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The 37th Hour

EDITORIAL REVIEW: In a suspense novel of astounding power and depth, Jodi Compton unleashes a haunting tale of secrets and betrayal…and of one woman’s search for her missing husband that spirals into a dark journey strewn with bitter truths and damged lives. Here debut novelist Compton introduces an extraordinary character: Detective Sarah Pribek, a woman of strength, complexity, and instinct, a woman caught in an unimaginable nightmare…**The 37th Hour**On a chilly Minnesota morning, Sarah comes home to the house she shares with her husband and fellow cop, Michael Shiloh. Shiloh was supposed to be in Virginia, starting his training with the FBI. A seasoned missing-persons investigator, Sarah is used to anxious calls from wives and parents. She’s used to the innocent explanations that resolve so many of her cases. But from the moment she learns that he never arrived at Quantico, she feels a terrible foreboding. Now, beneath the bed in which they make love, Sarah finds Shiloh’s neatly packed bag. And in that instant the cop in her knows: Her husband has disappeared.Suddenly Sarah finds herself at the beginning of the kind of investigation she has made so often. The kind that she and her ex-partner, Genevieve, solved routinely — until a brutal crime stole Genevieve’s daughter and ended her career. The kind that pries open family secrets and hidden lives. For Sarah this investigation will mean going back to the beginning, to Shiloh’s religion-steeped childhood in Utah, the rift that separated him from his family — and the one horrifying case that struck them both too close to home. As Sarah turns over more and more unknown ground in her husband’s past, she sees her lover and friend change into a stranger before her eyes. And as she moves further down a trail of shocking surprises and bitter revelations, Sarah is about to discover that her worst fear — that Shiloh is dead — may be less painful than what she will learn next…In a novel of runaway tension, Jodi Compton masterfully weaves together the quiet details of everyday life with the moments that can shatter them forever. At once a beguiling mystery and a powerful rumination on family, friendship, and loss, **The 37th Hour** is a thriller that will catch you off guard at every turn — instantly compelling and utterly impossible to put down.*From the Hardcover edition.*

The 1500-Calorie-a-Day Cookbook

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **Eat up. Slim down. It’s just that easy–with just 1,500 delicious calories a day!** From the author of *The 1,200-Calorie-a-Day Menu Cookbook*, comes all new recipes for when you are counting calories but don’t want to sacrifice flavor, taste, or variety. While most low-calorie meal plans leave you hungry for more, this cookbook serves up a satisfying selection of energy-boosting breakfasts, fast-fix lunches, and delectable dinners–plus two healthy snacks and one guilt-free dessert–every single day! It’s hard to believe it’s just 1,500 calories.

That Summer

SUMMARY: For fifteen-year-old Haven, life is changing too quickly. She’s nearly six feet tall, her father is getting remarried, and her sister&150the always perfect Ashley&150is planning a wedding of her own. Haven wishes things could just go back to the way they were. Then an old boyfriend of Ashley’s reenters the picture, and through him, Haven sees the past for what it really was, and comes to grips with the future.

Texas Storm

Texas was hard territory, a giant state with a Mafia operation to match. But Mack Bolan would handle it one number at a time. In order of appearance. A single man against well-armed killers. It was a hell of a way to live. . . or die. The word had come to the Executioner that mobsters were moving in on the tremendously lucrative oil fields. Klingmans Wells, among the most profitable in the midlands, was the first to go out of business. The daughter of the owner had disappeared, too, and Klingman himself was in seclusion in his Dallas apartment. No one knew why. Bolan would have to find out. And that was only the beginning.

Texas by the tail

SUMMARY: Mitch Corley has a girlfriend with expensive tastes and a ruthless wife who refuses to become an “ex” without major compensation. He needs big money and he needs it fast. Which makes Texas Mitch’s natural destination, since nowhere are rich men more inclined to stake huge sums on a roll of the dice. The only problem is that Texans are sore losers–and they have cruel and ingenious ways of getting back at anyone who cheats them. Texas by the Tailis a high-spirited, sexy, and ingeniously plotted novel of the grifting life, by a writer who is a virtual encyclopedia of the con, the scam, and the double cross.

