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The Bourne Objective

SUMMARY: Facing down mercenaries in Africa, Jason Bourne witnesses the death of an art dealer named Tracy Atherton. Her killing dredges up snatches of Bourne’s impaired memory, in particular the murder of a young woman on Bali who entrusted him with a strangely engraved ring – an artifact of such powerful significance that people have killed to obtain it. Now he’s determined to find the ring’s owner and purpose. But Bourne never knows what terrible acts he’ll discover he committed when he digs into the past.

The Book of Three

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **The Newbery-winning fantasy series now available in gorgeous new paperback editions!** Since *The Book of Three* was first published in 1964, young readers have been enthralled by the adventures of Taran the Assistant Pig-Keeper and his quest to become a hero. Taran is joined by an engaging cast of characters that includes Eilonwy, the strong-willed and sharp-tongued princess; Fflewddur Fflam, the hyperbole-prone bard; the ever-faithful Gurgi; and the curmudgeonly Doli—all of whom have become involved in an epic struggle between good and evil that shapes the fate of the legendary land of Prydain. Released over a period of five years, Lloyd Alexander’s beautifully written tales not only captured children’s imaginations but also garnered the highest critical praise. *The Black Cauldron* was a Newbery Honor Book, and the final volume in the chronicles, *The High King*, crowned the series by winning the Newbery Medal for “the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” Henry Holt is proud to present this classic series in a new, redesigned paperback format. The jackets feature stunning art by acclaimed fantasy artist David Wyatt, giving the books a fresh look for today’s generation of young fantasy lovers. The companion book of short stories, *The Foundling* is also available in paperback at this time. In their more than thirty years in print, the Chronicles of Prydain have become the standard of excellence in fantasy literature for children.

The book of other people

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. “The instruction was simple: make somebody up,” explains novelist Smith in her introduction to this marvelous compendium of 23 distinct, pungent stories that attack the question of “character” from all angles. From David Mitchell’s hilarious rendering of one menopausal woman’s fantasy internet love-affair to ZZ Packer’s heart-wrenching Jewish guy-black girl romance, each story is, as Smith puts it, “its own thing entirely.” There are moments of prosaic precision (Andrew O’Hagan’s eerily incisive “Gordon” is introduced “in the talcum-powdered air of the bathroom muttering calculations and strange moral sums about the cause of Hamlet’s unhappiness”), but this volume is more than a showcase for deft prose and quirky souls. Toby Litt’s lovely, lyrical “Monster,” for example, playfully upends notions of personhood, as does Dave Eggers’ surprising “Theo,” a moving tale of a mountain who falls in love. Also on hand are a number of wonderful graphic shorts: Daniel Clowe shrewdly explores an insufferable critic’s solipsistic lapses, Nick Hornby’s “A Writing Life” gives a knowing wink with a series of writer bios and mock headshots, and “Jordan Wellington Lint” by Chris Ware cleverly chronicles the first 13 years of its hero’s life. With so much to savor-the sensuality of Adam Thirlwell’s “Nigora,” the knowingness of George Saunder’s “Puppy”-this anthology will sate even the most famished short story fan. Sales benefit Eggers’s nonprofit literary organization 826 NYC.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“…But just when you’re ready to howl in frustration at the anthologification of the book world-_I’ve seen the best minds of my generation, live blogging about recipes that inspire them_-along comes The Book of Other People…Other People collects 23 pieces by a who’s who of 21st-century geniuses and wunderkinds, from Dave Eggers to Edwidge Dandicat…Smith sent her contributors just one instruction: Make somebody up.”
-_USA Today_

“Truly hip.”
-_The Boston Globe_

“Whether they are old-fashioned narratives, playful improvisations or comic- strip-like tales told in pictures, these stories force us to re-evaluate that old chestnut “Character is destiny.” They remind us that an individual’s life is itself a narrative with a beginning, a middle and at least the intimations of an end. And they showcase the many time-honored techniques that writers use to limn their characters’ predicaments, from straight-up ventriloquism to the use of unreliable narrators to a “Rashomon”-like splitting of perspectives.”
-Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“From its strange, graphic-novelesque cover-an array of cartoonish sketches of odd-looking faces in profile, stacked like ladder rungs-to its uncommonly eye- catching lineup of contributors, “The Book of Other People,” a 2008 paperback from Penguin Books, is extraordinary.”
-_Charlotte Observer_

