’s tragic father, a brilliant economist who abandoned** **his family and ended his life as a beaten man;** **of his mother, Stanley Ann Dunham,** **who had a child as a teenager and then built her career as an anthropologist living and studying in Indonesia;** **and of the succession of elite institutions that first exposed Obama** **to the social tensions and intellectual currents** **that would force him to imagine and fashion an identity for himself. Through extensive on-the-record interviews with friends and teachers, mentors and disparagers, family members and Obama himself,** **David Remnick allows us to see how a rootless, unaccomplished, and confused young man** **created himself first as a community organizer in Chicago, an** **experience that would not only shape his urge to work in politics but give him a home and a community, and that would propel him to Harvard Law School, where his sense of a greater mission emerged.Deftly setting Obama’s political career against the galvanizing intersection of race and politics in Chicago’s history, Remnick shows us how that city’s complex racial legacy would make Obama’s forays into politics a source of controversy and bare-knuckle tactics: his clashes with older black politicians in the Illinois State Senate, his disastrous decision to challenge the former Black Panther Bobby Rush for Congress in 2000, the sex scandals that would decimate his more experienced opponents in the 2004 Senate race, and the story—from both sides—of his confrontation with his former pastor, Jeremiah Wright.** **By looking at Obama’s political rise through the prism of our racial history, Remnick gives us the conflicting agendas of black politicians: the dilemmas of men like Jesse Jackson, John Lewis, and Joseph Lowery,** **heroes of the civil rights movement, who are forced to reassess old loyalties and understand the priorities of a new generation of African-American leaders.*The Bridge* revisits the American drama of race, from slavery to civil rights, and makes clear how Obama’s quest is not just his own but is emblematic of a nation where destiny is defined by individuals keen to imagine a future that is different from the reality of their current lives.

Bridge of Birds

EDITORIAL REVIEW: When the children of his village were struck with a mysterious illness, Number Ten Ox found master Li Kao. Together they set out to find the Great Root of Power, the only possible cure, and together they discover adventure and legend, and the power of belief….

The Bride’s Awakening

Vittorio va a ensenarle a ser una mujer
Vittorio Ralfino, conde de Cazlevara, ha vuelto a Italia para buscar una mujer tradicional. Y Anamaria Viale, una chica de su pueblo, leal y discreta, es perfecta para el.
Anamaria se asombra cuando su amor de la adolescencia le propone matrimonio…a ella, el patito feo. Alta, desgarbada y mas bien torpe, Anamaria se habia resignado estoicamente a seguir soltera.
Pero Vittorio es persuasivo…y muy apasionado. Le propone matrimonio como si fuera un acuerdo de negocios, pero pronto despierta en Ana un poderoso y profundo deseo que solo el puede saciar…

The Bricklayer

The Bricklayer by Noah Boyd
Someone gives you a dangerous puzzle to solve, one that may kill you or someone else, and you’re about to fail. . . . And there is no other option. No one who can help. No one but the Bricklayer.
The Bricklayer is the pulse-pounding novel introducing Steve Vail, one of the most charismatic new heroes to come along in thriller fiction in many years. He’s an ex-FBI agent who’s been fired for insubordination but is lured back to the Bureau to work a case that has become more unsolvable-and more deadly-by the hour.
A woman steps out of the shower in her Los Angeles home and is startled by an intruder sitting calmly in her bedroom holding a gun. But she is frozen with fear by what he has to say about the FBI-and what he says he must do. . . .
A young agent slips into the night water off a rocky beach. He’s been instructed to swim to a nearby island to deposit a million dollars demanded by a blackmailer. But his mission is riddled with hazardous tests, as if someone wanted to destroy him rather than collect the money. . . .
Vail has resigned himself to his dismissal and is content with his life as a bricklayer. But the FBI, especially Deputy Assistant Director Kate Bannon, needs help with a shadowy group that has initiated a brilliant extortion plot. The group will keep killing their targets until the agency pays them off, the amount and number of bodies escalating each time the FBI fails. One thing is clear: someone who knows a little too much about the inner workings of the Bureau is very clever-and very angry-and will kill and kill again if it means he can disgrace the FBI.
Steve Vail’s options-and his time to find answers-are swiftly runningout.
Noah Boyd’s The Bricklayer is written with the bracing authenticity only someone who has been a crack FBI investigator can provide. And in this masterful debut Boyd has created a mind-bending maze of clues and traps inside a nonstop thrill ride that is sure to leave readers exhilarated and enthralled.

