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Playing with Fire (Skulduggery Pleasant, Book 2)

(Skulduggery Pleasant #2) SUMMARY: Skulduggery and Valkyrie are facing a new enemy: Baron Vengeous, who is determined to bring back the terrifying Faceless Ones and is crafting an army of evil to help him. Added to that, Vengeous is about to enlist a new ally (if he can raise it from the dead): the horrible Grotesquery, a very unlikable monster of legend. Once Vengeous is on the loose, dead bodies and vampires start showing up all over Ireland. Now pretty much everybody is out to kill Valkyrie, and the daring detective duo faces its biggest challenge yet. But what if the greatest threat to Valkyrie is just a little closer to home? Look for Scepter of the Ancients

The Player

The Player by Rhonda Nelson
There’s nothing like a man in uniform…or out of it! Especially when he’s as hot as former Ranger Jamie Flanagan. After their last assignment went horribly wrong, he and his buddies needed to get out of the military for good. There was only one catch — that he and his pals promise their commanding officer one favor. *Any* favor.
Now tall, dark and sexy Jamie is a top security specialist…and the ultimate ladies’ man. So he’s more than a little surprised when he learns the colonel has set him up to protect his granddaughter. Who would trust a player like Jamie with a gorgeous woman like Audrey?
Then he learns his “mission” is to seduce her away from another man….

Player piano

SUMMARY: Vonnegut’s first novel spins the chilling tale of engineer Paul Proteus, who must find a way to live in a world dominated by a super computer and run completely by machines. Paul’s rebellion is vintage Vonnegut–wildly funny, deadly serious, and terrifyingly close to reality.

A Place of My Own: The Architecture of Daydreams

SUMMARY: “A room of one’s own: is there anybody who hasn’t at one time or another wished for such a place, hasn’t turned those soft words over until they’d assumed a habitable shape?” When writer Michael Pollan decided to plant a garden, the result was an award-winning treatise on the borders between nature and contemporary life, the acclaimed bestseller Second Nature. Now Pollan turns his sharp insight to the craft of building, as he recounts the process of designing and constructing a small one-room structure on his rural Connecticut property–a place in which he hoped to read, write and daydream, built with his two own unhandy hands. Invoking the titans of architecture, literature and philosophy, from Vitrivius to Thoreau, from the Chinese masters of feng shui to the revolutionary Frank Lloyd Wright, Pollan brilliantly chronicles a realm of blueprints, joints and trusses as he peers into the ephemeral nature of “houseness” itself. From the spark of an idea to the search for a perfect site to the raising of a ridgepole, Pollan revels in the infinitely detailed, complex process of creating a finished structure. At once superbly written, informative and enormously entertaining, A Place of My Own is for anyone who has ever wondered how the walls around us take shape–and how we might shape them ourselves. A Place of My Own recounts his two-and-a-half-year journey of discovery in an absorbing narrative that deftly weaves the day-to-day work of design and building–from siting to blueprint, from the pouring of foundations to finish carpentry–with reflections on everything form the power of place to shape our lives to the question of what constitutes “real work” in a technologicalsociety. A book about craft that is itself beautifully crafted, linking the world of the body and material things with the realm of mind, heart, and spirit, “A Place of My Own has received extraordinary praise: –> “From the Trade Paperback edition.

Phoenix Noir

EDITORIAL REVIEW: “**Patrick Millikin**…as if to prove his witty claim that ‘sunshine is the new noir,’ offers one superb specimen, ‘Whiteout on Van Buren,’ in which [author] Don Winslow makes skillful use of a city street at high noon to provide the perfect metaphor for life and death.”—*New York Times Book Review* Brand-new stories by: Diana Gabaldon, Lee Child, James Sallis, Luis Alberto Urrea, Jon Talton, Megan Abbott, Charles Kelly, Robert Anglen, Patrick Millikin, Laura Tohe, Kurt Reichenbaugh, Gary Phillips, David Corbett, Don Winslow, Dogo Barry Graham, and Stella Pope Duarte.   **Patrick Millikin** is a bookseller at the Poisoned Pen Bookstore in Scottsdale. As a freelance writer, his articles, interviews, and reviews have appeared in *Publishers Weekly*, *Firsts Magazine*, *Paradoxa*, *Yourflesh Quarterly*, and other publications. Millikin currently lives in central Phoenix.

