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Good Daughters

SUMMARY: They were born on the same day, in the same hospital, into families that could hardly have been less alike. Ruth is an artist and a romantic, with a rich and passionate imaginative life. Dana is a scientist and realist whose faith is firmly planted in what she can see or hear or touch. Yet these two very different women share the same struggle to make sense of their place in a world in which neither of them has ever truly felt she belonged. Told in the alternating voices of Ruth and Dana, The Good Daughters follows these “birthday sisters” as they make their way through the decades, from the 1950s to the present. Master storyteller Joyce Maynard chronicles the unlikely ways the two women’s lives intersect-from childhood and adolescence to first loves, first sex, marriage, and parenthood; from the deaths of parents to divorce, the loss of home, and the loss of a beloved partner-until an unavoidable moment when a long-held secret from the past alters everything….

The golden ratio: the story of phi, the world’s most astonishing number

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Throughout history, thinkers from mathematicians to theologians have pondered the mysterious relationship between numbers and the nature of reality. In this fascinating book, Mario Livio tells the tale of a number at the heart of that mystery: *phi*, or 1.6180339887…This curious mathematical relationship, widely known as “The Golden Ratio,” was discovered by Euclid more than two thousand years ago because of its crucial role in the construction of the pentagram, to which magical properties had been attributed. Since then it has shown a propensity to appear in the most astonishing variety of places, from mollusk shells, sunflower florets, and rose petals to the shape of the galaxy. Psychological studies have investigated whether the Golden Ratio is the most aesthetically pleasing proportion extant, and it has been asserted that the creators of the Pyramids and the Parthenon employed it. It is believed to feature in works of art from Leonardo da Vinci’s *Mona Lisa *to Salvador Dali’s *The Sacrament of the Last Supper*, and poets and composers have used it in their works. It has even been found to be connected to the behavior of the stock market!*The Golden Ratio* is a captivating journey through art and architecture, botany and biology, physics and mathematics. It tells the human story of numerous phi-fixated individuals, including the followers of Pythagoras who believed that this proportion revealed the hand of God; astronomer Johannes Kepler, who saw phi as the greatest treasure of geometry; such Renaissance thinkers as mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci of Pisa; and such masters of the modern world as Goethe, Cezanne, Bartok, and physicist Roger Penrose. Wherever his quest for the meaning of phi takes him, Mario Livio reveals the world as a place where order, beauty, and eternal mystery will always coexist.*From the Hardcover edition.*

The Gold Bat

This novel tells of how two boys, O’Hara and Moriarty, tar and feather a statue of the local M.P. as a prank. They get away with it, but O’Hara had borrowed a tiny gold cricket bat belonging to Trevor, the captain of the cricket team, and after the escapade he discovers that the trinket is missing. Schoolboy honor is at stake, and Trevor and his friends try to get the gold bat back.
(source: Bol.com)

Gods go begging

Amazon.com Review

One could argue that the war novel is an essentially timeless genre. Weapons are subject to long and increasingly lethal refinement–but from Gods Go Begging, is a remarkable work.

Vea begins his story in present-day San Francisco. The protagonist, Jesse Pasadoble, is a former Army sergeant who’s now made a name for himself as a criminal defense attorney. Haunted by wartime memories, Pasadoble has found a way to channel his anguish: his impoverished clients remind him of his suffering comrades, and he seeks a compensatory justice for what he and his platoon lost.

Jesse hated death. He did not fear it, but he hated it with all of his heart and soul. A year and a half of incredible fear in the highlands of Vietnam had been transformed into an almost anguished love the living, intact moment, the moment that can never be possessed. Like many of the men who have witnessed the best and worst in themselves, who have been given a glimpse of the end of their lives at a very young age, he had lost the power to be lonely. The power had been replaced by something else: a soul sickness; a hunger for beauty, but only at a distance. Though he could not love his own life and the things within it, Jesse hated death.

