7761–7776 di 65579 risultati

Three Stations: An Arkady Renko Novel

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **A passenger train hurtling through the night. An unwed teenage mother headed to Moscow to seek a new life. A cruel-hearted soldier looking furtively, forcibly, for sex. An infant disappearing without a trace. **So begins Martin Cruz Smith’s masterful *Three Stations*, a suspenseful, intricately constructed novel featuring Investigator Arkady Renko. For the last three decades, beginning with the trailblazing *Gorky Park*, Renko (and Smith) have captivated readers with detective tales set in Russia. Renko is the ironic, brilliantly observant cop who finds solutions to heinous crimes when other lawmen refuse to even acknowledge that crimes have occurred. He uses his biting humor and intuitive leaps to fight not only wrongdoers but the corrupt state apparatus as well. In *Three Stations*, Renko’s skills are put to their most severe test. Though he has been technically suspended from the prosecutor’s office for once again turning up unpleasant truths, he strives to solve a last case: the death of an elegant young woman whose body is found in a construction trailer on the perimeter of Moscow’s main rail hub. It looks like a simple drug overdose to everyone—except to Renko, whose examination of the crime scene turns up some inexplicable clues, most notably an invitation to Russia’s premier charity ball, the billionaires’ Nijinksy Fair. Thus a sordid death becomes interwoven with the lifestyles of Moscow’s rich and famous, many of whom are clinging to their cash in the face of Putin’s crackdown on the very oligarchs who placed him in power. Renko uncovers a web of death, money, madness and a kidnapping that threatens the woman he is coming to love and the lives of children he is desperate to protect. In *Three Stations*, Smith produces a complex and haunting vision of an emergent Russia’s secret underclass of street urchins, greedy thugs and a bureaucracy still paralyzed by power and fear.* *

Three Philosophies of Life

“I’ve been a philosopher for all my adult life and the three most profound books of philosophy that I have ever read are Ecclesiastes, Job, and Song of Songs.” These are the opening lines of Kreeft’s Three Philosophies of Life. He reflects that there are ultimately only three philosophies of life and each one is represented by one of these books of the Bible-life is vanity; life is suffering; life is love.
In these three books Kreeft shows how we have Dante’s great epic The Divine Comedy played out, from Hell to Purgatory to Heaven. But it is an epic played out in our hearts and lives, here and now. Just as there is movement in Dante’s epic, so there is movement in these books, from Ecclesiates to Job, from Job to Song of Songs. Love is the final answer to Ecclesiastes’ quest, the alternative to vanity, and the true meaning of life. Finally, Kreeft sees in these books the epitome of theological virtues of faith, hope and love and “an essential summary of the spiritual history of the world”.
**
### Sinossi
“I’ve been a philosopher for all my adult life and the three most profound books of philosophy that I have ever read are Ecclesiastes, Job, and Song of Songs.” These are the opening lines of Kreeft’s Three Philosophies of Life. He reflects that there are ultimately only three philosophies of life and each one is represented by one of these books of the Bible-life is vanity; life is suffering; life is love.
In these three books Kreeft shows how we have Dante’s great epic The Divine Comedy played out, from Hell to Purgatory to Heaven. But it is an epic played out in our hearts and lives, here and now. Just as there is movement in Dante’s epic, so there is movement in these books, from Ecclesiates to Job, from Job to Song of Songs. Love is the final answer to Ecclesiastes’ quest, the alternative to vanity, and the true meaning of life. Finally, Kreeft sees in these books the epitome of theological virtues of faith, hope and love and “an essential summary of the spiritual history of the world”.

Those Who Save Us

SUMMARY: For fifty years, Anna Schlemmer has refused to talk about her life in Germany during World War II. Her daughter, Trudy, was only three when she and her mother were liberated by an American soldier and went to live with him in Minnesota. Trudy’s sole evidence of the past is an old photograph: a family portrait showing Anna, Trudy, and a Nazi officer, the Obersturmfuhrer of Buchenwald. Driven by the guilt of her heritage, Trudy, now a professor of German history, begins investigating the past and finally unearths the dramatic and heartbreaking truth of her mother’s life. Combining a passionate, doomed love story, a vivid evocation of life during the war, and a poignant mother/daughter drama, Those Who Save Us is a profound exploration of what we endure to survive and the legacy of shame.