“If you only read one book, make it this dazzling selection of short stories…”
-Eve Magazine UK

“…Some of the wittiest and wisest stories you’ll read all year…”
-Elle UK

“Character provides the thematic key to these stories, all new to this collection, from some of our finest younger contemporary fiction writers.

Editor and contributor Smith (On Beauty, 2005, etc.) invited 22 other authors, many of them (like her) better known for novels than short fiction, to write a story inspired by the creation of a character. “The instruction was simple,” she writes in her introduction, “make somebody up.” Yet the stories correspond to no consensus about the role of character in fiction, or a return to realism, or the responsibility of fiction to mirror society. To the contrary, what Smith believes the stories show is that “there are as many ways to create ‘character’ (or deny the possibility of ‘character’) as there are writers.” The title of each story comes from the name of a character or type (“The Monster”) with the selections sequenced alphabetically. Many of the writers, including Smith, come from the McSweeney’s and/or Believer literary circle (Dave Eggers, Vendela Vida, Heidi Julavits, Chris Ware, Nick Hornby et al.) and most of the contributions range from the short to the very short (Toby Litt’s “The Monster” is a four-page paragraph). With proceeds benefiting 826 New York (a nonprofit organization for the inspiration and development of student writing), none of the writers were paid for their work, with the results sometimes more playful (and occasionally slighter) than one has come to expect from them. Jonathan Lethem’s Dickensian titled “Perkus Tooth” offers a hilarious dismissal of rock critics. A.L. Kennedy’s “Frank” provides an existential parable about a man who isn’t who he thinks he is. Though many of the stories have a first-person perspective, the narrator is rarely the title character, and some of the challenge for the reader can be determining whom a story is really about. In Colm T~ib”n’s “Donal Webster,” the name of the title character is never even mentioned, leaving the reader to guess who is addressing whom.

While the quality inevitably varies, the spirit of the anthology is that reading should be fun rather than work. -_Kirkus Reviews_

The Book of Fires

SUMMARY: A stunning historical novel, ‘The Book of Fires’ is the unforgettable story of Agnes Trussel ‘ and love, fireworks and redemption.Brought up in rural Sussex, seventeen-year-old Agnes Trussel is carrying an unwanted child. Taking advantage of the death of her elderly neighbour, Agnes steals her savings and runs away to London. On her way she encounters the intriguing Lettice Talbot who promises that she will help Agnes upon their arrival. But Agnes soon becomes lost in the dark, labyrinthine city. She ends up at the household of John Blacklock, laconic firework-maker, becoming his first female assistant.The months pass and it becomes increasingly difficult for Agnes to conceal her secret. Soon she meets Cornelius Soul, seller of gunpowder, and hatches a plan which could save her from ruin. Yet why does John Blacklock so vehemently disapprove of Mr Soul? And what exactly is he keeping from her? Could the housekeeper, Mrs Blight, with her thirst for accounts of hangings, suspect her crime or condition?Historical fiction at its very best, ‘The Book of Fires’ is utterly intriguing, completely compelling and impossible to put down.

The Bone Fire: A Mystery

EDITORIAL REVIEW: “Christine Barber is new to the Southwest in the sense that *The Replacement Child* is her first novel. But she has a great feel for the territory and for the family connections that enforce its strong community bonds.” —*THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW*   Every year, the people of Santa Fe gather together for the burning of a four-story-tall figure called Zozobra, a local custom that that takes place during the Fiesta de Santa Fe. Early the next morning, as the sounds of the Fiesta celebration still echo through the streets, skull is discovered in the ashes of Zozobra.   As Detective Sergeant Gilbert Montoya starts to investigate the case, disturbing displays of human bones begin appearing at religious sites around the city. With a possible psychopath on the loose, Gil goes to newspaper editor Lucy Newroe for help to find the person responsible in a case that will take them into the highest and lowest levels of Santa Fe society.   Christine Barber was highly praised for her first book, *The Replacement Child*, which won the first annual Tony Hillerman Prize and was named a *New York Times* Notable Book. An intriguing, impressive new mystery, *The Bone Fire* captures the colorful New Mexican landscape and the unique world of Santa Fe.

