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Adventure of the Devil’s Foot

In recording from time to time some of the curious experiences and interesting recollections which I associate with my long and intimate friendship with Mr. Sherlock Holmes, I have continually been faced by difficulties caused by his own aversion to publicity. To his sombre and cynical spirit all popular applause was always abhorrent, and nothing amused him more at the end of a successful case than to hand over the actual exposure to some orthodox official, and to listen with a mocking smile to the general chorus of misplaced congratulation. It was indeed this attitude upon the part of my friend and certainly not any lack of interesting material which has caused me of late years to lay very few of my records before the public. My participation in some of his adventures was always a privilege which entailed discretion and reticence upon me.

The Adventure of the Dancing Men

Holmes had been seated for some hours in silence with his long, thin back curved over a chemical vessel in which he was brewing a particularly malodorous product. His head was sunk upon his breast, and he looked from my point of view like a strange, lank bird, with dull gray plumage and a black top-knot. “So, Watson,” said he, suddenly, “you do not propose to invest in South African securities?” I gave a start of astonishment. Accustomed as I was to Holmes’s curious faculties, this sudden intrusion into my most intimate thoughts was utterly inexplicable. “How on earth do you know that?” I asked.

The Adventure of the Copper Beeches

Sherlock Holmes, the world’s “only unofficial consulting detective”, was first introduced to readers in A Study in Scarlet published by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. It was with the publication of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, however, that the master sleuth grew tremendously in popularity, later to become one of the most beloved literary characters of all time.In this book series, the short stories comprising The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes have been amusingly illustrated using only Lego® brand minifigures and bricks. The illustrations recreate, through custom designed Lego models, the composition of the black and white drawings by Sidney Paget that accompanied the original publication of these adventures appearing in The Strand Magazine from July 1891 to June 1892. Paget’s iconic illustrations are largely responsible for the popular image of Sherlock Holmes, including his deerstalker cap and Inverness cape, details never mentioned in the writings of Conan Doyle.This uniquely illustrated collection, which features some of the most famous and enjoyable cases investigated by Sherlock Holmes and his devoted friend and biographer Dr. John H. Watson, including A Sandal in Bohemia and The Red-Headed League, is sure to delight Lego enthusiasts, as well as fans of the Great Detective, both old and new.LEGO® is a trademark of the LEGO Group of Companies. The LEGO Group has not been involved in nor has it in any other way licensed or authorised the publication of this book.THE ADVENTURE OF THE COPPER BEECHES: A young lady named Violet Hunter visits Baker Street seeking the advice of Sherlock Holmes on whether to accept a job as governess which commands a generous salary, but with some peculiar conditions. Two weeks after ultimately accepting the position, Miss Hunter calls Holmes to The Copper Beaches, an estate in Hampshire, to look into the singular, and at times terrifying, behaviour of her employers.

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Complete Brand New Edition “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the second of the twelve Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine in 1892. Miss Susan Cushing of Croydon receives a parcel in the post that contains two severed human ears packed in coarse salt. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard suspects a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their unruly behaviour. The parcel was sent from Belfast, the city of origin of one of the former boarders. Upon examining the parcel himself, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime. He reasons that a medical student with access to a dissection laboratory would likely use something other than plain salt to preserve human remains, and would be able to make a more precise cut than the roughly hacked ears suggest. The address on the package, roughly written and with a spelling correction, suggests to Holmes that the sender lacks education and is unfamiliar with Croydon. The knot in the string suggests to Holmes that they are looking for someone with sailing experience. **
### Sinossi
The Adventure of the Cardboard Box By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Complete Brand New Edition “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the second of the twelve Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine in 1892. Miss Susan Cushing of Croydon receives a parcel in the post that contains two severed human ears packed in coarse salt. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard suspects a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their unruly behaviour. The parcel was sent from Belfast, the city of origin of one of the former boarders. Upon examining the parcel himself, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime. He reasons that a medical student with access to a dissection laboratory would likely use something other than plain salt to preserve human remains, and would be able to make a more precise cut than the roughly hacked ears suggest. The address on the package, roughly written and with a spelling correction, suggests to Holmes that the sender lacks education and is unfamiliar with Croydon. The knot in the string suggests to Holmes that they are looking for someone with sailing experience.