This Lullaby

EDITORIAL REVIEW: When it comes to relationships, Remy doesn’t mess around. After all, she’s learned all there is to know from her mother, who’s currently working on husband number five. But there’s something about Dexter that seems to defy all of Remy’s rules. He certainly doesn’t *seem* like Mr. Right. For some reason, however, Remy just can’t seem to shake him. Could it be that Remy’s starting to understand what those love songs are all about? From acclaimed author Sarah Dessen, this is a captivating novel about a tough-as-nails girl and the unexpectedly charming boy who’s determined to soften her up.

This Is Where We Live

From Publishers Weekly

Married 30-something artists Claudia and Jeremy Munger are the unlucky anchors of Brown’s shaky sophomore novel, an of-the-moment time capsule in the mold of her well-received All We Ever Wanted Was Everything. Claudia is a filmmaker whose first feature is about to be released; Jeremy is a musician on the brink of mainstream success; together they are living in boho splendor in a newly purchased L.A. bungalow. But when Claudia’s film bombs, Jeremy’s band breaks up, their adjustable rate mortgage balloons, and Jeremy’s famous painter ex-girlfriend, Aoki, comes back on the scene, the Mungers’ sense of themselves is harshly tested. The gauntlets the Mungers face verge on Kafkaesque, yet the novel proceeds with painful earnestness. Particularly detracting are the one-note supporting characters: Jeremy and Claudia’s parents, an annoying roommate, the corpulent potential producer of Claudia’s next film. Aoki, meanwhile, plays a pivotal role but is burdened with a heavy load of temperamental artist clichés. There are lovely small moments—Claudia’s awkward run-in with a former student, for instance—that give hope that the undeniably talented author will find her footing again after this flawed effort. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From

Brown’s skillful follow-up to her well-received debut (All We Ever Wanted Was Everything, 2008) is set in L.A. and opens with a minor earthquake, signaling the fissure that’s about to open up in the marriage between Claudia, an aspiring filmmaker, and Jeremy, an aspiring musician. Career setbacks and the reappearance of Jeremy’s former flame aren’t the only cracks in their foundation. The couple is also saddled with debt, and foreclosure looms. Their differing reactions to this crisis suggest how far both are willing to compromise their dreams to save their home. Alternating between Claudia’s and Jeremy’s perspectives, Brown proves adept at fully inhabiting both male and female characters in her sympathetic portrait of a troubled marriage. She also elevates her material with sharp cultural observations and pointed commentary on the current economy while gamely tackling what it means to be a grown-up and how our idea of who we think we should be gets in the way of who we really are. At once playful and heartbreaking, this novel never feels less than wholly true. –Patty Wetli

This Day All Gods Die

Amazon.com Review

Tough-as-nails Morn Hyland, pirate-turned-cyborg Angus Thermopyle, and the whole crew from the United Mining Company Police are back in the final book of the Gap series, This Day All Gods Die. The Gap plot has raced through the galaxy at breakneck speeds, and the conclusion is no exception.

Morn, her alien-grown son Davies, geneticist/engineer Vector Sheed, competent Mikka, and her cabin-boy brother Ciro wait aboard Trumpet. Angus lies unconscious, possibly in permanent stasis. Ciro plots to destroy the ship, driven insane by the knowledge that alien mutagens have been shot into him by Nick Succorso’s sworn enemy, Sorus Chatelaine. Following nearby, Min Donner, faithful head of the UMCP Executive Division, watches the action and grits her teeth aboard Captain Dolph’s battle-fatigued Punisher. Will Morn trust her? Will her voice commands over Angus’s programming prevail? Who has survived the strange journey and battles since leaving the Lab? Back at United Mining headquarters, the Dragon and UMCP Chief Warden Dios’s strange, twisted duel of manipulation, assassination, and corruption comes to a head when an Amnion warship sets course for Earth… and that’s just the first few pages.

Get set for more of the action, betrayal, characterizataion, intrigue, corruption, and adventure you’ve enjoyed in the previous Gap books. If it has been a few years since you read the last installment, you may have trouble remembering some names and particularly insidious points of plot and government intrigue; you may even be tempted to reread the preceding books. Also troubling is Angus’s continual rumination of a couple phrases, including “We’ve committed a crime against your soul” and “It’s got to stop.” However, you may be reading so fast you won’t notice.