His newest client is a 12-year-old boy, a child of the projects who’s been charged with the brutal murder of two women. As the case unfolds, the barriers between past and present, America and Vietnam, erode and finally disappear. Meanwhile, Vea expertly marries the magical realism of Gabriel García Márquez to his visceral accounts of battle. Indeed, whether we measure by the breadth of his imagination, the strength of his characters, or the hallucinatory power of his prose, there seems to be no novelistic terrain that Vea can’t conquer. A chronicle of defeat and suffering, Gods Go Begging represents a paradoxical victory for the author–and, of course, for the reader. –Ted Leventhal

From Publishers Weekly

Mexican-American author and Vietnam vet V?a’s third novel (after La Maravilla) is a gritty, dark, and tightly wrapped tale of mystery, desire, hopelessness and death. A shocking double homicide; the nagging torment of Vietnam War flashbacks; a string of oddball, lowlife and scumbag clients; and his own tequila-clouded life make practicing law a daily ordeal for San Francisco defense attorney Jesse Pasadoble. And now dead soldier comrades and a crazy army chaplain from Jesse’s Vietnam past have come back to both haunt and guide him as he struggles with his own demons and despair. Jesse is a cynical lawyer who believes “an honest victim is as rare as an honest defendant.” When the two female owners of the Amazon Luncheonette are gunned down on the street, Jesse is tapped to defend the primary suspect, a scared and nearly illiterate local gangbanger called Bisquit Boy. The search leads him first to the culture of San Francisco’s housing projects, then to the Vietnamese mob and, in an intensity of painful memories, through his own past. V?a’s third-person narration alternates between the present-day plot and Jesse’s war experience; chapters flash back to the Asian jungle and the men Jesse fought alongside, among them the mysterious chaplain who holds the key to current events. Jesse’s anguish actually heightens his awareness and allows him to finally unravel a Gordian knot of bizarre relationships, which not only brings justice for the victims, but a measure of peace to his own soul as well. V?a composes his plot with great skill, leaving the reader strongly convinced of his story’s credibility. (Aug.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

God’s Gift

SUMMARY: Missionary work in Africa was the most difficult and faith-affirming labor James Graham had ever faced, and warm, homey presents from a Good Samaritan back home gave him hope to carry on. But an injury halted his work and sent him home to Chicago. There, James met Rachel Ashcroft, who’d sent those thoughtful gifts, and he was intrigued by the sadness that shadowed her features. Bringing the light back into Rachel’s face gave him new purpose, but was this respite only temporary? Or could James release his past and open his heart to receive Rachel’s gift of love?

The God Project

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Something is happening to the children of Eastbury, Massachusetts…. Something that causes healthy babies to turn cold in their cribs. Something that strikes at the heart of every parent’s darkest fears. Something unexplained that is taking the children, one by one.
Sally Montgomery has just lost her beautiful little baby girl. Lucy and Jim Corliss, bitterly divorced, have been reunited by the sudden disappearance of their son. An entire town waits on the edge of panic for the next child to be taken. They all know there must be a reason for the terror. But no one ever expected…*The God Project*.
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The God Machine

Hellboy: The God Machine by Thomas E. Sniegoski
* * *
Hellboy, a bloodred, cloven-hoofed demon raised by the United States government, is a top field agent for the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense. He questions the unknown — then beats it into submission.
Religious artifacts from every faith are disappearing without a trace. The identity of the perpetrator is a complete mystery until Hellboy and Liz Sherman — acting on an unlikely tip from a ghost — foil a museum heist attempted by crude, robotic constructs inhabited by human spirits.
One of these freed human spirits offers to help Hellboy track down those who imprisoned him: a fanatical order of psychics obsessed with creating a new messiah, one that will bring about a new stage of evolution for mankind — whether mankind is willing or not. Now only Hellboy and his colleagues stand between a vulnerable humanity and an evil, vengeful *god*….

