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The Publisher: Henry Luce and His American Century

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Acclaimed historian Alan Brinkley gives us a sharply realized portrait of Henry Luce, arguably the most important publisher of the twentieth century.As the founder of *Time*, *Fortune, *and *Life *magazines, Luce changed the way we consume news and the way we understand our world. Born the son of missionaries, Henry Luce spent his childhood in rural China, yet he glimpsed a milieu of power altogether different at Hotchkiss and later at Yale. While working at a Baltimore newspaper, he and Brit Hadden conceived the idea of *Time*: a “news-magazine” that would condense the week’s events in a format accessible to increasingly busy members of the middle class. They launched it in 1923, and young Luce quickly became a publishing titan. In 1936, after *Time*’s unexpected success—and Hadden’s early death—Luce published the first issue of *Life,* to which millions soon subscribed.Brinkley shows how Luce reinvented the magazine industry in just a decade. The appeal of *Life* seemingly cut across the lines of race, class, and gender. Luce himself wielded influence hitherto unknown among journalists. By the early 1940s, he had come to see his magazines as vehicles to advocate for America’s involvement in the escalating international crisis, in the process popularizing the phrase “World War II.” In spite of Luce’s great success, happiness eluded him. His second marriage—to the glamorous playwright, politician, and diplomat Clare Boothe—was a shambles. Luce spent his later years in isolation, consumed at times with conspiracy theories and peculiar vendettas. *The Publisher* tells a great American story of spectacular achievement—yet it never loses sight of the public and private costs at which that achievement came.

The Prince and the Pauper

SUMMARY: The Prince and the Pauper, by Mark Twain, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today’s top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader’s viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader’s understanding of these enduring works. When Mark Twain’s The Prince and the Pauper was published in 1881, the Atlanta Constitution sang its praises in no uncertain terms: “The book comes upon the reading public in the shape of a revelation.” A timeless tale of switched identities, Twain’s story revolves around the miserably poor Tom Canty “of Offal Court,” who is lucky enough to trade his rags for the gilded robes of England’s prince, Edward Tudor. As each boy is mistaken for the other, Tom enters a realm of privilege and pleasure beyond his most delirious dreams, while Edward plunges into a cruel, dangerous world of beggars and thieves, cutthroats and killers. Befriended by the heroic Miles Hendon, Edward struggles to survive on the squalid streets of London, in the process learning about the underside of life in “Merry England.”With its mixing of high adventure, raucous comedy, and scathing social criticism, presented in a hilarious faux-sixteenth-century vernacular that only Mark Twain could fashion, The Prince and the Pauper remains one of this incomparable humorist’s most popular and oft-dramatized tales.Robert Tine is the author of six novels, including State of Grace and Black Market. He has written for a variety of periodicals and magazines, from the New York Times to Newsweek.

The Pretty Committee Strikes Back

SUMMARY: Meet The Clique, the five girls who rule Octavian Country Day School . . .There’s Massie, with her glossy bob and laser-whitened smile, uncontested leader of the Clique. Dylan, second in command, spends her time sucking up to Massie. Alicia, as sneaky as she is beautiful, wants to be leader of the group one day ? and she just might. Then there’s Kristen, smart, hardworking, who doesn’t suffer fools gladly. And Claire, in by the skin of her teeth, is the newest member of The Clique ? but has swapping her hand-me-down clothes for Chanel No. 19 really solved all her problems?Apparently not. When the girls at pack up their warmest cashmere coats for a trip to Lake Placid, they discover that bears aren’t the only scary things in the woods. The Briarwood boys are staying in a cabin way to close for comfort ? and it’s up to Massie’s Underground Clinic for Kissing (MUCK) to save immaculately-made-up face . . .

The Presence

From School Library Journal

YA?Dr. Katharine Sundquist is hired to work on a short term archaeology project in beautiful Maui. It seems to be an ideal situation for her and her 16-year-old son, Michael, who suffers from asthma as well as the recent death of his father. She soon learns, however, that all is not well in paradise. There is a restricted wing in her high-tech laboratory where secret deliveries arrive at midnight and she discovers that deadly medical experiments are being performed. Then Michael and three friends sneak into a dive shop and help themselves to some equipment. During their night dive, they come upon a contaminated area in the ocean. Back on land, they find that their lungs cannot tolerate oxygen and they can survive only by breathing poisonous fumes. One by one, the boys are killed or simply vanish. When Michael is the only one left alive, Katharine must act quickly to save him. YAs will be engrossed in the computer search for DNA codes, the strange prehistoric or not so prehistoric bones that Katharine unearths, and a mysterious underwater geode from outer space. There is enough adventure and suspense in this thriller to capture the interest of even the most reluctant readers.?Katherine Fitch, Lake Braddock Middle School, Burke, VA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Saul, who recently took a cue from Stephen King with the release of a serialized novel, The Blackstone Chronicles, here tells of a young archaeologist’s encounter with horror in Hawaii.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

The Power of Habit

A young woman walks into a laboratory. Over the past two years, she has transformed almost every aspect of her life. She has quit smoking, run a marathon, and been promoted at work. The patterns inside her brain, neurologists discover, have fundamentally changed.