From Publishers Weekly

Drawing on a rich vein of science fiction, Donaldson brings to a resounding, though not triumphant, conclusion his Gap series, begun with The Gap into Conflict (1992) and continued through The Gap into Madness (1994). The struggle between Warden Dios, director of the United Mining Companies Police, and Horst Fasner, CEO of United Mining Companies itself, reaches a climax here. So does the tension between the human race and the alien Amnion, exacerbated by human development of a drug that prevents people from being mutated into the aliens. Meanwhile, much-victimized Morn Hyland and her motley crew are heading for Earth and arrive at the same time as an Amnion warship. The first third of the novel wins no marks for pacing, but later portions pick up speed, with the final battles near Earth satisfying all requirements for logic, excitement and catharsis. Donaldson’s usual weaknesses are in evidence: substitution of scenery-chewing and angst for characterization, and an abundance of prolix passages. Too, this volume may confound those new to the series. But it’s a crowd-pleasing story told on a grand scale, SF adventure with a genuinely galactic feel.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

This Child Will Be Great

From Publishers Weekly

Forbes lists Sirleaf, the 23rd president of Liberia and the first elected female president on the African continent, among the 100 Most Powerful Women in 2008. In and out of government, in and out of exile, but consistent in her commitment to Liberia, Sirleaf in her memoir reveals herself to be among the most resilient, determined and courageous as well. She writes with modesty in a calm and measured tone. While her account includes a happy childhood and an unhappy marriage, the book is politically, not personally, focused as she (and Liberia) go through the disastrous presidencies of Samuel Doe and Charles Taylor. Sirleaf’s training as an economist and her employment (e.g., in banking, as minister of finance in Liberia, and in U.N. development programs) informs the perspective from which she views internal Liberian history (e.g., the tensions between the settler class and the indigenous people) and Liberia’s international relations. Although her focus is thoroughly on Liberia, the content is more widely instructive, particularly her account of the role of the Economic Community of West African States. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From

Africa’s first elected female president, Sirleaf chronicles her rise from an abused young wife and mother to a woman with a career in government finance and international banking to the president of Liberia since 2006. Sirleaf confronted corruption and incompetence through several Liberian governments and suffered imprisonment and exile for her controversial positions before ultimately returning and challenging the long and troubled history of her nation. Liberia was created by the U.S. to repatriate former slaves, creating a tension between Americo-Liberians and indigenous peoples that continues. She recounts her struggles at home and abroad; she watched dictator Samuel Doe and later Charles Taylor destroy Liberia while she continued to criticize U.S. involvement with corrupt regimes. Having no colonial power to overcome, Sirleaf contends that Liberia has often struggled to develop and maintain a sense of true national integration, something she has sought to achieve as she has worked to bring economic and social stability to her civil-war-torn nation. An inspiring inside look at a nation struggling to rebuild itself and the woman now behind those efforts. –Vanessa Bush

This Changes Everything

Naomi Klein’s new international bestseller This Changes Everything is a must-read on our future, one of the defining and most hopeful books of this era
Forget everything you think you know about global warming. It’s not about carbon – it’s about capitalism. The good news is that we can seize this crisis to transform our failed economic system and build something radically better.
Once a decade, Naomi Klein writes a book that redefines its era. No Logo did so for globalization. The Shock Doctrine changed the way we think about austerity. In This Changes Everything, her most provocative and optimistic book yet, Naomi Klein has upended the debate about the stormy era already upon us, exposing the myths that are clouding the climate debate.

Read more at http://www.penguin.co.uk/books/this-changes-everything/9780241956182/#ZjK3IF0EEG89qPxo.99
**Recensie(s)**