Brian’s Winter

From Publishers Weekly

First there was Hatchet, Paulsen’s classic tale of a boy’s survival in the north woods after a plane crash. Then came a sequel, The River, and, last year, Father Water, Mother Woods, a collection of autobiographical essays introduced as the nonfiction counterpart to Hatchet. Now Paulsen backs up and asks readers to imagine that Brian, the hero, hadn’t been rescued after all. His many fans will be only too glad to comply, revisiting Brian at the onset of a punishing Canadian winter. The pace never relents-the story begins, as it were, in the middle, with Brian already toughened up and his reflexes primed for crisis. Paulsen serves up one cliffhanger after another (a marauding bear, a charging elk), and always there are the supreme challenges of obtaining food and protection against the cold. Authoritative narration makes it easy for readers to join Brian vicariously as he wields his hatchet to whittle arrows and arrowheads and a lance, hunts game, and devises clothes out of animal skins; while teasers at the ends of chapters keep the tension high (“He would hunt big tomorrow, he thought…. But as it happened he very nearly never hunted again”). The moral of the story: it pays to write your favorite author and ask for another helping. Ages 12-up.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-9-At the conclusion of Hatchet (Macmillan, 1987), Brian Robeson is rescued after surviving a plane crash and summer alone in the north Canadian woods. Now, in this second sequel, Paulsen shows what would have happened if the 13-year-old boy had been forced to endure the harsh winter. For a brief time, Brian lives in relative luxury, living off the contents of the recently recovered survival pack, which included a gun for hunting. Then, his freeze-dried food runs out and his rifle fails, and he realizes how careless and complacent he has become. Suddenly aware of the changing seasons, he works frantically to winterize his shelter, fashion warmer clothes from animal skins, and construct a more powerful bow and arrow. About the time he has mastered winter survival, he discovers a dog-sled trail that leads him to a trapper and final rescue. The same formula that worked before is successful here: the driving pace of the narration, the breathtaking descriptions of nature, and the boy who triumphs on the merits of efficient problem solving. The author’s ability to cast a spell, mesmerize his audience, and provide a clinic in winter survival is reason enough to buy this novel. Although the plot is both familiar and predictable, Paulsen fans will not be disappointed.?Tim Rausch, Crescent View Middle School, Sandy, UT
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Brian’s Return

Amazon.com Review

A deer in his canoe, a bear attack, a leg stabbed with an arrowhead–it’s just another week in the life of 16-year-old Brian Robeson. In his opinion, this beats a date at Mackey’s Pizza Den, a fight with a bully, and a video game at the mall any day. After having survived a plane crash and 54 days in the Canadian wilderness several years earlier, Brian can’t seem to fit into “civilization.” The world of high school and family life makes no sense anymore. So Brian begins to plan. It’s time to return to the woods. This time, though, he makes no plans to come back home.

Gary Paulsen, the popular author of many critically acclaimed books for young people and winner of the 1997 Margaret A. Edward Award, has written another sequel to the Newbery Honor Book __. ( and were earlier sequels.) Paulsen’s graphic and detailed descriptions of Brian’s adventures demonstrate a deep familiarity and connection to the wilderness; and in fact the author has spent much of his life in the bush, living almost entirely off the land. Brian’s experiences in nature parallel his growing independence and maturity; readers who don’t feel like they “fit in” will easily relate to the young protagonist’s search for identity and purity. (Ages 11 and older) –Emilie Coulter

From Publishers Weekly

The appearance of yet another sequel to Hatchet may raise a few eyebrows, but Paulsen delivers a vigorous, stirring story that stands on its own merits. Whereas the previous continuations, The River and Brian’s Winter, essentially offer more of the same survivalist thrills that have made Hatchet so popular, this novel goes further, posing a more profound question: How does someone go from living on the edge to polite membership in ordinary society? (Paulsen addresses the same theme, albeit more grimly, in his Civil War novel Soldier’s Heart.) Here, Brian has returned to his mother’s house and can barely reconcile the seemingly arbitrary demands of high school with the life-or-death challenges he surmounted during his months alone in the wilderness. With the aid of a counselor, Brian formulates what had been an almost instinctual, unacknowledged plan to revisit the bush, and this solo trip, not his interlude with his mother, marks the true “return” of the title. The few cliff-hangers are almost beside the point: the great adventure here is the embrace of the wild, the knowledge of life at its most elemental. Aside from its occasional use of YA conventions (e.g., the preternaturally sensitive counselor; jejune rhapsodies over the relevance of Shakespeare), this work is bold, confident and persuasive, its transcendental themes powerfully seductive. Ages 12-up.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Brian’s Hunt

Amazon.com Review

The multitudes of __ fans) will be thrilled to find that the author has penned yet another story about Brian Robeson. Although Paulsen once claimed that he would “write no more about Brian,” he seems to have been softened by the “staggering amounts of mail from readers” begging for more about the teen who is more at home alone in the wilderness than in the hustle and bustle of city life. In Brian’s Hunt, the 16-year-old returns to the remote woods and lakes of Canada, where he encounters a mysteriously injured dog. His experiences two years earlier, after surviving a plane crash and months alone with only a hatchet to protect and provide for himself (, , etc.), have prepared him well to survive now. But can anything prime him for the horror that awaits him on an island campsite where he intends to meet his Cree friends?