Tetrarch

Santhenar is on its knees. War with the forces from beyond the Void shows no sign of ending. And there is worse to come. The Aachim have invaded with a fleet of formidable battle constructs and the price for their withdrawal is half the globe. The future of the world now rests in the hands of just three flawed individuals: Tiaan, whose knowledge holds the key to a power that can yet destroy all foes; Nish who has sworn to bring the renegade geomancer to justice; and Irisis, whose great talents are hidden even from herself. Now Tiaan is leading her people in a last desperate stand against the Lyrinx… but if they are to survive she must master her new powers or be destroyed…
**Recensie(s)**

Readers of Eddings, Goodkind and Jordan will lap this one up * STARLOG * A page-turner of the highest order … formidable * SFX on GEOMANCER * The complex cultures, detailed geography, and the palpable weight of history provide a solid background to an intense story that … becomes increasingly compelling. This stands out as a worldbuilding labour of love with some truly original touches * LOCUS *
(source: Bol.com)

Tess of the D’Urbervilles

Edited with Notes by Tim Dolin and an Introduction by Margaret R. Higonnet

A heartaching portrayal of a woman faced by an impossible choice in the pursuit of happiness, Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles is edited with notes by Tim Dolin and an introduction by Margaret R. Higonnet in Penguin Classics.
When Tess Durbeyfield is driven by family poverty to claim kinship with the wealthy D’Urbervilles and seek a portion of their family fortune, meeting her ‘cousin’ Alec proves to be her downfall. A very different man, Angel Clare, seems to offer her love and salvation, but Tess must choose whether to reveal her past or remain silent in the hope of a peaceful future. With its sensitive depiction of the wronged Tess and powerful criticism of social convention, Tess of the D’Urbervilles, subtitled ‘A Pure Woman’, is one of the most moving and poetic of Hardy’s novels.
Based on the three-volume first edition that shocked readers when first published in 1891, this edition includes as appendices: Hardy’s Prefaces, the Landscapes of Tess, episodes originally censored from the Graphic periodical version and a selection of the Graphic illustrations.
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), born Higher Brockhampton, near Dorchester, originally trained as an architect before earning his living as a writer. Though he saw himself primarily as a poet, Hardy was the author of some of the late eighteenth century’s major novels: The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891), Far from the Madding Crowd (1874), and Jude the Obscure (1895). Amidst the controversy caused by Jude the Obscure, he turned to the poetry he had been writing all his life. In the next thirty years he published over nine hundred poems and his epic drama in verse, The Dynasts.
(source: Bol.com)

Terok Nor

Before the Dominion War and the decimation of Cardassia…before the coming of the Emissary and the discovery of the wormhole…before space station Terok Nor became Deep Space 9™…there was the Occupation: the military takeover of an alien planet and the violent insurgency that fought against it. Now that fifty-year tale of warring ideologies, terrorism, greed, secret intelligence, moral compromises, and embattled faiths is at last given its due in the three-book saga of *Star Trek*’s Lost Era…
Eighteen years into the Occupation, a new star rises in Bajor’s sky. It is the seat of power in this system, a place of slave labor and harsh summary judgments, the symbol of Cardassian might and the futility of resisting it. But even as the gray metal crown of Terok Nor ascends to its zenith, ragtag pockets of Bajoran rebels — including a fierce young fighter named Kira Nerys — have begun to strike back at their world’s oppressors, and they intend to show the Cardassians that the night belongs to them.