Marketers at Procter & Gamble study videos of people making their beds. They are desperately trying to figure out how to sell a new product called Febreze, on track to be one of the biggest flops in company history. Suddenly, one of them detects a nearly imperceptible pattern–and with a slight shift in advertising, Febreze goes on to earn a billion dollars a year.

An untested CEO takes over one of the largest companies in America. His first order of business is attacking a single pattern among his employees–how they approach worker safety–and soon the firm, Alcoa, becomes the top performer in the Dow Jones.

What do all these people have in common? They achieved success by focusing on the…

The Poison Eaters: And Other Stories

SUMMARY: In her debut collection, “New York Times” best-selling author Holly Black returns to the world of “Tithe” in two darkly exquisite new tales. Then Black takes readers on a tour of a faerie market and introduces a girl poisonous to the touch and another who challenges the devil to a competitive eating match. These stories have been published in anthologies such as “21 Proms,” “The Faery Reel,” and “The Restless Dead,” and have been reprinted in many “Best of” anthologies. “The Poison Eater”s is Holly Black’s much-anticipated first collection of stories, and her ability to stare into the void–and to find humanity and humor there–will speak to young adult and adult readers alike. Illustrated by Theo Black. Holly Black is the author of “Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale” (an ALA Best Book for Young Adults) and two related novels, “Valiant” (Norton Award winner, an ALA Best Book for Young Adults, an ALA Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Adult Readers, CCBC Choices) and “Ironside.” Her latest novel, “White Cat” is the first of a new series, The Curseworkers. She and Tony DiTerlizzi created the best-selling Spiderwick Chronicles. She is working on a graphic novel series, The Good Neighbors, with artist Ted Naifeh. She and her husband, Theo, live in Massachusetts.

The Plantation

SUMMARY: The first to disappear is a ski instructor, out for a morning jog in the secluded mountains of Colorado. Hours later, a pregnant woman is abducted from a crowded hospital and smuggled past security without a hitch. Two places, two incidents, a single motive. One by one, in cities across America, people of all ages are being taken from their homes, their cars, their lives. But these aren’t random kidnappings. They’re crimes of passion, planned and researched several months in advance, then executed with a singular objective in mind. Ariane Walker is one of the victims, dragged from her apartment with no obvious signs of a struggle. The cops said there is little they can do for her. There isn’t enough evidence to go on. Not enough time has passed. But that isn’t good enough for Jonathon Payne. He loves Ariane and isn’t about to sit around while her trail runs cold. Using the skills that he learned in the Maniacs, a special branch of the U.S. military, Payne and his best friend, David Jones, give chase, trekking to New Orleans on little more than a whim, hoping that Payne’s gut instinct pays off. It does. With the help of several locals, the duo slowly begin to uncover the mystery of Walker’s abduction and the shocking truth behind Louisiana’s best-kept secret; The Plantation.

The Piano Teacher

EDITORIAL REVIEW: ** “A rare and exquisite story…Transports you out of time, out of place, into a world you can feel on your very skin.” -Elizabeth Gilbert ** In the sweeping tradition of *The English Patient*, Janice Y.K. Lee’s debut novel is a tale of love and betrayal set in war-torn Hong Kong. In 1942, Englishman Will Truesdale falls headlong into a passionate relationship with Trudy Liang, a beautiful Eurasian socialite. But their affair is soon threatened by the invasion of the Japanese as World War II overwhelms their part of the world. Ten years later, Claire Pendleton comes to Hong Kong to work as a piano teacher and also begins a fateful affair. As the threads of this spellbinding novel intertwine, impossible choices emerge-between love and safety, courage and survival, the present, and above all, the past.