The Bone Chamber

SUMMARY: Mysteriously summoned to Quantico to help re-create the face of a murdered, mutilated young woman, FBI forensic artist Special Agent Sydney Fitzpatrick knows immediately this is no ordinary crime. The hit-and-run death of the forensic anthropologist assisting her—a close friend—and Sydney’s abrupt dismissal from the case by covert government investigators only strengthen her need for answers. Now her hunt for a killer is carrying her from Washington to Rome to the hidden chamber of a legendary tomb—on the trail of a fabled treasure of the Knights Templar . . . and a curse. For buried deep in the mysteries of the Freemasons and the Vatican’s Holy See is a secret that could rock the world. Suddenly an ancient map is pointing Sydney toward something the Templars wished to hide away forever—something that could unleash an unstoppable tide of blood and devastation.

The Body Of Jonah Boyd

SUMMARY: Denny is a secretary who has just begun an affair with her boss, while also maintaining a friendship with his wife. Invited to the family’s house for Thanksgiving dinner, she enters into a chain of events that will change everyone’s lives in ways that none can imagine. Hilarious, scorching, and full of surprises, The Body of Jonah Boyd is a tribute to the power of home, the lure of success, and, above all, the sisterhood of secretaries.

The Blood That Bonds

Two is trapped: hooked on heroin and forced to sell her body to feed the addiction. Her vampire lover Theroen can lift her from this dark life, but his plans conflict with those of the dangerous elder Abraham, to whom he is bonded by both blood and a long-held promise. Two enters a world of darkness, violence, and despair. She must fight for freedom, both for herself and for those she loves.

The Blood Spilt

SUMMARY: It’s midsummer in Sweden—when the light lingers through dawn and a long, isolating winter finally comes to an end. In this magical time, a brutal killer has chosen to strike. A female priest—who made enemies and acolytes in equal number—has been found hanging in her church. And a big-city lawyer quite acquainted with death enters the scene as police and parishioners try to pick up the pieces….Not long ago, attorney Rebecka Martinsson had to kill three men in order to stop an eerily similar murder spree—one that also involved a priest. Now she is back in Kiruna, the region of her birth, while a determined policewoman gnaws on the case and people who loved or loathed the victim mourn or revel in her demise. The further Rebecka is drawn into the mystery—a mystery that will soon take another victim—the more the dead woman’s world clutches her: a world of hurt and healing, sin and sexuality, and, above all, of sacrifice.In prose that is both lyrical and visceral, Åsa Larsson has crafted a novel of pure entertainment, a taut, atmospheric mystery that will hold you in thrall until the last, unforgettable page is turnedFrom the Hardcover edition.

The Blessings of the Animals: A Novel

SUMMARY: From Katrina Kittle, critically acclaimed author of The Kindness of Strangers, comes a wry and moving story of forgiveness, flexibility, happiness, and the art of moving on. Veterinarian Cami Anderson has hit a rough patch. Stymied by her recent divorce, she wonders if there are secret ingredients to a happy, long-lasting marriage or if the entire institution is outdated and obsolete. Couples all around her are approaching important milestones. Her parents are preparing to celebrate their fiftieth anniversary. Her brother and his partner find their marriage dreams legally blocked. Her former sister-in-law—still her best friend—is newly engaged. The youthfully exuberant romance of her teenage daughter is developing complications. And three separate men—including her ex-husband—are becoming entangled in Cami’s messy post-marital love life. But as she struggles to come to terms with her own doubts amid this chaotic circus of relationships, Cami finds strange comfort in an unexpected confidant: an angry, unpredictable horse in her care. With the help of her equine soul mate, she begins to make sense of marriage’s great mysteries—and its disconnects.

