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After the fire, a still small voice

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Set in the haunting landscape of eastern Australia, this is a stunningly accomplished debut novel about the inescapable past: the ineffable ties of family, the wars fought by fathers and sons, and what goes unsaid.After the departure of the woman he loves, Frank drives out to a shack by the ocean that he had last visited as a teenager. There, among the sugarcane and sand dunes, he struggles to rebuild his life.Forty years earlier, Leon is growing up in Sydney, turning out treacle tarts at his parents’ bakery and flirting with one of the local girls. But when he’s drafted to serve in Vietnam, he finds himself suddenly confronting the same experiences that haunt his war-veteran father.As these two stories weave around each other–each narrated in a voice as tender as it is fierce–we learn what binds Frank and Leon together, and what may end up keeping them apart.

After the Fall

Amazon.com Review

Kylie Ladd on After the Fall

Whenever I meet someone new and they ask me about my occupation I always reply that I’m a psychologist. It’s true. I’m a clinical neuropsychologist, to be precise, with a Ph.D. in the field and fifteen years’ experience working in both the public and private sectors. What I fail to mention–mostly because I still can’t quite believe that it’s true, and I’m stupidly afraid that saying it out loud will make it disappear–is that I’m also a writer.

I never planned to study psychology. At the time it simply seemed like a good compromise between the medical degree my parents wanted me to do and the arts degree I was keener on, but now I realize what a great fit it was. I have always been fascinated by people, and more specifically how we become who we are and why we make the choices we do. I’m also–as is true for most writers–rather a voyeur. Psychology gave me the tools to observe others; writing gives me the reason to do so.

Psychology has also helped me understand something I think every writer needs to grasp: that “story” is a fluid concept, depending wholly on perspective. In the clinic where I work, part of my role is to take a history from both the client and a member of his or her family. Though I have been doing so for many years, the process still has the power to surprise, given how differently the same events can be perceived and experienced by different people. It seems there is always some fresh way for us to love or hate, to accommodate or alienate each other; there are at least two sides to every story. Listening to my patients and their families gave me the idea for the narrative structure of After The Fall, where four main characters take turns at telling their side of a shared story.

Now that both my children are in school, I write three days a week and practice as a psychologist for two–but the distinction is often blurred. When I write, I am using the resources that psychology has given me; when I am seeing a client I am simultaneously alert for what I can learn from them about being human. In both cases, I am listening for story–the stories that explain and define us all.

From Publishers Weekly

Neuropsychologist Ladd’s flat debut is narrated by four Australians who make three pairs: Cary and Kate, and Luke and Cressida, two married couples—and Kate and Luke, who fall headlong into an affair that could have big consequences. Cary is a chivalrous doctor who desperately wants children, while his impetuous wife, Kate, an anthropologist, is the lusty life of every party. Then there’s Luke, the dashing ad man everyone falls in love with, and Cressida, his beautiful pediatrician wife, who is more dedicated to her patients than to her personal life. Short, snappy chapters alternate between the voices of these characters, building the story of the two marriages and the infidelity that dismantles them. Ladd can turn a phrase and spin a metaphor, but the characters are too thin to sustain sympathy, and little is done to find a new angle on the familiar setup of desire and adultery. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

After Midnight

From Publishers Weekly

Although Laymon died in 2001, his U.K. novels have only recently gotten an American release; this 1997 title is a sordid, flawed gem, both stomach churning and erotic, and not infrequently at the same time. Narrated by paranoid, defiant 26-year-old Alice, the book opens on a peaceful night of house-sitting—but as Alice warns, “You can never be sure it’s safe.” Indeed, shortly after midnight she spots a strange man emerge from the woods and go swimming naked in the family pool. A fortunately timed phone call that’s a wrong number gives Alice the chance to drive off the stranger, but sets in motion a 24-hour whirlwind of murder, terror and madness, beginning when Alice splits open someone’s head with a Civil War saber—and escalating precipitously from there. Alice’s matter-of-fact attitude toward her grisly handiwork can make her hard to sympathize with (“I felt rotten about killing him, but not particularly guilty”); supporting characters are easier to like, but don’t get too attached. As the night wears on, Laymon piles on gory details and violent sex with perverse, over-the-top glee; it’s definitely not for everyone and can strain credibility, but Alice proves to be one of Laymon’s most original and memorable protagonists, and should keep hardened horror fans reading well past the stroke of midnight. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Description