The Tender Bar: A Memoir

Amazon.com Review

“Long before it legally served me, the bar saved me,” asserts J.R. Moehringer, and his compelling memoir The Tender Bar is the story of how and why. A Pulitzer-Prize winning writer for the Los Angeles Times, Moehringer grew up fatherless in pub-heavy Manhasset, New York, in a ramshackle house crammed with cousins and ruled by an eccentric, unkind grandfather. Desperate for a paternal figure, he turns first to his father, a DJ whom he can only access via the radio (Moehringer calls him The Voice and pictures him as “talking smoke”). When The Voice suddenly disappears from the airwaves, Moehringer turns to his hairless Uncle Charlie, and subsequently, Uncle Charlie’s place of employment–a bar called Dickens that soon takes center stage. While Moehringer may occasionally resort to an overwrought metaphor (the footsteps of his family sound like “storm troopers on stilts”), his writing moves at a quick clip and his tale of a dysfunctional but tightly knit community is warmly told. “While I fear that we’re drawn to what abandons us, and to what seems most likely to abandon us, in the end I believe we’re defined by what embraces us,” Moehringer says, and his story makes us believe it. –Brangien Davis

From Publishers Weekly

[Signature]_Reviewed by_ Terry GolwayYou needn’t be a writer to appreciate the romance of the corner tavern—or, for that matter, of the local dive in a suburban strip mall. But perhaps it does take a writer to explain the appeal of these places that ought to offend us on any number of levels—they often smell bad, the decor generally is best viewed through bloodshot eyes and, by night’s end, they usually do not offer an uplifting vision of the human condition.Ah, but what would we do without them, and what would we do without the companionship of fellow pilgrims whose journey through life requires the assistance of a drop or two?J.R. Moehringer, a Pulitzer Prize–winning writer for the Los Angeles Times, has written a memoir that explains it all, and then some. The Tender Bar is the story of a young man who knows his father only as “The Voice,” of a single mother struggling to make a better life for her son, and of a riotously dysfunctional family from Long Island. But more than anything else, Moehringer’s book is a homage to the culture of the local pub. That’s where young J.R. seeks out the companionship of male role models in place of his absent father, where he receives an education that has served him well in his career and where, inevitably, he looks for love, bemoans its absence and mourns its loss.Moehringer grew up in Manhasset, a place, he writes, that “believed in booze.” At a young age, he became a regular—not a drinker, of course, for he was far too young. But while still tender of years, he was introduced to the culture, to the companionship and—yes—to the romance of it all. “Everyone has a holy place, a refuge, where their heart is purer, their mind clearer, where they feel close to God or love or truth or whatever it is they happen to worship,” he writes. For young J.R., that place was a gin mill on Plandome Road where his Uncle Charlie was a bartender and a patron._The Tender Bar_’s emotional climax comes after its native son has found success as a journalist for the Los Angeles Times. On September 11, 2001, almost 50 souls who lived and loved in Moehringer’s home town of Manhasset were killed in the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. One was a bartender we’ve met along the way. Another was one of the author’s cousins.Moehringer drove from Denver, where he was based as a correspondent for the Times, to New York to mourn and comfort old friends. He describes his cousin’s mother, Charlene Byrne, as she grieved: “Charlene was crying, the kind of crying I could tell would last for years.”And so it has, in Manhasset and so many other Long Island commuter towns. Moehringer’s lovely evocation of an ordinary place filled with ordinary people gives dignity and meaning to those lost lives, and to his own.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Tempted

Tempted by Pamela Britton
**He is Alexander Drummond**
Marquis of Warrick, one of the most feared Revenue Commanders to sail the high seas.
**She is Mary Callahan**
Smuggler’s daughter, sent as a spy to his lordship’s household under the guise of a nurse, only…she doesn’t like children.
He thinks she’s the most outspoken, sharp-tongued shrew he’s ever met. She thinks he’s the most uptight, pompous bag of wind she’s ever encountered.
However, then, did they fall in love?
Alexander Drummond, the marquis of Warrick, is no saint, though nowadays he prefers his ‘conquests’ to be found on the high seas. Descended from a long line of rakes, he has vowed to stop dallying with the fairer sex. But now he needs a woman–and extraordinary woman to tame his wildcat of a daughter.
Intelligent, spirited Mary Callahan is the perfect nursemaid for the child, but one look at her bedroom eyes and luscious lips and Alexander is tempted to seduce one last woman. For Mary, masquerading as a nurse and enticing the master of the house is all in a day’s work–until stolen kisses and passionate caresses distract her from her perilous game.
Soon two people who know the risk of mixing danger and desire find themselves on the brink of a shocking scandal, and Alexander is about to discover what happens when he lets and enemy into his house…and his heart.

