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The Broken Eye

**The third book in the Lightbringer series, the blockbuster fantasy epic from international bestseller Brent Weeks**
As the old gods awaken and satrapies splinter, the Chromeria races to find the only man who might still end a civil war before it engulfs the known world. But Gavin Guile has been captured by an old enemy and enslaved on a pirate galley. Worse still, Gavin has lost more than his powers as Prism – he can’t use magic at all.
Without the protection of his father, Kip Guile will face a master of shadows as his grandfather moves to choose a new Prism and put himself in power. With Teia and Karris, Kip will have to use all his wits to survive a secret war between noble houses, religious factions, rebels and an ascendant order of hidden assassins called The Broken Eye.
**’Brent Weeks is so good it’s beginning to tick me off’** Peter V. Brett
**’Weeks has a style of immediacy and detail that pulls the reader relentlessly into the story. He doesn’t allow you to look away’** Robin Hobb
**’I was mesmerised from start to finish. Unforgettable characters, a plot that kept me guessing, non-stop action and the kind of in-depth storytelling that makes me admire a writers’ work’** Terry Brooks
**’Weeks has truly cemented his place among the great epic fantasy writers of our time’** British Fantasy Society
Books by Brent Weeks
*Night Angel*
The Way of Shadows
Shadow’s Edge
Beyond the Shadows
Perfect Shadow (novella)
*Lightbringer*
The Black Prism
The Blinding Knife
The Broken Eye
The Blood Mirror
The Burning White

The Boundless Sea

**A *SUNDAY TIMES, FINANCIAL TIMES, THE TIMES* AND *BBC HISTORY MAGAZINE* BOOK OF THE YEAR**
**From the award-winning author of *The Great Sea* , a magnificent new global history of the oceans and of humankind’s relationship with the sea**
For most of human history, the seas and oceans have been the main means of long-distance trade and communication between peoples – for the spread of ideas and religion as well as commerce. This book traces the history of human movement and interaction around and across the world’s greatest bodies of water, charting our relationship with the oceans from the time of the first voyagers. David Abulafia begins with the earliest of seafaring societies – the Polynesians of the Pacific, the possessors of intuitive navigational skills long before the invention of the compass, who by the first century were trading between their far-flung islands. By the seventh century, trading routes stretched from the coasts of Arabia and Africa to southern China and Japan, bringing together the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific and linking half the world through the international spice trade. In the Atlantic, centuries before the little kingdom of Portugal carved out its powerful, seaborne empire, many peoples sought new lands across the sea – the Bretons, the Frisians and, most notably, the Vikings, now known to be the first Europeans to reach North America. As Portuguese supremacy dwindled in the late sixteenth century, the Spanish, the Dutch and then the British each successively ruled the waves.
Following merchants, explorers, pirates, cartographers and travellers in their quests for spices, gold, ivory, slaves, lands for settlement and knowledge of what lay beyond, Abulafia has created an extraordinary narrative of humanity and the oceans. From the earliest forays of peoples in hand-hewn canoes through uncharted waters to the routes now taken daily by supertankers in their thousands, *The Boundless Sea* shows how maritime networks came to form a continuum of interaction and interconnection across the globe: 90 per cent of global trade is still conducted by sea. This is history of the grandest scale and scope, and from a bracingly different perspective – not, as in most global histories, from the land, but from the boundless seas.

The Body

**THE NUMBER ONE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER – *SUNDAY TIMES* SCIENCE BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019**
**_______**
**’A directory of wonders.’ *– The Guardian***
**’Jaw-dropping.’ *– The Times***
**’Classic, wry, gleeful Bryson…an entertaining and absolutely fact-rammed book.’ *– The Sunday Times***
**’ ** **It is a feat of narrative skill to bake so many facts into an entertaining and nutritious book.**** ‘** * **– The Daily Telegraph***
**_______**
**‘We spend our whole lives in one body and yet most of us have practically no idea how it works and what goes on inside it.** **The idea of the book is simply to try to understand the extraordinary contraption that is us.’**
Bill Bryson sets off to explore the human body, how it functions and its remarkable ability to heal itself. Full of extraordinary facts and astonishing stories *The Body: A Guide for Occupants* is a brilliant, often very funny attempt to understand the miracle of our physical and neurological make up.
A wonderful successor to *A Short History of Nearly Everything* , this new book is an instant classic. It will have you marvelling at the form you occupy, and celebrating the genius of your existence, time and time again.
**‘** **What I learned is that we are infinitely more complex and wondrous, and often more mysterious, than I had ever suspected. There really is no story more amazing than the story of us.’ Bill Bryson**