When Alice’s friend Serena goes away she stays in her house, with its sunken bathtub and big-screen TV. Best of all is the outdoor swimming pool. But one night a stranger walks out of the woods and jumps naked into the pool. Alice hopes he won’t be coming to get her, like so many have done before.

After dark

From Publishers Weekly

Murakami’s 12th work of fiction is darkly entertaining and more novella than novel. Taking place over seven hours of a Tokyo night, it intercuts three loosely related stories, linked by Murakami’s signature magical-realist absurd coincidences. When amateur trombonist and soon-to-be law student Tetsuya Takahashi walks into a late-night Denny’s, he espies Mari Asai, 19, sitting by herself, and proceeds to talk himself back into her acquaintance. Tetsuya was once interested in plain Mari’s gorgeous older sister, Eri, whom he courted, sort of, two summers previously. Murakami then cuts to Eri, asleep in what turns out to be some sort of menacing netherworld. Tetsuya leaves for overnight band practice, but soon a large, 30ish woman, Kaoru, comes into Denny’s asking for Mari: Mari speaks Chinese, and Kaoru needs to speak to the Chinese prostitute who has just been badly beaten up in the nearby “love hotel” Kaoru manages. Murakami’s omniscient looks at the lives of the sleeping Eri and the prostitute’s assailant, a salaryman named Shirakawa, are sheer padding, but the probing, wonderfully improvisational dialogues Mari has with Tetsuya, Kaoru and a hotel worker named Korogi sustain the book until the ambiguous, mostly upbeat dénouement. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From

Other than an unexpected cheerfulness, After Dark is classic Haruki Murakami, featuring themes of loneliness and alienation, carefully crafted characters, Western references (such as an all-night Denny’s where Hall & Oates plays in the background), and distinctive magical-realist twists of fate. Critics also praised the impassive, omniscient narration, like a constantly shifting video camera, which renders each scene in magnificent detail. The chief complaint was the brevity of the novel, and the Los Angeles Times felt that Eri’s dreamlike scenes missed the mark as well. “For the unfamiliar, it’s the perfect appetizer. For the established fan, it’s a quick work that is over far too soon” (_Denver Post_).

Copyright © 2004 Phillips & Nelson Media, Inc.

Aesop’s Fables

SUMMARY: Aesop’s Fables, by Aesop, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today’s top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader’s viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader’s understanding of these enduring works. As legend has it, the storyteller Aesop was a slave who lived in ancient Greece during the sixth century B.C. His memorable, recountable fables have brought amusing characters to life and driven home thought-provoking morals for generations of listeners and modern-day readers. Translated into countless languages and familiar to people around the world, Aesop’s fables never tarnish despite being told again and again. This collection presents nearly 300 of Aesop’s most entertaining and enduring stories—from “The Hare and the Tortoise” and “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse” to “The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs” and “The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing.” Populated by a colorful array of animal characters who personify every imaginable human type—from fiddling grasshoppers and diligent ants to sly foxes, wicked wolves, brave mice, and grateful lions—these timeless tales are as fresh and relevant today as when they were first created. Full of humor, insight, and wit, the tales in Aesop’s Fables champion the value of hard work and perseverance, compassion for others, and honesty. They are age-old wisdom in a delicious form, for the consumption of adults and children alike.D. L. Ashliman is emeritus professor at the University of Pittsburgh. He taught folklore, mythology, German, and comparative literature at that institution for thirty-one years. He has also served as guest professor at the University of Augsburg in Germany.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