The Blackstone Chronicles

From Library Journal

Oliver Metcalf is the editor of the Blackstone Chronicle in Blackstone, NH. His father had been the director of the Blackstone Asylum before his death. Oliver had grown up in a cottage on the asylum’s grounds. A sense of evil and darkness pervades the now empty asylum. The Chronicle reports that the asylum is to be torn down and replaced with an upscale mall. About the time the wrecking ball makes its first swing, the funding for the project falls through. Residents of the town begin to receive mysterious gifts that seem to have the power to visit evil on the recipients. An accidental fall, a suicide, a kidnapping, and an explosion leave the town reeling. Metcalf knows he must remember something key to understanding the mystery and halting the terrible chain of accidents. This abridgment causes the “accidents” to appear with very little plot or character development. This, in turn, causes the terror to become somewhat tedious. The story is read with feeling and skill by Lee Meriwether. Recommended for large library collections.AJoanna M. Burkhardt, Univ. of Rhode Island Coll. of Continuing Education Lib., Providence
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Description

Now, for the first time, the New York Times bestselling serial thriller is complete in one terrifying volume. John Saul, the master of supernatural suspense, John Saul, brings to chilling life the small New England town of Blackstone–and the secrets and sins that lay buried there. . . .

From atop Blackstone’s highest hill, the old Asylum casts its shadow over the village. Built in the 1890s to house the insane, the Asylum has stood vacant for decades. But now, the wrecker’s ball is about to strike–and unleash an ominous evil. Strange gifts begin to appear on the doorsteps of Blackstone’s finest citizens.

Each bears a mysterious history.

Each brings a horrifying power to harm.

Each reveals another thread in the suspensefully woven web of . . .

THE BLACKSTONE CHRONICLES

Part I–An Eye for an Eye: The Doll
Part II–Twist of Fate: The Locket
Part III–Ashes to Ashes: The Dragon’s Flame
Part IV–In the Shadow of Evil: The Handkerchief
Part V–Day of Reckoning: The Stereoscope
Part VI–Asylum

The Black Prism

SUMMARY: Gavin Guile is the Prism, the most powerful man in the world. He is high priest and emperor, a man whose power, wit, and charm are all that preserves a tenuous peace. But Prisms never last, and Guile knows exactly how long he has left to live: Five years to achieve five impossible goals. But when Guile discovers he has a son, born in a far kingdom after the war that put him in power, he must decide how much he’s willing to pay to protect a secret that could tear his world apart.

The Black Minutes

SUMMARY: When a young journalist named Bernardo Blanco is killed in the fictional Mexican port city of Paracuán, investigation into his murder reveals missing links in a disturbing multiple homicide case from twenty years earlier. As police officer Ramón “el Macetón” Cabrera discovers, Blanco had been writing a book about a 1970s case dealing with the murder of several young schoolgirls in Paracuán by a man known as el Chacal. Cabrera realizes that whoever killed Blanco wanted to keep the truth about el Chacal from being revealed, and he becomes determined to discover that truth. The Black Minutes chronicles both Cabrera’s investigation into Blanco’s murder and goes back in time to follow detective Vicente Rangel’s investigation of the original el Chacal case. Both narratives expose worlds of corruption, from cops who are content to close the door on a case without true justice to powerful politicians who can pay their way out of their families’ crimes. Full of dark twists and turns, and populated by a cast of captivating—and mostly corrupt—characters, The Black Minutes is an electrifying novel from a brilliant new voice.