The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle

Once in London on Christmas Eve at the hotel has committed a larceny. Countess of Morcar has been stolen a precious diamond which was called Blue Carbuncle. It was one of the most expensive gems in the world. Suspicions has fallen on John Horner he has been working at the hotel as a plumber. He was imprisoned for robbery because previously he had served out in prison for the same crime. Plumber to denied a charge but nobody believed him. At the same time on one of the streets of London ruffians attacked the man. Nearly of that place was walking a commissionaire Peterson and like an honest person he had decided help that man and to defended against of them. The attacked man had run away and dropped the goose which he carried with him. Peterson took the goose home to eat the bird and his wife had pulled out of it a diamond. This diamond the honest man Peterson had brought to Holmes. **

The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet

A banker, Mr. Alexander Holder of Streatham, makes a loan of £50,000 to a socially prominent client, who leaves the Beryl Coronet — one of the most valuable public possessions in existence — as collateral. Holder feels that he must not leave this rare and precious piece of jewellery in his personal safe at the bank, and so he takes it home with him to lock it up there. He is awakened in the night by a noise, enters his dressing room, and is horrified to see his son Arthur with the coronet in his hands, apparently trying to bend it. Holder’s niece Mary comes at the sound of all the shouting and, seeing the damaged coronet, faints dead away. Three beryls are missing from it. In a panic, Mr. Holder travels to see Holmes, who agrees to take the case. The case against Arthur seems rather damning, yet Holmes is not convinced of his guilt. Why has Arthur clammed up? Why is he refusing to give a statement of any kind? How could Arthur have broken the coronet (even Holmes, who has exceptionally strong hands, can’t do it) and without making any noise? Could any other people in the household be involved, such as the servants, or Mary? Could some visitor, such as the maid’s wooden-legged boyfriend, or Arthur’s rakish friend Sir George Burnwell, have something to do with what happened to the coronet? The failure to resolve the case will result in Mr. Holder’s dishonour, and a national scandal.

The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton

In “The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton”, Holmes is hired by a lady who is being harassed by Milverton, a notorious blackmailer who has ruined many people and caused many more grief. Though he is determined to stop him, Milverton is very crafty and Holmes is unable to find the evidence necessary to put him away. Finally, Holmes and Watson decide on a daring plan to retrieve their client’s incriminating letters. While there, they witness a crime that forces Holmes and Watson to make a momentous choice.

Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal

It’s no secret that psychedelic drugs have the ability to cast light on the miraculous reality hidden within our psyche. Almost immediately after the discovery of LSD less than a hundred years ago, psychedelics began to play a crucial role in the quest to understand the link between mind and matter. With an uncanny ability to reveal the mind’s remote frontiers and the unmapped areas of human consciousness, LSD and MDMA (better known as Ecstasy) have proven extraordinarily effective in treating anxiety disorders such as PTSD—yet the drugs remain illegal for millions of people who might benefit from them.
Anchoring Tom Shroder’s *Acid Test* are the stories of Rick Doblin, the founder and executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), who has been fighting government prohibition of psychedelics for more than thirty years; Michael Mithoefer, a former emergency room physician, now a psychiatrist at the forefront of psychedelic therapy research; and his patient Nicholas Blackston, a former Marine who has suffered unfathomable mental anguish from the effects of brutal combat experiences in Iraq. All three men are passionate, relatable people; each flawed, each resilient, and each eccentric, yet very familiar and very human.
*Acid Test* covers the first heady years of experimentation in the fifties and sixties, through the backlash of the seventies and eighties, when the drug subculture exploded and uncontrolled use of street psychedelics led to a PR nightmare that created the drug stereotypes of the present day. Meticulously researched and astoundingly informative, this is at once a personal story of intertwining lives against an epic backdrop, and a compelling argument for the unprecedented healing properties of drugs that have for decades been characterized as dangerous, illicit substances.
**
### Recensione
“With increasing support on both sides of the Atlantic for an end to the war on drugs, journalist Tom Shroder presents a compelling look at the therapeutic benefits of psychedelic drugs. Take a trip through the history, science and politics behind the headlines that should end with a long-overdue national conversation.” — * **Big Issue** *
### Sinossi
It’s no secret that psychedelic drugs have the ability to cast light on the miraculous reality hidden within our psyche. Almost immediately after the discovery of LSD less than a hundred years ago, psychedelics began to play a crucial role in the quest to understand the link between mind and matter. With an uncanny ability to reveal the mind’s remote frontiers and the unmapped areas of human consciousness, LSD and MDMA (better known as Ecstasy) have proven extraordinarily effective in treating anxiety disorders such as PTSD—yet the drugs remain illegal for millions of people who might benefit from them.
Anchoring Tom Shroder’s *Acid Test* are the stories of Rick Doblin, the founder and executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), who has been fighting government prohibition of psychedelics for more than thirty years; Michael Mithoefer, a former emergency room physician, now a psychiatrist at the forefront of psychedelic therapy research; and his patient Nicholas Blackston, a former Marine who has suffered unfathomable mental anguish from the effects of brutal combat experiences in Iraq. All three men are passionate, relatable people; each flawed, each resilient, and each eccentric, yet very familiar and very human.
*Acid Test* covers the first heady years of experimentation in the fifties and sixties, through the backlash of the seventies and eighties, when the drug subculture exploded and uncontrolled use of street psychedelics led to a PR nightmare that created the drug stereotypes of the present day. Meticulously researched and astoundingly informative, this is at once a personal story of intertwining lives against an epic backdrop, and a compelling argument for the unprecedented healing properties of drugs that have for decades been characterized as dangerous, illicit substances.