CSF Publishing’s Classic Literature Collection includes title’s carefully updated and corrected from the original text, and features new enhancements such as the author’s complete biography and bibliography, story description, list of characters and their role in the story, and occasionally illustrations from antique editions. THE BOOK: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his famous detective and illustrated by Sidney Paget. These are the first of the Sherlock Holmes short stories, originally published as single stories in the Strand Magazine from July 1891 to June 1892. The book was published in England on 14 October 1892 by George Newnes Ltd and in a US Edition on 15 October by Harper. The initial combined print run was 14,500 copies. The book was banned in the Soviet Union in 1929 for the occultism of its author, although the book shows few to no signs of such material. Later, the embargo was lifted. THE AUTHOR: Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish physician and writer, most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, historical novels, plays and romances, poetry, and non-fiction.
(source: Bol.com)

The Adventures of Button

– Xlibris Podcast Part 1: http://www.xlibrispodcasts.com/adventures-of-button-broken-tail-1/
– Xlibris Podcast Part 2: http://www.xlibrispodcasts.com/adventures-of-button-broken-tail-2/
– Xlibris Podcast Part 3: http://www.xlibrispodcasts.com/adventures-of-button-broken-tail-3/
– Xlibris Podcast Part 4: http://www.xlibrispodcasts.com/adventures-of-button-broken-tail-4/
– Xlibris Podcast Part 5: http://www.xlibrispodcasts.com/adventures-of-button-broken-tail-5/
(source: Bol.com)

THE ADVENTURE OF THE YELLOW FACE

“The Adventure of the Yellow Face”, one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is the third tale from The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. It was first published in Strand Magazine in 1893 with original illustrations by Sidney Paget.
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(source: Bol.com)

The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist: No. 32

The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist: – Sherlock Holmes ILLUSTRATED EDITION Another adventure by the brilliant Sherlock Holmes, the world’s most famous detective is presented for mental stimulation and your enjoyment. Once again Holmes will come to the “only logical conclusion” as he solves yet another mystery. After all, “It’s elementary, Watson!” Sure to be enjoyed by all. Recommended by The Gunston Trust for Nonviolence in Literature for Children & Young Adults. Ages Adult & Young Adult+

The Adventure of the Gloria Scott

The Adventure of the Gloria Scott by Arthur Conan Doyle, Sidney Paget
The Adventure of the Gloria Scott, one of the 56 Sherlock Holmes short stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is one of 12 stories in the cycle collected as The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. It is chronologically the earliest case in Sherlock Holmes canon. This story is related mainly by Holmes rather than Watson, and is the first case to which Holmes applied his powers of deduction, having treated it as a mere hobby until this time.
Go BompaCrazy!
Conan Doyle was also a fervent advocate of justice and personally investigated two closed cases, which led to two men being exonerated of the crimes of which they were accused. The first case, in 1906, involved a shy half-British, half-Indian lawyer named George Edalji who had allegedly penned threatening letters and mutilated animals. Police were set on Edalji’s conviction, even though the mutilations continued after their suspect was jailed.
The second case, that of Oscar Slater, a German Jew and gambling-den operator convicted of bludgeoning an 82-year-old woman in Glasgow in 1908, excited Conan Doyle’s curiosity because of inconsistencies in the prosecution case and a general sense that Slater was not guilty. He ended up paying most of the costs for Slater’s successful appeal in 1928.