temporary kings

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Anthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic encompasses a four-volume panorama of twentieth century London. Hailed by Time as “brilliant literary comedy as well as a brilliant sketch of the times,” A Dance to the Music of Time opens just after World War I. Amid the fever of the 1920s and the first chill of the 1930s, Nick Jenkins and his friends confront sex, society, business, and art. In the second volume they move to London in a whirl of marriage and adulteries, fashions and frivolities, personal triumphs and failures. These books “provide an unsurpassed picture, at once gay and melancholy, of social and artistic life in Britain between the wars” (Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.). The third volume follows Nick into army life and evokes London during the blitz. In the climactic final volume, England has won the war and must now count the losses. In this climactic volume of *A Dance to the Music of Time*, Nick Jenkins describes a world of ambition, intrigue, and dissolution. England has won the war, but now the losses, physical and moral, must be counted. Pamela Widmerpool sets a snare for the young writer Trapnel, while her husband suffers private agony and public humiliation. Set against a background of politics, business, high society, and the counterculture in England and Europe, this magnificent work of art sounds an unforgettable requiem for an age. Includes these novels: *Books Do Furnish a Room * *Temporary Kings * *Hearing Secret Harmonies * “Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”—*Chicago Tribune* “A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”—Elizabeth Janeway, *New York Times* “One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”—Naomi Bliven, *New Yorker *

Templars: History and Myth: From Solomon’s Temple to the Freemasons

SUMMARY: An order of warrior monks founded to protect pilgrims to Jerusalem, the Templars were among the wealthiest and most powerful bodies in the medieval world. Yet two centuries later, they were arrested, accused of blasphemy, heresy and orgies, and their leaders were burnt at the stake.Part guide, part history, this book investigates the Templar legends and legacy from the mysteries of Solomons Temple in Jerusalem, via nineteenth century development of the Freemasons, through to Templar appearances in Dan Brown and Indiana Jones.This book explains the whole context of Templar history, including the recent evidence discovered by the Vatican that the Templars were not guilty of heresy. It also features a guide to Templar castles and sites.

The Tempest

Edited, introduced and annotated by Cedric Watts, Research Professor of English, University of Sussex. The Wordsworth Classics’ Shakespeare’s Series presents a newly-edited sequence of William Shakespeare’s works. The textual editing takes account of recent scholarship while giving the material a careful reappraisal. The Tempest is the most lyrical, profound and fascinating of Shakespeare’s late comedies. Prospero, long exiled from Italy with his daughter Miranda, seeks to use his magical powers to defeat his former enemies. Eventually, having proved merciful, he divests himself of that magic, his `art’, and prepares to return to the mainland. The Tempest has often been regarded as Shakespeare’s`farewell to the stage’ before his retirement. In the past, critics emphasised the romantically beautiful features of The Tempest, seeing it as an imaginative fantasia. In recent decades, however, The Tempest has also been treated as a potently political drama which offers controversial insights into colonialism and racism. Frequently staged and diversely filmed, the play has influenced numerous poets and novelists.
**