I have devoured Naomi Klein’s This Changes Everything, the book the world has been waiting for. I urge everyone to read it (especially politicians). It is her most prescient book yet and is a much-needed call to arms as time runs out on climate change — Cornelia Parker * Observer, Books of the Year * It’s no exaggeration to say This Changes Everything is the most important book I’ve read all year – perhaps in a decade. Klein sets out the scientific case for urgent action on climate change and argues passionately that our only hope of combating its effects is a revolution in our entire economic system. Crucially, she manages to leave the reader with a degree of optimism — Stephanie Merritt * Observer, Books of the Year * [T]he problems – climate change, plus everything that is changing as a result, plus the increasing toxicity of the planet – can no longer be denied. This is a conversation that needs to happen on a large scale, and on a local scale, and on a personal scale, very soon — Margaret Atwood * Guardian, Books of the Year * A desperately needed wake-up call for people like me, exposing why the threat is real and pressing – but also demonstrating why it offers an incredible opportunity to rebuild our world and create a new generation of sustainable jobs. The book is a warning. It has to be heeded — Owen Jones * New Statesman, Books of the Year * Captured the collective sense of anger and awakening … [a] frightening look at climate change and capitalism — Matt Haig * Observer, Books of the Year * Klein brings in the weight of her knowledge and passion to show us the full force of the environmental destruction that we live in now – and, incredibly, gives us some hope regarding what could be done for the future * Flavorwire, Best Nonfiction Books of 2014 * A book of such ambition and consequence it is almost unreviewable … The most momentous and contentious environmental book since Silent Spring * New York Times Book Review * Naomi Klein applies her fine, fierce, and meticulous mind to the greatest, most urgent questions of our times. . . . I count her among the most inspirational political thinkers in the world today — Arundhati Roy, author of The God of Small Things and Capitalism: A Ghost Story Without a doubt one of the most important books of the decade — Amitav Ghosh Will be one of the most influential books of our time — Owen Jones Klein is a brave and passionate writer who always deserves to be heard, and this is a powerful and urgent book * Observer * Savages the idea that we will be saved by new technologies or by an incremental shift away from fossil fuels… Her solution requires a radical reconfiguration of our economic system * New York Times * What makes Klein’s books so excellent is that she is able to tackle seemingly intractable problems with control and precision, examining and making available their key contours to the interested reader. Klein is not paralyzed by enormous, fundamental, systematic problems. Instead, she excels at dissecting them. Such was true of No Logo and The Shock Doctrine, and the same can be said with This Changes Everything. No one could have been better chosen to bring such an unsettling issue to the mainstream than Klein. The result is an excellent and plausible balance between fear and hope, and a call for social activism as one means to begin to convince our governments to actively address the current climate crisis * Huffington Post * The book has an uplifting message: that humans have changed before, and can change again. It poses a gutsy challenge to those who are vaguely hoping that the whole issue will go away, or that some new technology will save us * Sunday Times * Her task is to take a potential catastrophe of unimaginable reach and to be calm and welcoming, drawing new people in. She does vast amounts of travel and research and thinking, then crafts all of it to the scale of her own voice: the voice of a pleasant, funny, unthreatening-looking woman * Guardian * The proposition that the world’s political and economic institutions are preventing us from meeting the lethal challenge of global warming is hardly novel. But Naomi Klein in her new book articulates the case as forcefully and comprehensively as anyone has yet managed * Independent * This may be the first truly honest book ever written about climate change * Time * An intellectual hero of many in the alter-globalization protests as well as the Occupy movement. . . Klein is ready for battle and is not afraid to own her politics * Los Angeles Review of Books * Powerfully and uncompromisingly written, the impassioned polemic we have come to expect from Klein, mixing first-hand accounts of events around the world and withering political analysis . . . Her stirring vision is nothing less than a political, economic, social, cultural and moral make-over of the human world * New Scientist * Klein is one of the left’s most influential figures and a prominent climate champion. . . . [She] is a gifted writer and there is little doubt about the problem she identifies * Financial Times * Gripping and dramatic . . . [Klein] writes of a decisive battle for the fate of the earth in which we either take back control of the planet from the capitalists who are destroying it or watch it all burn * Rolling Stone * An energetic exploration of issues surrounding climate change vociferously advocates immediate, radical reforms… The distinctiveness of the book resides… in its immersive reporting (on Blockadia eco-movements and futuristic geoengineering proposals) and in Klein’s sheer outspokenness * New Yorker * Klein has, with this book, thoroughly and completely debunked everything promoted under the banner of conservatism today – and she has done so with a work that’s more powerful than a stack of C4. This Changes Everything deserves to be viewed not as one of the greatest nonfiction works of the 2010s, but as one of the greatest nonfiction works of all-time. … This book will expand and intensify the worldwide climate-justice movement, which is why the rhetorical attacks on Klein will become ever more aggressive. It will politically galvanize the young and the vulnerable, who have so much to lose due to the climate crisis. It will create climate leaders across this warming globe. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate is not just a book, not just a moment, not just a movement. It is a weapon of justice. It is a path of survival * Washington Monthly * Naomi Klein is a genius. She has done for politics what Jared Diamond did for the study of human history. She skillfully blends politics, economics and history and distills out simple and powerful truths with universal applicability — Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Today @NaomiAKlein’s new book #ThisChangesEverything is out now – I’m reading it – it’s great — Russell Brand Clearly written and articulate … Klein identifies that at its core the fight on climate change is a fight between two very different ways at looking at the world. And what is at stake is the future of humanity and the nature we all depend on… An important read. In my view Klein is right. The demarcation lines are clearer than ever. If we are to win the fight against climate change we will need to fundamentally change the world * Friends of the Earth * This is the best book about climate change in a very long time-in large part because it’s about much more. It sets the most important crisis in human history in the context of our other ongoing traumas, reminding us just how much the powers-that-be depend on the power of coal, gas and oil. And that in turn should give us hope, because it means the fight for a just world is the same as the fight for a liveable one — Bill McKibben author of The End of Nature and co-founder of 350.org [Her] words and knowledge run deep, inspiring change and the need for immediate action — Charlize Theron The manifesto that the climate movement – and the planet – needs right now… For those with whom her message does resonate – and they are likely to be legion – her book could help catalyze the kind of mass movement she argues the world needs now * San Francisco Gate * A controversial and thoroughly researched challenge to neoliberal ideology * Chicago Tribune * Has the potential to be the definitive account of our current moment… Klein’s great gifts have always been synthesizing huge amounts of information and drawing connections between seemingly disparate issues; on those points, This Changes Everything is no different * The Globe and Mail * A wonderful book narrated by a likeable, really smart and sometimes funny author who makes her readers feel smart, too. It provides us sufficient reasons for the imperative to recreate our economic world in ways that align it with our physical world and our only home. And, in broad strokes, it shows us how — Sandra Steingraber, Science Advisor for Americans against Fracking, Ecowatch Klein is a master at unpacking myths and contradictions, wherever their origins lie on the political spectrum * In These Times * When she harnesses her rage at humanity’s inability to see what is right in front of us, she is no mere polemicist or propagandist. She is a force of nature * Quill & Quire * A sharp analysis that is bound to be widely discussed * Kirkus Reviews * An enormous, complex, compelling, and, by turns, distressing and rallying analysis of the dysfunctional symbiotic relationships between free-market capitalism, the fossil fuels industry, and global warming * Booklist * The beauty of this book is that suddenly, imagining a different world – tragically diminished in some ways, yes, but deeply inspiring in others – doesn’t seem quite so much like an act of fantasy * Truth Out * Meticulously researched and briskly rational in tone, [it] is one of the basic texts of the modern era… an essential purchase in that it tells you precisely what you need to know to discuss the climate dilemma intelligently… This Changes Everything is basic reading and no one will take you seriously until you’ve read every single page * Toronto Star * A polemicist of great distinction… she challenges the reader to become engaged in society’s response to climate change * Manly Daily * Klein’s most ambitious and urgent book … essential reading for anyone who cares about the future of life on earth * Weekend Australian *
(source: Bol.com)