The Black Ice

From Publishers Weekly

LAPD detective Hieronymous “Harry” Bosch, protagonist of the highly praised mystery The Black Echo , returns in a procedural thriller set in and around the drug-trafficking underworlds of inner-city Los Angeles and the wastelands of Mexico. When Bosch arrives at a sleazy hotel room where a fellow officer has committed suicide, he senses that something is awry. Noncommittal superior officers, a diffident widow and tales linking the dead man to a newly created street drug called “black ice” (heroin, crack and PCP rolled into one) send Bosch down a winding trail of forensic impossibilities, brutally violent drug traffickers and an ultimately shocking case of mistaken identity. Award-winning Connelly’s second fictional effort is strong and sure. His pacing could be better–too often he conveys the same information twice–but his plot and characters more than make up for a slow start. This novel establishes him as a writer with a superior talent for storytelling.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

Second tense, tightly wound tangle of a case for Hieronymous Bosch (The Black Echo, 1991). This time out, the LAPD homicide cop, who’s been exiled to Hollywood Division for his bumptious behavior, sniffs out the bloody trail of the designer drug black ice.” Connelly (who covers crime for the Los Angeles Times) again flexes his knowledge of cop ways–and of cop-novel clich‚s. Cast from the hoary mold of the maverick cop, Bosch pushes his way onto the story’s core case–the apparent suicide of a narc–despite warnings by top brass to lay off. Meanwhile, Bosch’s boss, a prototypical pencil-pushing bureaucrat hoping to close out a majority of Hollywood’s murder cases by New Year’s Day, a week hence, assigns the detective a pile of open cases belonging to a useless drunk, Lou Porter. One of the cases, the slaying of an unidentified Hispanic, seems to tie in to the death of the narc, which Bosch begins to read as murder stemming from the narc’s dirty involvement in black ice. When Porter is murdered shortly after Bosch speaks to him, and then the detective’s love affair with an ambitious pathologist crashes, Bosch decides to head for Mexico, where clues to all three murders point. There, the well-oiled, ten- gear narrative really picks up speed as Bosch duels with corrupt cops; attends the bullfights; breaks into a fly-breeding lab that’s the distribution center for Mexico’s black-ice kingpin; and takes part in a raid on the kingpin’s ranch that concludes with Bosch waving his jacket like a matador’s cape at a killer bull on the rampage. But the kingpin escapes, leading to a not wholly unexpected twist–and to a touching assignation with the dead narc’s widow. Expertly told, and involving enough–but lacking the sheer artistry and heart-clutching thrills of, say, David Lindsay’s comparable Stuart Haydon series (Body of Evidence, etc.). — Copyright ©1993, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

The black echo

From Publishers Weekly

Connelly, a crime reporter for the Los Angeles Times , transcends the standard L.A. police procedural with this original and eminently authentic first novel. Hieronymus (Harry) Bosch–former hero cop bumped from the L.A. homicide desk to the lowly Beverly Hills squad–gets the call on a drug death at Mulholland Dam. Harry recognizes the corpse as that of a fellow soldier in Vietnam; both were “tunnel rats” who searched for Viet Cong in the network of burrows beneath Vietnamese villages. Investigation connects his old pal to an unsolved bank job–the vault was tunneled into from the storm drains below–and Harry takes his information to the FBI. The Bureau alerts the LAPD, which reactivates internal affairs surveillance (the previous IAD episode is explained throughout the narrative), only to have the FBI backtrack and request Harry as liaison on the case. Paired with beautiful FBI agent Eleanor Wish, Harry makes sense of the Vietnam connection to the bank job–a discovery that puts them both in danger from deadly ex-Marines and a powerful insider from either the LAPD or the FBI itself. Police higher-ups are somewhat cliched, but Connelly avoids L.A. stereotypes and delivers this front-page story with military precision.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

YA– Harry Bosch likes order, contends that there are no coincidences, and keeps meticulous records in his murder book.'' When the body of a formertunnel rat” from Vietnam is found in a drainpipe, Harry is the detective on duty and is called to the scene. His identification of the body begins an investigation that leads to more murder, bank robbery, heroin, diamonds, and betrayal. Connelly’s descriptions of autopsies, murder scenes, and police procedure are vivid and realistic. The use of acronyms and police jargon puts readers in the middle of the action. A real page turner with gutty realism and an unusual twist.
– Debbie Hyman, R. E. Lee High School, Springfield, VA
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.