The Blinding Knife

**The second book in the Lightbringer series, the blockbuster fantasy epic from international bestseller Brent Weeks**
Gavin Guile is dying.
He’d thought he had five years left – now he’s got less than one. With fifty thousand refugees, a bastard son and an ex-fiancée who may have learned his darkest secret, Gavin’s got problems on every side.
As he loses control, the world’s magic runs wild, threatening to destroy the Seven Satrapies. The old gods are being reborn and their army of colour wights is unstoppable.
The only salvation may be the brother whose freedom and life Gavin stole sixteen years ago.
**’Brent Weeks is so good it’s beginning to tick me off’** Peter V. Brett
**’Weeks has a style of immediacy and detail that pulls the reader relentlessly into the story. He doesn’t allow you to look away’** Robin Hobb
**’I was mesmerised from start to finish. Unforgettable characters, a plot that kept me guessing, non-stop action and the kind of in-depth storytelling that makes me admire a writers’ work’** Terry Brooks
**’Weeks has truly cemented his place among the great epic fantasy writers of our time’** British Fantasy Society
Books by Brent Weeks
*Night Angel*
The Way of Shadows
Shadow’s Edge
Beyond the Shadows
Perfect Shadow (novella)
*Lightbringer*
The Black Prism
The Blinding Knife
The Broken Eye
The Blood Mirror
The Burning White

The Battle of the Nile

**Part of the ALL-NEW LADYBIRD EXPERT SERIES**
\- Why was the Battle of the Nile so decisive in the French Revolutionary Wars?
\- Why did the French believe they were unassailable?
\- And why did Nelson and the British win?
TRACK the revolutionary roots and dramatic turning points of the British Royal Navy’s glorious victory over the French naval expedition to Egypt. From Napoleon’s rise to prominence to Nelson’s celebrated tactical leadership, discover how this significant battle changed the face of the French Revolutionary Wars.
THE BATTLE THAT CHANGED THE BALANCE OF POWER IN EUROPE
Written by historian, archaeologist, and broadcaster Sam Willis, *Nelson: Battle of the Nile* is a thrilling and accessible account of the naval battle that established Nelson’s fame.

The Artist in the Machine

**An authority on creativity introduces us to AI-powered computers that are creating art, literature, and music that may well surpass the creations of humans.**
Today’s computers are composing music that sounds “more Bach than Bach,” turning photographs into paintings in the style of Van Gogh’s *Starry Night* , and even writing screenplays. But are computers truly creative—or are they merely tools to be used by musicians, artists, and writers? In this book, Arthur I. Miller takes us on a tour of creativity in the age of machines.
Miller, an authority on creativity, identifies the key factors essential to the creative process, from “the need for introspection” to “the ability to discover the key problem.” He talks to people on the cutting edge of artificial intelligence, encountering computers that mimic the brain and machines that have defeated champions in chess, *Jeopardy!* , and Go. In the central part of the book, Miller explores the riches of computer-created art, introducing us to artists and computer scientists who have, among much else, unleashed an artificial neural network to create a nightmarish, multi-eyed dog-cat; taught AI to imagine; developed a robot that paints; created algorithms for poetry; and produced the world’s first computer-composed musical, *Beyond the Fence* , staged by Android Lloyd Webber and friends.
But, Miller writes, in order to be truly creative, machines will need to step into the world. He probes the nature of consciousness and speaks to researchers trying to develop emotions and consciousness in computers. Miller argues that computers can already be as creative as humans—and someday will surpass us. But this is not a dystopian account; Miller celebrates the creative possibilities of artificial intelligence in art, music, and literature.

TensorFlow 2.0 Quick Start Guide

**Perform supervised and unsupervised machine learning and learn advanced techniques such as training neural networks.**
#### Key Features
* Train your own models for effective prediction, using high-level Keras API
* Perform supervised and unsupervised machine learning and learn advanced techniques such as training neural networks
* Get acquainted with some new practices introduced in TensorFlow 2.0 Alpha

#### Book Description
TensorFlow is one of the most popular machine learning frameworks in Python. With this book, you will improve your knowledge of some of the latest TensorFlow features and will be able to perform supervised and unsupervised machine learning and also train neural networks.
After giving you an overview of what’s new in TensorFlow 2.0 Alpha, the book moves on to setting up your machine learning environment using the TensorFlow library. You will perform popular supervised machine learning tasks using techniques such as linear regression, logistic regression, and clustering.
You will get familiar with unsupervised learning for autoencoder applications. The book will also show you how to train effective neural networks using straightforward examples in a variety of different domains.
By the end of the book, you will have been exposed to a large variety of machine learning and neural network TensorFlow techniques.
#### What you will learn
* Use tf.Keras for fast prototyping, building, and training deep learning neural network models
* Easily convert your TensorFlow 1.12 applications to TensorFlow 2.0-compatible files
* Use TensorFlow to tackle traditional supervised and unsupervised machine learning applications
* Understand image recognition techniques using TensorFlow
* Perform neural style transfer for image hybridization using a neural network
* Code a recurrent neural network in TensorFlow to perform text-style generation