This short episode is rife with the kind of gritty–even gruesome–details readers have come to expect from the Newbery Honor author. In an afterword, Paulsen reminds readers that he bases his stories on personal experiences and his extensive knowledge of the wild side of nature.

Confidential to avid fans: an intimation of romance amid all the rugged drama hints that this will not be the last Brian book, either. (Ages 10 to 13) –Emilie Coulter

From School Library Journal

Grade 6-9-In an author’s note, Paulsen explains why he decided to reopen the story first begun in Hatchet (Bradbury, 1987). In this short installment, Brian, now 16, is back in the wilderness and encounters a savagely wounded dog. He makes his way to the lake island home of the Cree man he met in Brian’s Return (Delacorte, 1999), where he discovers the tragedy that led to the dog’s liberation. David and his wife have been partially eaten by a bear, which necessitates the hunt mentioned in the title and described in the final chapter. Throughout, the protagonist frequently remembers events from his original stranding, alludes to the problems he had faced trying to return to “civilization,” and ultimately explains the special arrangement by which he has returned to the “bush” instead of high school. Although the story does stand alone, these many references will make the audience want to read (or reread) the earlier books. This story is not as well developed as the other episodes but it is a must-read for the hordes of existing Hatchet fans out there, and it may also serve to draw some new readers into the fold. An afterword discusses bear behavior and Paulsen’s experiences with these animals.
Sean George, Memphis-Shelby County Public Library & Information Center, Memphis, TN
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Breathe

An original and horrific slice of urban terror from one of the masters of the genre… All is not well at SymaxCorp. The work is piled high, people are toiling overnight to meet deadlines, and the supervisors are keeping their beady eyes on everyone. But staff are complaining of feeling sick, and the last health and safety officer disappeared one evening never to be seen again. It’s down to new boy Ben, together with temp Miranda, kick-boxing Meera and overweight June to try and get to the bottom of the problem. As colleagues are progressively transformed into mindless, blood crazed zombies, Ben and his friends discover that there really is something in the air…

Breaking Night

EDITORIAL REVIEW: “*Breaking Night* reads more like an adventure story than an addiction-morality tale. It’s a white-knuckle account of survival. . . . By age 6, Murray knew how to mainline drugs (though she never took them) and how to care for her strung-out parents. She showed uncanny maturity, even as a child, and later managed to avoid that malady of teenagers and memoir writers, self-pity. . . . Murray’s stoicism has been hard-earned; it serves her well as a writer. *Breaking Night* itself is full of heart, without a sliver of ice, and deeply moving.” (*The New York Times Book Review*) “Liz Murray shows us that the human spirit has infinite ability to grow and can never be limited by circumstance. *Breaking Night* is a beautifully written, heartfelt memoir that will change the way you look your community, the obstacles in your own life and the American Dream. An inspiration, a must read.” (Robert Redford) “[Liz Murray] reminds us that the greatest acts of love and failure can occur side by side; that isolation and loss can give way to accomplishment and promise. She offers the awesome hope that, regardless of its past, a life can go beyond endurance and reach for triumph. She leave us with the memory of a child who clung to and refused to surrender the dignity of her soul.” (Andrew Bridge, author of the *New York Times* bestseller *Hope’s Boy*) “As much as it is a memoir, *Breaking Night* is a primer on how poverty and drug abuse create a heartbreaking underclass of children, one that goes largely unnoticed. By the truly uplifting ending, Liz Murray has shown us the worst, and the very best, of America.” (Haven Kimmel, author of *A Girl Named Zippy* and *She Got Up Off the Couch*) In the vein of *The Glass Castle, Breaking Night* is the stunning memoir of a young woman who at age fifteen was living on the streets, and who eventually made it into Harvard. Liz Murray was born to loving but drug-addicted parents in the Bronx. In school she was taunted for her dirty clothing and lice-infested hair, eventually skipping so many classes that she was put into a girls’ home. At age fifteen, Liz found herself on the streets when her family finally unraveled. She learned to scrape by, foraging for food and riding subways all night to have a warm place to sleep. When Liz’s mother died of AIDS, she decided to take control of her own destiny and go back to high school, often completing her assignments in the hallways and subway stations where she slept. Liz squeezed four years of high school into two, while homeless; won a *New York Times* scholarship; and made it into the Ivy League. *Breaking Night* is an unforgettable and beautifully written story of one young woman’s indomitable spirit to survive and prevail, against all odds.