The Petrified Ants

SUMMARY: Look at the Birdie is a collection of fourteen previously unpublished short stories from one of the most original writers in all of American fiction. In this series of perfectly rendered vignettes, written just as he was starting to find his comic voice, Kurt Vonnegut paints a warm, wise, and often funny portrait of life in post-World War II America-a world where squabbling couples, high school geniuses, misfit office workers, and small-town lotharios struggle to adapt to changing technology, moral ambiguity, and unprecedented affluence. Vonnegut explores the relationship between science’s pursuit of truth and the state’s need to control it in “”The Petrified Ants,”” a darkly whimsical story about two Soviet researchers who stumble upon an amazing discovery, only to learn that natural history is also written by the hand that wields the power. “”The Petrified Ants”” and the thirteen other never-before-published pieces that comprise Look at the Birdie serve as an unexpected gift for devoted readers who thought that Kurt Vonnegut’s unique voice had been stilled forever-and provide a terrific introduction to his short fiction for anyone who has yet to experience his genius. Other stories from Look at the Birdie available as single-story e-books: On sale August 25, 2009″Hello, Red” On sale October 20, 2009: “Confido””FUBAR””Shout About It from the Housetops””Ed Luby’s Key Club””A Song for Selma””Hall of Mirrors””The Nice Little People””Little Drops of Water””The Honor of a Newsboy””Look at the Birdie” (Short Story)”King and Queen of the Universe””The Good Explainer”

The Perfect Woman

EDITORIAL REVIEW: One Man’s Obsession. . . Pharmacy clerk William Dremmel is hooked–on drugging pretty young women and lulling them into slow, blissfully quiet deaths. Then he packs his victims in luggage–a nod to the cops that he works alone. Dremmel’s no fool, he’s also a college professor. He just likes using his intellect for darker purposes. . .. Is Another Man’s Anguish. . . Haunted by his own daughter’s unsolved disappearance, Detective John Stallings is committed to finding runaways and busting their abductors. When a series of girls is found dead and stuffed into duffle bags, he’s consumed with capturing “The Bagman”–at the risk of his marriage, his career, and possibly his tough-as-nails partner, Patty Levine. . . And Neither Intends To Give Up As The Bagman grows more brazen in his crimes, the clues line up. But when he draws terrifyingly close to Patty, Stallings is determined to play by his own rules–and they won’t be pretty–or quiet. . . “One of the best cop novels to come along in years. Hard-hitting, fast-paced, yet heart-felt, *Perfect Woman* gives us a portrayal of policing as gritty and realistic as the best nonfiction. And what a great hero, Det. John Stallings. . . . We need more cops (and thriller characters) like him!” –Jeffery Deaver, *New York Times *bestselling author “This book moves with deadly speed and the assured hand of a writer who knows his stuff.” –Michael Connelly, *New York Times* bestselling author “An insider’s view of how a true police investigation unfolds. It’s as close a look at police work as you can get.” –Elmore Leonard, *New York Times* bestselling author “A perfect thriller for Hollywood to grab. The author’s police experience and knowledge of the turf keeps the police action highly visual and at a boiling point throughout.” –Joseph Wambaugh *”The Perfect Woman* delivers perfect suspense. You won’t be able to put this book down!” –Kevin O’Brien, *New York Times* bestselling author “One of the best cop novels to come along in years. Hard-hitting, fast-paced, yet heart-felt, *Perfect Woman* gives us a portrayal of policing as gritty and realistic as the best nonfiction. And what a great hero, Det. John Stallings. . . . We need more cops (and thriller characters) like him!” –Jeffery Deaver, *New York Times* bestselling author

The Penelopiad

From Publishers Weekly

Drawing on a range of sources, in addition to The Odyssey, Atwood scripts the narrative of Penelope, the faithful and devoted wife of Odysseus and her 12 maids, who were killed upon the master’s return. Atwood proposes striking interpretations of her characters that challenge the patriarchal nature of Greek mythology. The chapters transition between the firsthand account of Penelope and the chorus of maids as listeners are taken from Penelope’s early life to her afterlife. Laural Merlington charmingly delivers the witty and perceptive Penelope with realistic inflection and emphasis. Some of her vocal caricatures seem over the top, but most voices maintain a resemblance to our perceptions of these mythic people. The maids are presented as a saddened chorus by a cloning of Merlington’s voice. These dark figures speak straightforwardly in their accusations of Penelope and Odysseus, while, at other times, they make use of rhyming. This format works well, though sometimes the cadence and rhyming scheme are off beat. This benefits the production by creating an eerie resonance and haunting demeanor that enhances this engaging tale.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

National Bestseller

The Penelopiad_ _is a brilliant tour de force that takes an aspect of The Odyssey_ _and opens up new vistas. . . . Atwood takes Penelope’s braininess and puts her at the centre. . . . Odysseus’s 20-year absence leaves lots of room for development; this is just the kind of thing that a retelling of a myth should do. . . . [Atwood] turns a gruesome, barbaric episode into an ironic tragedy of double agents.”
–_National Post_