God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

Christopher Hitchens, described in the *London Observer* as “one of the most prolific, as well as brilliant, journalists of our time” takes on his biggest subject yet–the increasingly dangerous role of religion in the world.
In the tradition of Bertrand Russell’s **Why I Am Not a Christian*** *and Sam Harris’s recent bestseller, **The End Of Faith**, Christopher Hitchens makes the ultimate case against religion. With a close and erudite reading of the major religious texts, he documents the ways in which religion is a man-made wish, a cause of dangerous sexual repression, and a distortion of our origins in the cosmos. With eloquent clarity, Hitchens frames the argument for a more secular life based on science and reason, in which hell is replaced by the Hubble Telescope’s awesome view of the universe, and Moses and the burning bush give way to the beauty and symmetry of the double helix.
*From the Hardcover edition.*
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God Don’t Like Ugly

EDITORIAL REVIEW: In this richly drawn novel set on the streets, porches and in the parlors of 1960s Ohio, Mary Monroe brings to life the bond between two girls from opposite sides of the tracks–and the shattering event that changes their lives forever. At the heart of the story is Annette Goode, a shy, awkward girl who keeps a terrible secret. Mr. Boatwright, the boarder her hardworking mother has taken in, abuses her daily. Frightened and ashamed, Annette withdraws into a world of books and food. But the summer Annette turns thirteen, something incredible happens: Rhoda Nelson chooses her as a friend. Rhoda, who is everything Annette is not–gorgeous, slim, and worldly–welcomes Annette into the heart of her eccentric family, which includes her handsome and dignified father; her lovely, fragile, “Muh’Dear;” her brooding, dangerous brother Jock; and her colorful white relatives–half-crazy Uncle Johnny; sultry Aunt Lola; and scary, surly Granny Goose. With Rhoda’s help, Annette survives adolescence and blossoms into a woman. But after her beautiful best friend makes a stunning confession about a horrific childhood crime, Annette’s world will never be the same. “A moving tale of the intricacies of friendship, the awful devastation of silence, and the renewing spirit of survival.”–*Ebony * “Watch out Toni Morrison, there is a new sister in town.”–*Rapport*

Go Home, Stranger

Go Home, Stranger by Charles Williams
**An engineer battles a small town to see his sister released from prison. **
It takes Reno three days to get from Peru to the Gulf Coast, and when he gets to Waynesport he has only one stop to make: the city jail, where his sister is being held on a murder rap. The way Vickie tells it, she saw her husband having a drink with another woman, they quarreled, and she went to the bathroom. When she came out, he was shot through the back of the skull. The police believe every word of her story — except the part about who pulled the trigger.
Her husband was in Waynesport looking for a crook named Rupert Conway, whom the local police do not seem towant found. To save his sister’s neck, Reno must wade through corruption as fetid as the swamps that surround this hellish southern town, where the alligators aren’t the only ones who are eager to kill.

Glamorama

EDITORIAL REVIEW: “Arguably the novel of the 1990s…**Glamorama** should establish Ellis as the most fearless and ambitious writer of his generation…A must read.” –*The Seattle Times*The author of **American Psycho** and **Less Than Zero** continues to shock and haunt us with his incisive and brilliant dissection of the modern world. In his most ambitious and gripping book yet, Bret Easton Ellis takes our celebrity obsessed culture and increases the volume exponentially.Victor Ward, a model with perfect abs who exists in magazines and gossip columns and whose life resembles an ultra-hip movie, is living with one beautiful model and having an affair with another. And then it’s time to move on to the next stage. But the future he gets is not the one he had in mind.

Give Me Liberty

(Precious Gem #86)
AT LONG LAST…LOVE!
For Liberty Jones, life is an open road, and in her Triumph Spitfire she cruises through it moment by thrilling moment. Until the car breaks down in Sterling–the Vermont town where she spent her childhood summers. Not only does the farm house bequeathed by her aunt inspire a flood of memories, but there’s a man who catches her eye, and he’s hot enough to overheat any woman’s engine…
Luke Fulton has a dream-buy back the family land he lost to ski-resort developers and find the right woman to share it with. Liberty seems willing to make it come true, but when he learns of her plans to sell off her inheritance, Luke fears another summer romance is reaching the season’s end. Now Luke has a new dream: to convince Liberty that life’s unexpected detours can not only turn the heart around, but lead to happiness and long-lasting love…