Philosophy: who needs it

SUMMARY: This collection of essays was the last work planned by Ayn Rand before her death in 1982. In it, she summarizes her view of philosophy and deals with a broad spectrum of topics. According to Ayn Rand, the choice we make is not whether to have a philosophy, but which one to have: rational, conscious, and therefore practical; or contradictory, unidentified, and ultimately lethal. Written with all the clarity and eloquence that have placed Ayn Rand’s Objectivist philosophy in the mainstream of American thought, these essays range over such basic issues as education, morality, censorship, and inflation to prove that philosophy is the fundamental force in all our lives.

Philebus

Plato, along with his teacher Socrates and student Aristotle, is one of the most famous and influential philosophers in history. Plato founded the Academy in Athens which greatly helped develop philosophy and he was also instrumental in the development of Western religion and spirituality. This edition of Philebus includes a table of contents.

The Phantom of Manhattan

The Phantom of Manhattan by Frederick Forsyth
The stunning continuation of the timeless classic *The Phantom of the Opera*.
In *The Phantom of Manhattan*, acclaimed, bestselling suspense novelist Frederick Forsyth pens a magnificent work of historical fiction, rife with the insights and sounds of turn-of-the-century New York City, while continuing the dramatic saga which began with Gaston Leroux’s brilliant novel *The Phantom of the Opera*…
More than two decades have passed since Antoinette Giry, the mistress of the corps de ballet at the Paris Opera, rescued a hideously disfigured boy named Erik from a carnival and brought him to live in the labyrinthine cellars of the opera house. Soon thereafter, his intense, unrequited love for a beautiful chorus girl set in motion a tragic string of events, forcing him to flee Paris forever. Now, as she lies dying in a convent, Madam Giry tells the untold story of the Phantom and his clandestine journey to New York City to start anew, where he would become a wealthy entrepreneur and build the glorious Manhattan Opera House…all so he could see his beloved, now a famous diva, once again. But the outcome of her visit would prove even more devastating than before— and yet, would allow the Phantom to know, for the first time in his brutal life, the true meaning of love…

Phaedrus

Plato 424/423 BC[a] – 348/347 BC), was a Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science-wikipedia

Phaedo

Plato’s Phaedo is deservedly one of the best known works of Greek literature, but also one of the most complex. Set in the prison where Socrates is awaiting execution, it portrays Plato’s model philosopher in action, spending his last hours in conversation with two other seasoned members of his circle about the fate of the human soul after death. Professor Rowe attempts to help the reader find a way through the intricate structure both of individual passages and arguments and of the dialogue as a whole, stressing its intelligibility as a unified work of art and giving equal attention to its literary and philosophical aspects. The notes also aim to provide the kind of help with Plato’s Greek which is needed by comparative beginners in the language, but the commentary is intended for any student, classical scholar, or philosopher with an interest in the close reading of Plato.
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Peter Pan

HarperCollins is proud to present its incredible range of best-loved, essential classics. ‘Second to the right …and then straight on till morning!’ Desperate to hear bedtime stories, Peter Pan waits outside the nursery window of Wendy, …

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Petals from the Sky

EDITORIAL REVIEW: When twenty-year-old Meng Ning declares that she wants to be a Buddhist nun, her mother is aghast. In her eyes, a nun’s life means only deprivation – ‘no freedom, no love, no meat’. But to Meng Ning, it means the chance to control her own destiny, and to live in an oasis of music, art, and poetry far from her parents’ unhappy union. With an enigmatic nun known as Yi Kong, ‘Depending on Emptiness’, as her mentor, Meng Ning spends the next ten years studying abroad, disdaining men, and preparing to enter the nunnery. Then, a fire breaks out at her Buddhist retreat, and Meng Ning is carried to safety by Michael Fuller, a young American doctor. The unprecedented physical contact stirs her curiosity. And as their tentative friendship grows intimate, Meng Ning realizes she must choose between the sensual and the spiritual life.

Pet Sematary

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A perennial classic from Stephen King – timeless and topical.

Soon to be a major motion picture from Paramount.

The house looked right, felt right to Dr Louis Creed.