Thinking in pictures: and other reports from my life with autism

Review

“I hardly know what to say about this remarkable book. . . It provides a way to understand the many kinds of sentience, human and animal, that adorn the earth.” –Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, author of The Hidden Life of Dogs

“There are innumerable astounding facets to this remarkable book. . . . Displaying uncanny powers of observation . . . [Temple Grandin] charts the differences between her life and the lives of those who think in words.” –_The Philadelphia Inquirer_

“A uniquely fascinating view not just of autism but of animal–and human–thinking and feeling, [providing] insights that can only be called wisdom.”
–Deborah Tannen, author of You Just Don’t Understand

Product Description

Temple Grandin, Ph.D., is a gifted animal scientist who has designed one third of all the livestock-handling facilities in the United States. She also lectures widely on autism—because Temple Grandin is autistic, a woman who thinks, feels, and experiences the world in ways that are incomprehensible to the rest of us.

In this unprecedented book, Grandin delivers a report from the country of autism. Writing from the dual perspectives of a scientist and an autistic person, she tells us how that country is experienced by its inhabitants and how she managed to breach its boundaries to function in the outside world. What emerges in Thinking in Pictures is the document of an extraordinary human being, one who, in gracefully and lucidly bridging the gulf between her condition and our own, sheds light on the riddle of our common identity.

Think!