Tell-All

SUMMARY: Tell-All is many things: a Sunset Boulevard-inflected homage to Old Hollywood when grand dames like Bette Davis and Joan Crawford ruled the roost. A Douglas Sirk-inspired melodrama full of big gestures and muted psychic torment. A veritable Tourettes Syndrome of rat-tat-tat name-dropping, from the A-list to the Z-list. A merciless send-up of of Lillian Hellmans habit of butchering the truth that will have Mary McCarthy cheering from the beyond.Our narrator is Hazie Coogan, who for decades has tended to the outsized needs of Katherine Miss Kathie Kenton, a star of the wattage of Elizabeth Taylor and the emotional torments of Judy Garland. The survivor of multiple marriages, career comebacks and cosmetic surgeries, Miss Kathie lives the way legends should. But danger lurks when gentleman caller Webster Carlton Westward III arrives and worms his way into Miss Kathies heart and boudoir. Hazie discovers that this bounder has already written his celebrity tell-all memoir and that it foretells her death in a forthcoming Lillian Hellman-penned World War II musical extravaganza Unconditional Surrender, in which Miss Kathie portrays Lily defeating Japanese forces from Pearl Harbor to Nagasaki. As the body count mounts, Hazie must execute a plan to save Katherine Kenton for her fans and for posterity.A dark reimagining of All About Eve and an hilarious assault on celebrity, Tell-All is vintage Palahniuk.

Tell No One

Amazon.com Review

David Beck has rebuilt his life since his wife’s murder eight years ago, finishing medical school and establishing himself as a pediatrician, but he’s never forgotten the woman he fell in love with in second grade. And when a mysterious e-mail arrives on the anniversary of their first kiss, with a message and an image that leads him to wonder whether Elizabeth might still be alive, Beck will stop at nothing to find the truth that’s eluded him for so many years. A powerful billionaire is equally determined to make sure his role in her disappearance never comes to light, even if it means destroying an innocent man.

In David Beck, Harlan Coben, the author of the popular series starring sports agent Myron Bolitar (__ et al.) has created a protagonist who shares many of Bolitar’s best qualities–he’s a decent, generous, gentle guy whose loyalty to those he loves is unquestionable. So when he discovers that people he was close to may be responsible not only for Elizabeth’s murder but also the “accidental” death of his father, Beck’s sense of betrayal is as understandable to the reader as his uncharacteristically violent reaction. Coben is a skillful storyteller with a gift for creating likable characters caught up in circumstances that illuminate their complex emotional lives and deep humanity. This should be the thriller that breaks this talented writer out of the mystery genre and earns him the recognition he deserves. –Jane Adams

From Publishers Weekly

Every writer likes to stretch his legs, and here Coben, author of seven acclaimed Myron Bolitar mysteries (Darkest Fear, etc.), stretches his. He doesn’t quite kick his reputation aside in the process. This thriller, Coben’s first non-Bolitar novel, is a breezy enough read, but it’s not up to snuff. It’s got a nifty setup, though. David Beck and Elizabeth Parker, just-married childhood sweethearts, are vacationing at the Beck family retreat when Beck is knocked unconscious and Elizabeth is kidnapped. Cut to eight years later: Beck is a young physician working with ghetto kids in Manhattan, and Elizabeth, we learn, is dead, victim of a serial killer known as KillRoy. Or is she? For immediately after two bodies eight years old are uncovered on the Beck land, Beck receives a series of e-mails apparently from Elizabeth. His frantic search to find out if she lives dovetails with the equally frenzied efforts of cops to pin Elizabeth’s murder on Beck, as well as the antic moves of a mysterious billionaire an old friend of the Beck family and his two hired thugs to frame Beck for that murder. Beck finds himself a man on the run from the cops his only ally a black drug dealer whose child he’s treating for hemophilia caught in an overcomplicated tangle of lies and vengeance. Coben knows how to move pages, and he generates considerable suspense, but there’s little new here. The narrative style is cloned from James Patterson, alternating first-person with third. The villains, particularly the billionaire and a Chinese martial artist, are as old as mid-Elmore Leonard or even Chandler. The black drug dealer isn’t a character, he’s a plot device, and the climax packs the emotional wallop of a strong episode of The Rockford Files. (June 19)Forecast: Heavy-hitting blurbs from Jeffery Deaver and Phillip Margolin, among others, indicate more about the solidarity of the mystery community than about this book’s excellence, but should attract browsers. The publisher will pitch this as a summer beach read, and it’s not a bad one. In fact, it may outsell Coben’s mysteries, despite its flaws.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Teatro in Versi: Una Partita a Scacchi. Il Trionfo D’Amore. 11. Ed. 1890

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.