#### Who this book is for
Data scientists, machine learning developers, and deep learning enthusiasts looking to quickly get started with TensorFlow 2 will find this book useful. Some Python programming experience with version 3.6 or later, along with a familiarity with Jupyter notebooks will be an added advantage. Exposure to machine learning and neural network techniques would also be helpful.

Tapestries

Tapestries have been an enigmatic form of artwork for hundreds of years, with the intricate symbolism of their woven narratives still fascinating viewers today. Unicorns and fantastic beasts rub shoulders with well-heeled aristocrats; famous biblical and saintly stories are played out; allegorical figures, gods and goddesses recline in classical landscapes; and the arms and military achievements of wealthy patrons are depicted in sparkling glory. However, far from being an outdated craft, tapestries continue to be woven to this day, both by talented amateurs in their homes and by highly skilled artisans in studios and workshops around the world. In this beautiful illustrated introduction to the history of tapestries, Rosita Sheen reveals the fascinating story of these masterpieces, exploring their conception, manufacture, and symbolism right up to the present day.

Tales of Space and Time

There was, until a year ago, a little and very grimy-looking shop near Seven Dials, over which, in weather-worn yellow lettering, the name of “C. Cave, Naturalist and Dealer in Antiquities,” was inscribed. The contents of its window were curiously variegated. They comprised some elephant tusks and an imperfect set of chessmen, beads and weapons, a box of eyes, two skulls of tigers and one human, several moth-eaten stuffed monkeys (one holding a lamp), an old-fashioned cabinet, a flyblown ostrich egg or so, some fishing-tackle, and an extraordinarily dirty, empty glass fish-tank. There was also, at the moment the story begins, a mass of crystal, worked into the shape of an egg and brilliantly polished. And at that two people, who stood outside the window, were looking, one of them a tall, thin clergyman, the other a black-bearded young man of dusky complexion and unobtrusive costume. The dusky young man spoke with eager gesticulation, and seemed anxious for his companion to purchase the article. While they were there, Mr. Cave came into his shop, his beard still wagging with the bread and butter of his tea. When he saw these men and the object of their regard, his countenance fell. He glanced guiltily over his shoulder, and softly shut the door. He was a little old man, with pale face and peculiar watery blue eyes; his hair was a dirty grey, and he wore a shabby blue frock coat, an ancient silk hat, and carpet slippers very much down at heel. He remained watching the two men as they talked. The clergyman went deep into his trouser pocket, examined a handful of money, and showed his teeth in an agreeable smile. Mr. Cave seemed still more depressed when they came into the shop. The clergyman, without any ceremony, asked the price of the crystal egg. Mr. Cave glanced nervously towards the door leading into the parlour, and said five pounds. The clergyman protested that the price was high, to his companion as well as to Mr. Cave—it was, indeed, very much more than Mr. Cave had intended to ask, when he had stocked the article—and an attempt at bargaining ensued. Mr. Cave stepped to the shop-door, and held it open. “Five pounds is my price,” he said, as though he wished to save himself the trouble of unprofitable discussion. As he did so, the upper portion of a woman’s face appeared above the blind in the glass upper panel of the door leading into the parlour, and stared curiously at the two customers. “Five pounds is my price,” said Mr. Cave, with a quiver in his voice. The swarthy young man had so far remained a spectator, watching Cave keenly. Now he spoke. “Give him five pounds,” he said. The clergyman glanced at him to see if he were in earnest, and, when he looked at Mr. Cave again, he saw that the latter’s face was white. “It’s a lot of money,” said the clergyman, and, diving into his pocket, began counting his resources. He had little more than thirty shillings, and he appealed to his companion, with whom he seemed to be on terms of considerable intimacy. This gave Mr. Cave an opportunity of collecting his thoughts, and he began to explain in an agitated manner that the crystal was not, as a matter of fact, entirely free for sale. His two customers were naturally surprised at this, and inquired why he had not thought of that before he began to bargain. Mr. Cave became confused, but he stuck to his story, that the crystal was not in the market that afternoon, that a probable purchaser of it had already appeared. The two, treating this as an attempt to raise the price still further, made as if they would leave the shop. But at this point the parlour door opened, and the owner of the dark fringe and the little eyes appeared.