Girls in Trucks

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Sarah Walters is a less-than-perfect debutante. She tries hard to follow the time-honored customs of the Charleston Camellia Society, as her mother and grandmother did, standing up straight in cotillion class and attending lectures about all the things that Camellias *don’t *do. (Like ride with boys in pickup trucks.) But Sarah can’t quite ignore the barbarism just beneath all that propriety, and as soon as she can she decamps South Carolina for a life in New York City. There, she and her fellow displaced Southern friends try to make sense of city sophistication, to understand how much of their training applies to real life, and how much to the strange and rarefied world they’ve left behind. When life’s complications become overwhelming, Sarah returns home to confront with matured eyes the motto “Once a Camellia, always a Camellia”- and to see how much fuller life can be, for good and for ill, among those who know you best. *Girls in Trucks* introduces an irresistable, sweet, and wise voice that heralds the arrival of an exciting new talent.

The Girls from Ames: A Story of Women and a Forty-Year Friendship

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **From the coauthor of the million-copy bestseller *The Last Lecture* comes a moving tribute to female friendships, with the inspiring story of eleven girls and the ten women they became.** Meet the Ames Girls: eleven childhood friends who formed a special bond growing up in Ames, Iowa. As young women, they moved to eight different states, yet managed to maintain an enduring friendship that would carry them through college and careers, marriage and motherhood, dating and divorce, a child’s illness and the mysterious death of one member of their group. Capturing their remarkable story, *The Girls from Ames* is a testament to the deep bonds of women as they experience life’s joys and challenges — and the power of friendship to triumph over heartbreak and unexpected tragedy. The girls, now in their forties, have a lifetime of memories in common, some evocative of their generation and some that will resonate with any woman who has ever had a friend. Photograph by photograph, recollection by recollection, occasionally with tears and often with great laughter, their sweeping and moving story is shared by Jeffrey Zaslow, *Wall Street Journal* columnist, as he attempts to define the matchless bonds of female friendship. It demonstrates how close female relationships can shape every aspect of women’s lives – their sense of themselves, their choice of men, their need for validation, their relationships with their mothers, their dreams for their daughters – and reveals how such friendships thrive, rewarding those who have committed to them. *The Girls from Ames* is the story of a group of ordinary women who built an extraordinary friendship. With both universal insights and deeply personal moments, it is a book that every woman will relate to and be inspired by.

The Girl Who Chased the Moon

Emily Benedict has come to Mullaby, North Carolina, hoping to solve at least some of the riddles surrounding her mother’s life. But the moment Emily enters the house where her mother grew up and meets the grandfather she never knew, she realizes that mysteries aren’t solved in Mullaby, they’re a way of life: Here are rooms where the wallpaper changes to suit your mood. Unexplained lights skip across the yard at midnight. And a neighbor, Julia Winterson, bakes hope in the form of cakes, not only wishing to satisfy the town’s sweet tooth but also dreaming of rekindling the love she fears might be lost forever. Can a hummingbird cake really bring back a lost love? Is there really a ghost dancing in Emily’s backyard? The answers are never what you expect. But in this town of lovable misfits, the unexpected fits right in.
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Girl in Translation

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **Introducing a fresh, exciting Chinese-American voice, an inspiring debut about an immigrant girl forced to choose between two worlds and two futures. ** When Kimberly Chang and her mother emigrate from Hong Kong to Brooklyn squalor, she quickly begins a secret double life: exceptional schoolgirl during the day, Chinatown sweatshop worker in the evenings. Disguising the more difficult truths of her life-like the staggering degree of her poverty, the weight of her family’s future resting on her shoulders, or her secret love for a factory boy who shares none of her talent or ambition-Kimberly learns to constantly translate not just her language but herself back and forth between the worlds she straddles. Through Kimberly’s story, author Jean Kwok, who also emigrated from Hong Kong as a young girl, brings to the page the lives of countless immigrants who are caught between the pressure to succeed in America, their duty to their family, and their own personal desires, exposing a world that we rarely hear about. Written in an indelible voice that dramatizes the tensions of an immigrant girl growing up between two cultures, surrounded by a language and world only half understood, *Girl in Translation* is an unforgettable and classic novel of an American immigrant-a moving tale of hardship and triumph, heartbreak and love, and all that gets lost in translation.