Breakfast of Champions

SUMMARY: Breakfast Of Champions is vintage Vonnegut. One of his favorite characters, aging writer Kilgore Trout, finds to his horror that a Midwest car dealer is taking his fiction as truth. The result is murderously funny satire as Vonnegut looks at war, sex, racism, success, politics, and pollution in America and reminds us how to see the truth.

Break in

From Publishers Weekly

Francis’s 25th thriller is suavely handled and full of suspense. The narrator, Kit Fielding, wins handily as a steeple-chase jockey and enjoys the friendship of the princess who owns the horses he races. But trouble threatening his twin Holly and her husband Bobby Allardeck interrupts Kit’s routine. As horse trainers, the Allardecks are about to go bankrupt after a scandal sheet prints the false report that they can’t pay their debts. Determined to discover the motive for the attack, Kit enlists the help of people in the princess’s circle, which includes her niece, Danielle. A romance develops between the jockey and Danielle, interrupted by villains sent to kill him. Thanks to Kit, the Allardecks’ business is saved and he outwits the perpetrators of a shameful conspiracy. The love story, as well as the author’s colorful descriptions of English jump racing and newspaper tycoons, add zest to the intricate novel. Literary Guild and Reader’s Digest Condensed Books selections.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Suavely handled and full of suspense. — _Publishers Weekly_

Brave New World Revisited

In 1958, author Aldous Huxley wrote what some would call a sequel to his novel *Brave New World* (1932) but the sequel did not revisit the story or the characters. Instead, Huxley chose to revisit the world he created in a set of twelve essays in which he meditates on how his fantasy seemed to be becoming a reality and far more quickly than he ever imagined.
That Huxley’s book *Brave New World* had been largely prophetic about a dystopian future a great distress to Huxley. By 1958, Huxley was sixty-four-years old; the world had been transformed by the events of World War II and the terrifying advent of nuclear weapons. Peeking behind the Iron Curtain where people were not free but instead governed by Totalitarianism, Huxley could only bow to grim prophecy of his friend, author George Orwell, (author of the book *1984*). It struck Huxley that people were trading their freedom and individualism in exchange for the illusory comfort of sensory pleasure–just as he had predicted in *Brave New World*.
Huxley despairs of contemporary humankind’s willingness to surrender freedom for pleasure. Huxley worried that the rallying cry, “Give me liberty or give me death” could be easily replaced by “Give me television and hamburgers, but don’t bother me with the responsibilities of liberty.” Huxley saw hope in education; education that could teach people to see beyond the easy slogans and efficient ends and anesthetic-like influence of propaganda.

Brave New World

SUMMARY:
Aldous Huxley’s tour de force, Brave New World is a darkly satiric vision of a “utopian” future—where humans are genetically bred and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively serve a ruling order. A powerful work of speculative fiction that has enthralled and terrified readers for generations, it remains remarkably relevant to this day as both a warning to be heeded as we head into tomorrow and as thought-provoking, satisfying entertainment.

Brave Girl Eating: A Family’s Struggle with Anorexia

SUMMARY: I’ve never had anorexia, but I know it well. I see it on the street, in the gaunt and sunken face, the bony chest, the spindly arms of an emaciated woman. I’ve come to recognize the flat look of despair, the hopelessness that follows, inevitably, from years of starvation. I think: “That could have been my daughter.” It wasn’t. It’s not. If I have anything to say about it, it won’t be. Millions of families are affected by eating disorders, which usually strike young women between the ages of fourteen and twenty. But current medical practice ties these families’ hands when it comes to helping their children recover. Conventional medical wisdom dictates separating the patient from the family and insists that “it’s not about the food,” even as a family watches a child waste away before their eyes. Harriet Brown shows how counterproductive–and heartbreaking–this approach is by telling her daughter’s story of anorexia. She describes how her family, with the support of an open-minded pediatrician and a therapist, helped her daughter recover using family-based treatment, also known as the Maudsley approach. Chronicling her daughter Kitty’s illness from the earliest warning signs, through its terrifying progression, and on toward recovery, Brown takes us on one family’s journey into the world of anorexia nervosa, where starvation threatened her daughter’s body and mind. But hope and love–of the ordinary, family-focused kind–shine through every decision and action she and her family took. “Brave Girl Eating” is essential reading for families and professionals alike, a guiding light for anyone who’s coping with this devastating disease.