“Two things are apparent when you begin reading The Penelopiad. First, this is a writer who is confidently at the height of her powers. And, second, she’s having fun.”
–_The Vancouver Sun
_
“Atwood’s putting Penelope in the starring role is a fine and fresh revisioning. . . . Somehow (it is a measure of her genius that one cannot quite say how), she makes us hear the voice of Penelope, reflecting in Hades on her life, as if it were the voice of the most interesting gossip you have ever had coffee with. . . . This is a wonderful book.”
–_The Globe and Mail _

“Feels like a breath of fresh air blown in from the Mediterranean Sea. . . . The Penelopiad_ _is Atwood in top form. The woman who wrote The Handmaid’s Tale_ _hasn’t lost her acerbic touch.”
–_The Gazette _(Montreal)

“What . . . emerge[s] is a startling commentary on the responsibility of power, and of how privilege can shade into complicity. The Penelopiad_ is anything but a woe-is-woman discourse. . . . _adds Atwood’s sly, compassionate voice to the myth of Odysseus and Penelope and, in doing so, increases its already great depth.”
–_Calgary Herald_

“In this exquisitely poised book, Atwood blends intimate humour with a finely tempered outrage at the terrible injustice of the maids, phrasing both in language as potent as a curse.”
–_Sunday Times _(UK)

“Penelope flies with the help of the sardonic, dead-pan voice Atwood lends her, a tone — half Dorothy Parker, half Desperate housewives.”
–_The Independent _(UK)

“‘Spry’ is a word that could almost have been invented to describe Margaret Atwood, who beadily and wittily retells the events surrounding The Odyssey_ _through the voice of Penelope. Pragmatic, clever, domestic, mournful, Penelope is a perfect Atwood heroine.”
–_The Spectator _(UK)

“Alter[s] one’s point of view toward [the story], imbuing it with a modern sensibility yet revealing some eternal truths about men, women, and the issue of power, including the power to shape a narrative. . . . Atwood shows with intelligence and wit just how complicated and unpretty love can be.”
–_O, The Oprah Magazine_

“Along with her presentation of the hallucinatory maids and Penelope’s straight talk about her husband, her girly laments about the ferocious competition of Helen and her queenly worries about fending off the suitors, Atwood’s brilliance emerges in the skillful way she has woven her own research on the anthropological underpinnings of Homer’s epic into the patterns of her own stylized version of the poem. . . . A fascinating and rather attractive version of this old, old story, a creation tale about the founding of our civilization meant to be heard over and over and over.”
–_Chicago Tribune
_
“Atwood paints a shrewdly insightful picture of what life in those days might actually have been like. . . . By turns slyly funny and fiercely indignant, Ms. Atwood’s imaginative, ingeniously-constructed ‘deconstruction’ of the old tale reveals it in a new–and refreshingly different–light.”
–_The Washington Times

_“Atwood’s 17th work of fiction is a gem…flaunts an acid wit and a generous dose of lyricism…In Atwood’s imagination, Penelope and her handmaids are remarkably complex: They are simultaneously ancient and modern, lighthearted and grief-stricken, disenfranchised and powerful.”
–_Baltimore Sun_

The Passage

SUMMARY: “It happened fast. Thirty-two minutes for one world to die, another to be born.” First, the unthinkable: a security breach at a secret U.S. government facility unleashes the monstrous product of a chilling military experiment. Then, the unspeakable: a night of chaos and carnage gives way to sunrise on a nation, and ultimately a world, forever altered. All that remains for the stunned survivors is the long fight ahead and a future ruled by fear-of darkness, of death, of a fate far worse. As civilization swiftly crumbles into a primal landscape of predators and prey, two people flee in search of sanctuary. FBI agent Brad Wolgast is a good man haunted by what he’s done in the line of duty. Six-year-old orphan Amy Harper Bellafonte is a refugee from the doomed scientific project that has triggered apocalypse. He is determined to protect her from the horror set loose by her captors. But for Amy, escaping the bloody fallout is only the beginning of a much longer odyssey-spanning miles and decades-towards the time and place where she must finish what should never have begun. With The Passage, award-winning author Justin Cronin has written both a relentlessly suspenseful adventure and an epic chronicle of human endurance in the face of unprecedented catastrophe and unimaginable danger. Its inventive storytelling, masterful prose, and depth of human insight mark it as a crucial and transcendent work of modern fiction. From the Hardcover edition.

The Outsiders

The Outsiders is a collection of 13 dark fantasy stories from some of the best names and bright new names in dark fiction. An eclectic mix of styles and genres lurk within these pages…so uncork a glass of wine, dim the lights, sit back in a comfy chair…and enjoy this offering from Ghostwriter Publications.