Rambling, old, unsmart and comfortable. A place where the family could settle; the children grow and play and explore. The rolling hills and meadows of Maine seemed a world away from the fume-choked dangers of Chicago.

Only the occasional big truck out on the two-lane highway, grinding up through the gears, hammering down the long gradients, growled out an intrusive threat.

But behind the house and far away from the road: that was safe. Just a carefully cleared path up into the woods where generations of local children have processed with the solemn innocence of the young, taking with them their dear departed pets for burial.

A sad place maybe, but safe. Surely a safe place. Not a place to seep into your dreams, to wake you, sweating with fear and foreboding.

(source: Bol.com)

Perfect Reader

EDITORIAL REVIEW: In this enchanting debut novel, Maggie Pouncey brings to life the unforgettable Flora Dempsey, the headstrong and quick-witted only child of Lewis Dempsey, a beloved former college president and famous literary critic in the league of Harold Bloom. At the news of her father’s death, Flora quits her big-city magazine job and returns to Darwin, the quaint New England town where she grew up, to retreat into the house he has left her, filled as it is with reminders of him. Even weightier is her appointment as her father’s literary executor. It seems he was secretly writing poems at the end of his life—love poems to a girlfriend Flora didn’t know he had. Flora soon discovers that this woman has her own claims on Lewis’s poetry and his memory, and in the righteousness of her loss and bafflement at her father’s secrets—his life so richly separate from her own in ways she never guessed—Flora is highly suspicious of her. Meanwhile, Flora is besieged by well-wishers and literary bloggers alike as she tries to figure out how to navigate it all: the fate of the poems, the girlfriend who wants a place in her life, her memories of her parents’ divorce, and her own uncertain future. At once comic and profound, *Perfect Reader* is a heady, uplifting story of loneliness and of the spur to growth that grief can be. Brimming with energy and with the elbow-patchy wisdom of her still-vivid father, Flora’s story will set her free to be the “perfect reader” not just of her father’s life but of her own as well.

Perfect Personality Profiles

Penned by a leading expert in the field of psychometrics, this guidebook is vital for anyone who needs to know more about psychometric profiling. From advice on preparation to a thorough breakdown of the personality traits that questionnaires typically examine, it walks the reader through every aspect of the test-taking process. Information is also included on how employers typically use personality profiles, and how personality exams are best approached and completed. This is an ideal resource for those looking to stay a step ahead of their competitors and fellow job seekers.

(source: Bol.com)

Perchance to Dream: Theatre Illuminata #2

From School Library Journal

Grade 8 Up—Beatrice Shakespeare Smith, Mistress of Revels, takes her show on the road in this rousing sequel to Eyes Like Stars (Feiwel & Friends, 2009). Abandoning the enchanted Théâtre Illuminata to rescue her beloved pirate Nate from watery doom in the lair of Sedna the Sea Goddess, the 17-year-old embarks on the journey accompanied by four feisty fairies and seductive Ariel, air spirit from The Tempest and Nate’s rival for Bertie’s heart. By turns perilous and comedic, the tale rolls along at breakneck speed as the troupe encounters danger and delight, negotiating predicaments with magic and wit. The fairies’ constant clamor for pie adds hilarity as Bertie explores the extent of her magical powers, untangles her origins, and meets her father, the brooding bird-man Scrimshander. Mantchev’s highly imaginative prose bursts with lush imagery and literary riffs, and the party’s encounter with the Innamorati, a traveling circus inspired by Cirque du Soleil, enhances the book’s surrealism. Although the lack of backstory may leave readers new to Bertie in the dust of confusion, fans of the first book will cry “Encore!” as the ending sets up the third in the series.—_Joyce Adams Burner, National Archives at Kansas City, MO_
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From

This sequel to Eyes like Stars (2009) returns to the fantastical Théâtre Illuminata, where 17-year-old Bertie Shakespeare Smith continues her wild, swashbuckling, genre-twisting adventures through magical, theatrical worlds. As in the previous volume, romance (more steamy suggestion than actual bodice-ripping) drives the girl-power plot, but the humorous allusions to famous literature, the breakneck banter among the magical cast, and, most of all, Bertie’s astonishing ability to influence the course of actions with her written words will captivate readers. Fans of the first title will be equally enchanted and will hope for a third act from Bertie. Grades 9-12. –Gillian Engberg