Adventure of the Christmas Pudding and other stories

First came a sinister warning to Poirot not to eat any plum pudding…then the discovery of corpse in chest…next, an overheard quarrel that led to murder…the strange case of the of the dead man who altered his eating habits..and the puzzle of the victim who dreamt his own suicide. What links these six baffling cases? The distinctive hand of the queen of crime fiction

Adriano in Siria Opera Drammatica Da Rappresentarsi Nel Regio Teatro Del Buon-Ritiro, Festeggiandosi Il Gloriosissimo Giorno Natalizio Di D Ferd

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfectionssuch as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed worksworldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to ensure edition identification: ++++ Adriano In Siria. Opera Drammatica Da Rappresentarsi Nel Regio Teatro Del Buon-Ritiro, Festeggiandosi Il Gloriosissimo Giorno Natalizio Di … D. Ferdinando VI … Pietro Metastasio en la oficina de Miguel Escrivano, 1757

Adam & Eve

What Happened To Eden?
The *New York Times* bestselling author of *Ahab’s Wife*, *Four Spirits*, and *Abundance* returns with a daring and provocative novel that envisions a world where science and faith contend for the allegiance of a new Adam & Eve.
Hours before his untimely—and highly suspicious—death, world-renowned astrophysicist Thom Bergmann shares his discovery of extraterrestrial life with his wife, Lucy. Feeling that the warring world is not ready to learn of—or accept—proof of life elsewhere in the universe, Thom entrusts Lucy with his computer flash drive, which holds the keys to his secret work.
Devastated by Thom’s death, Lucy keeps the secret, but Thom’s friend, anthropologist Pierre Saad, contacts Lucy with an unusual and dangerous request about another sensitive matter. Pierre needs Lucy to help him smuggle a newly discovered artifact out of Egypt: an ancient codex concerning the human authorship of the Book of Genesis. Offering a reinterpretation of the creation story, the document is sure to threaten the foundation of the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim religions . . . and there are those who will stop at nothing to suppress it.
Midway through the daring journey, Lucy’s small plane goes down on a slip of verdant land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in the Middle East. Burned in the crash landing, she is rescued by Adam, a delusional American soldier whose search for both spiritual and carnal knowledge has led to madness. Blessed with youth, beauty, and an unsettling innocence, Adam gently tends to Lucy’s wounds, and in this quiet, solitary paradise, a bond between the unlikely pair grows. Ultimately, Lucy and Adam forsake their half-mythical Eden and make their way back toward civilization, where members of an ultraconservative religious cult are determined to deprive the world of the knowledge Lucy carries.

Acts of Faith

SUMMARY: Philip Caputo’s tragic and epically ambitious new novel is set in Sudan, where war is a permanent condition. Into this desolate theater come aid workers, missionaries, and mercenaries of conscience whose courage and idealism sometimes coexist with treacherous moral blindness. There’s the entrepreneurial American pilot who goes from flying food and medicine to smuggling arms, the Kenyan aid worker who can’t help seeing the tawdry underside of his enterprise, and the evangelical Christian who comes to Sudan to redeem slaves and falls in love with a charismatic rebel commander. As their fates intersect and our understanding of their characters deepens, it becomes apparent that Acts of Faith is one of those rare novels that combine high moral seriousness with irresistible narrative wizardry.

Act of Will

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*Act of Will* is a boisterous fantasy adventure that introduces us to Will Hawthorne, a medieval actor and playwright who flees the authorities only to find himself inextricably bound to a group of high-minded adventurers on a deadly mission. Will travels with them to a distant land where they are charged with the investigation and defeat of a ruthless army of mystical horsemen, who appear out of the mist leaving death and devastation in their wake.
In the course of Will’s uneasy alliance with his new protectors, he has to get his pragmatic mind to accept selfless heroism (which he thinks is absurd) and magic (which he doesn’t believe in). Will must eventually decide where his loyalties really lie and how much he is prepared to do–and believe–to stand up for them.

(source: Bol.com)

Accidentally the Sheikh’s Wife

Accidentally the Sheikh’s Wife by Barbara McMahon
For Bethanne Saunders, flying Sheikh Rashid al Harum’s private plane has its perks. When her feet touch the ground it’s on the plush carpet of his sumptuous palace. And just being near gorgeous Rashid makes her feel on cloud nine!
Bethanne has all the luxury she can handle—until suddenly she’s promoted to princess! But the dazzling rock on her finger is a stark reminder that it’s a convenient engagement. Everyone knows sheikhs don’t fall for ordinary girls from Texas….