One of the most perfect examples of lateral thinking, a phrase Edward de Bono first introduced to the world way back in 1967, is the common or garden variety joke: a stated premise turned on its head to comic effect by the punchline, e.g. ‘A man walked into a bar…Ouch, you think he would have ducked’. More often than we realise, we think the way we’ve been taught to think and so, in some ways, are fated to make the same mistakes over and over again. Punchlines of jokes catch us by surprise because we so easily fall into the trap of thinking conventionally.In “Think!”, Edward de Bono argues that the way our minds function is a bit like trying to drive a car using only one wheel. There’s nothing wrong with that one wheel – conventional thinking – but we could all get a lot further if we used all four…By examining why we think the way we do from an historical perspective (Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, plus the Church, have a lot to answer for), how we think and, most importantly, how we can think better, he offers us the possibility of a solution to problems as big as how to halt global warming and bring peace to the Middle East to how to chat up the opposite sex and get ahead at work. As books such as Malcolm Gladwell’s “Blink” and “The Tipping Point” and James Surowiecki’s “The Wisdom of Crowds” have shown, big ‘concept’ books have an ever increasing market and a new book by the person who essentially invented the genre is a major publishing event. This is the man who is credited by their coach with inspiring the Australian cricket team to their biggest ever win over the English and who the world’s leading consultancy company, Accenture, chose as one of the fifty most influential business thinkers today. De Bono has an almost quasi-religious following among his devotees and is internationally renowned – this book brings his ideas into the 21st century and is sure to cause a splash

Think of a Number

SUMMARY: An extraordinary fiction debut, Think of a Number is an exquisitely plotted novel of suspense that grows relentlessly darker and more frightening as its pace accelerates, forcing its deeply troubled characters to moments of startling self-revelation. Arriving in the mail over a period of weeks are taunting letters that end with a simple declaration, “Think of any number…picture it…now see how well I know your secrets.”  Amazingly, those who comply find that the letter writer has predicted their random choice exactly.  For Dave Gurney, just retired as the NYPD’s top homicide investigator and forging a new life with his wife, Madeleine, in upstate New York, the letters are oddities that begin as a diverting puzzle but quickly ignite a massive serial murder investigation. What police are confronted with is a completely baffling killer, one who is fond of rhymes filled with threats and warnings, whose attention to detail is unprecedented, and who has an uncanny knack for disappearing into thin air.  Even more disturbing, the scale of his ambition seems to widen as events unfold. Brought in as an investigative consultant, Dave Gurney soon accomplishes deductive breakthroughs that leave local police in awe.  Yet, even as he matches wits with his seemingly clairvoyant opponent, Gurney’s tragedy-marred past rises up to haunt him, his marriage approaches a dangerous precipice, and finally, a dark, cold fear builds that he’s met an adversary who can’t be stopped. In the end, fighting to keep his bearings amid a whirlwind of menace and destruction, Gurney sees the truth of what he’s become – what we all become when guilty memories fester – and how his wife Madeleine’s clear-eyed advice may be the only answer that makes sense. A work that defies easy labels — at once a propulsive masterpiece of suspense and an absorbing immersion in the lives of characters so real we seem to hear their heartbeats – Think of a Number is a novel you’ll not soon forget.

Things That Matter

From America’s preeminent columnist, named by the Financial Timesthe most influential commentator in the nation, the long-awaited collection of Charles Krauthammer’s essential, timeless writings.
** **
A brilliant stylist known for an uncompromising honesty that challenges conventional wisdom at every turn, Krauthammer has for decades daz­zled readers with his keen insight into politics and government. His weekly column is a must-read in Washington and across the country. Now, finally, the best of Krauthammer’s intelligence, erudition and wit are collected in one volume.

Readers will find here not only the country’s leading conservative thinker offering a pas­sionate defense of limited government, but also a highly independent mind whose views—on feminism, evolution and the death penalty, for example—defy ideological convention. Things That Matter also features several of Krautham­mer’s major path-breaking essays—on bioeth­ics, on Jewish destiny and on America’s role as the world’s superpower—that have pro­foundly influenced the nation’s thoughts and policies. And finally, the collection presents a trove of always penetrating, often bemused re­flections on everything from border collies to Halley’s Comet, from Woody Allen to Win­ston Churchill, from the punishing pleasures of speed chess to the elegance of the perfectly thrown outfield assist.

With a special, highly autobiographical in­troduction in which Krauthammer reflects on the events that shaped his career and political philosophy, this indispensible chronicle takes the reader on a fascinating journey through the fashions and follies, the tragedies and triumphs, of the last three decades of American life.