The Opposite of Invisible

From School Library Journal

Grade 8–10—Alice has never been part of the in-crowd at school. She hangs with the artsies, as well as her best friend, a boy named Jewel whom she has known since grade school. Then one day something weird happens—a popular football player named Simon starts noticing her. Jewel starts noticing her too. In the course of one week, both boys kiss her and she likes both kisses equally. Initially, she dates Simon, and, as a result, her friendship with Jewel is shattered, and she must make a decision about what’s really important to her. The story is upbeat, but the pacing is slow, and the plot is a bit obvious. However, the mood of reflection is sustained throughout, the characters are fully fleshed out, and high school life is accurately portrayed.—_Jennifer-Lynn Draper, Children’s Literature Consultant, Aurora, ON, Canada_
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Description

“Gallagher’s debut—like Alice—shines.”—VOYA

Alice and Jewel have been best friends since grade school. Together, they don’t need anyone else, and together they blend into the background of high school. Invisible. To Alice, Jewel is the opposite of invisible. Jewel is her best friend who goes to indie concerts and art shows with her. Jewel scoffs at school dances with her. Alice is so comfortable around Jewel that she can talk to him about almost anything.

But she can’t tell him that she likes the cool, popular Simon. Simon asks her to the school dance the same day that Jewel kisses her for the first time. Still, she can’t say no to Simon. He seems like the easy choice, the one she’s attracted to, the one she’s ready for. But will it mean losing Jewel?

In a bright debut novel set against the lively backdrop of Seattle, Alice must learn the difference between love and a crush and what it means to be yourself when you’re not sure who that is yet.

The Odyssey

EDITORIAL REVIEW: *The Odyssey*, by **Homer**, is part of the *Barnes & Noble Classics** *series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of *Barnes & Noble Classics*: New introductions commissioned from today’s top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader’s viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. *Barnes & Noble Classics *pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader’s understanding of these enduring works. Long before *The Lord of the Rings*, *Star Wars*, and Harry Potter, the ancient Greek poet **Homer** established the standard for tales of epic quests and heroic journeys with *The Odyssey*. Crowded with characters, both human and non-human, and bursting with action, *The Odyssey* details the adventures of Odysseus, king of Ithaca and hero of the Trojan War, as he struggles to return to his home and his waiting, ever-faithful wife, Penelope. Along the way he encounters the seductive Circe, who changes men into swine; the gorgeous water-nymph, Calypso, who keeps him a “prisoner of love” for seven years; the terrible, one-eyed, man-eating giant Cyclops; and a host of other ogres, wizards, sirens, and gods. But when he finally reaches Ithaca after ten years of travel, his trials have only begun. There he must battle the scheming noblemen who, thinking him dead, have demanded that Penelope choose one of them to be her new husband—and Ithaca’s new king. Often called the “second work of Western literature” (The Iliad, also by Homer, being the first), *The Odyssey* is not only a rousing adventure drama, but also a profound meditation on courage, loyalty, family, fate, and undying love. More than three thousand years old, it was the first story to delineate carefully and exhaustively a single character arc — a narrative structure that serves as the foundation and heart of the modern novel. Robert Squillace’s revision of George Herbert Palmer’s classic prose translation captures the drama and vitality of adventure, while remaining true to the original Homeric language.**Robert Squillace** teaches in the Cultural Foundations division of New York University’s General Studies Program. He has published numerous essays on literature and the book Modernism, Modernity and Arnold Bennett.

The Nobodies Album

SUMMARY: From the bestselling author of The Dogs of Babel comes a dazzling literary mystery about the lengths to which some people will go to rewrite their past. Bestselling novelist Octavia Frost has just completed her latest book—a revolutionary novel in which she has rewritten the last chapters of all her previous books, removing clues about her personal life concealed within, especially a horrific tragedy that befell her family years ago. On her way to deliver the manuscript to her editor, Octavia reads a news crawl in Times Square and learns that her rock-star son, Milo, has been arrested for murder. Though she and Milo haven’t spoken in years—an estrangement stemming from that tragic day—she drops everything to go to him. The “last chapters” of Octavia’s novel are layered throughout The Nobodies  Album—the scattered puzzle pieces to her and Milo’s dark and troubled past. Did she drive her son to murder? Did Milo murder anyone at all? And what exactly happened all those years ago? As the novel builds to a stunning reveal, Octavia must consider how this story will come to a close. Universally praised for her candid explorations of the human psyche, Parkhurst delivers an emotionally gripping and resonant mystery about a mother and her son, and about the possibility that one can never truly know another person.