(source: Bol.com)

The Thieves of Manhattan

The Thieves of Manhattan by Adam Langer
The famously false memoirs of James Frey may be yesterday’s news, but as this funny riff reminds us, literary fakes are as old as literature itself. Ian Minot is an aspiring writer who labors over short stories that seem destined to remain unread. His beautiful Romanian girlfriend, Anya Petrescu, finds success more easily—and leaves Ian for Blade Markham, a bloviating ex-gangbanger whose “so-called memoir” is a best-seller. When Ian is approached by ex-editor Jed Roth, who wants Ian to publish Jed’s pulpy tale of book theft and murder as a memoir, then renounce it, it’s a chance for both of them to get revenge: Jed on his former employer, and Ian on the world. Although Langer may be too cute for some (he employs made-up slang in which a penis is a portnoy), he does an engaging job with the hall-of-mirrors plot. And if readers can predict that the book they’re reading is the one that Ian ends up writing, they’ll never guess the ending. Just when you want a surprising twist, Langer delivers several.

Thief of Lives

EDITORIAL REVIEW: On the heels of DHAMPIR, Barb and J.C. Hendee’s acclaimed Fantasy debut, comes THIEF OF LIVES, the new novel featuring Magiere and Leesil, Slayers of the Undead…. Magiere the dhampir thinks that her nights of hunting vampires are over. After settling down in her newly adopted village of Miiska — now vampire-free, thanks to her and her half-elf partner, Leesil — she looks forward to quiet days tending to her tavern. But far away in the capital city of Bela, a prominent councilman’s daughter has been found dead on her own doorstep… and all signs point to a vampire. Knowing that the battered and burned village of Miiska could use an infusion of cash, Bela’s town council offers a generous bounty to the dhampir if she will slay their vampire. Magiere resists, wanting nothing more than to forget her past and ignore her half-vampire nature. Only Leesil can persuade Magiere to follow her destiny — before more innocent lives are claimed by darkness.

Thief of Light

Thief of Light by Denise Rossetti
**Some desires are impossible to resist…For fans of Laurel K. Hamilton and Shana Abé…  **
In the elegant, subtropical city of Caracole, Erik the Golden is widely known as irresistible; his Voice an instrument of incredible pleasure, the stroke of velvet on bare skin. But the Voice is a curse as much as a blessing, for once Erik used it to steal a soul, and now he must pay.
Pruella Takimori McGuire is the business manager for the beautiful courtesans of the Garden of Nocturnal Delights. She deals in numbers, not Magick, and when Erik turns his charms in her direction, she sees only vanity, not a golden gift. If Erik cannot use his power to win Prue’s heart, how can he truly possess her? How is it *she* can resist what others can’t? She’s either a torment devised by the gods to drive him mad or Erik’s last hope of salvation.

And all the while, a far darker power corrupts the foundations of Caracole—the Necromancer, who feasts on souls. When the Necromancer’s hired assassin kidnaps Prue, Erik must harness his air Magick to recover the woman he has come to love more than life itself.

Their Eyes Were Watching God

A PBS Great American Read Top 100 Pick
“A deeply soulful novel that comprehends love and cruelty, and separates the big people from the small of heart, without ever losing sympathy for those unfortunates who don’t know how to live properly.” —Zadie Smith
One of the most important and enduring books of the twentieth century, Their Eyes Were Watching God brings to life a Southern love story with the wit and pathos found only in the writing of Zora Neale Hurston. Out of print for almost thirty years—due largely to initial audiences’ rejection of its strong black female protagonist—Hurston’s classic has since its 1978 reissue become perhaps the most widely read and highly acclaimed novel in the canon of African-American literature.
**Recensie(s)**

Zora Neale Hurston was a knockout in her life, a wonderful writer and a fabulous person. Devilishly funny and academically solid: delicious mixture * Maya Angelou * There is no book more important to me than this one. It speaks to me as no novel, past or present, has ever done * Alice Walker * For me, Their Eyes Were Watching God is one of the very greatest American novels of the 20th century. It is so lyrical it should be sentimental; it is so passionate it should be overwrought, but it is instead a rigorous, convincing and dazzling piece of prose, as emotionally satisfying as it is impressive. There is no novel I love more * Zadie Smith *
(source: Bol.com)