97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement

“Social history is, most elementally, food history. Jane Ziegelman had the great idea to zero in on one Lower East Side tenement building, and through it she has crafted a unique and aromatic narrative of New York’s immigrant culture: with bread in the oven, steam rising from pots, and the family gathering round.” — Russell Shorto, author of The Island at the Center of the World 97 Orchard is a richly detailed investigation of the lives and culinary habits—shopping, cooking, and eating—of five families of various ethnicities living at the turn of the twentieth century in one tenement on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. With 40 recipes included, 97 Orchard is perfect for fans of Rachel Ray’s Hometown Eats; anyone interested in the history of how immigrant food became American food; and “foodies” of every stripe.

21 Lessons for the 21st Century

****THE NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER*** * **Sapiens showed us where we came from. Homo Deus looked to the future. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century explores the present.** How can we protect ourselves from nuclear war, ecological cataclysms and technological disruptions? What can we do about the epidemic of fake news or the threat of terrorism? What should we teach our children? Yuval Noah Harari takes us on a thrilling journey through today’s most urgent issues. The golden thread running through his exhilarating new book is the challenge of maintaining our collective and individual focus in the face of constant and disorienting change. Are we still capable of understanding the world we have created? **‘** **Fascinating** … **compelling** … **[Harari] has teed up a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the 21st century** **’ Bill Gates, *New York Times ** ***‘Truly mind-expanding… Ultra-topical’* Guardian*** **
### Recensione
” **Fascinating** … **compelling** … **[Harari] has teed up a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the 21st century**.” (Bill Gates *New York Times* )
” **The great thinker of our age.** ” ( *The Times* )
” **Truly mind-expanding** … **Ultra-topical** … Harari’s big selling point [is] the ambition and breadth of his work, **smashing together unexpected ideas into dazzling observations**.” ( *Guardian* )
” **Erudite, illuminating, vivid**. [Harari’s] lessons suggest new ways of thinking about current problems… **a splendid, sobering, stirring call to arms.** ” ( *Sunday Times* )
” **There is surely no one alive who is better at explaining our world** than Yuval Noah Harari – he is the lecturer we all wish we’d had at university. Reading this book, I must have interrupted my partner a hundred times to pass on fascinating things I’d just read. **Harari has done it again** \- ***21 Lessons* is, simply put, a crucial book.** ” (Adam Kay)
“More comprehensible [than *Sapiens* and *Homo Deus* ]… showing you things you thought you knew about in a completely new way… **I find Harari’s writing exhilarating.** ” ( *Radio Times* )
” **Harari thrills his readers because he addresses the biggest possible topics with confidence and brio**. Compared with the subjects he tackles, anything else we might read looks piffling and parochial.” ( *Evening Standard* )
“Harari’s **genius** at weaving together insights from different disciplines, ranging from ancient history to neuroscience to philosophy to artificial intelligence, has enabled him to respond to the clamour to understand where we have come from and where we might be heading… ***21 Lessons* is lit up by flashes of intellectual adventure and literary verve.** ” ( *Financial Times* )
“Written in the author’s trademark lucid prose, the book makes difficult concept comprehensible, and is very much a work for our times… ***21 Lessons* absorbs from start to finish.** ” (Ian Thomson *Tablet* )
” **A terrific primer on where we are now and where we might be heading** … Harari is a **superb** global cartographer, and ***21 Lessons for the 21st Century* is a lucid and essential read.** ” (Marina Vaizey *Arts Desk* )
### Sinossi
****THE NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER*** ***Sapiens showed us where we came from. Homo Deus looked to the future. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century explores the present.** How can we protect ourselves from nuclear war, ecological cataclysms and technological disruptions? What can we do about the epidemic of fake news or the threat of terrorism? What should we teach our children? Yuval Noah Harari takes us on a thrilling journey through today’s most urgent issues. The golden thread running through his exhilarating new book is the challenge of maintaining our collective and individual focus in the face of constant and disorienting change. Are we still capable of understanding the world we have created? **‘** **Fascinating** … **compelling** … **[Harari] has teed up a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the 21st century** **’ Bill Gates,* New York Times ** ***‘Truly mind-expanding… Ultra-topical’* Guardian***

The 100 Thing Challenge

The author tells the intriguing story of his attempt to whittle down all his possessions to only 100 things, discusses lessons learned and offers ways for readers to take on the challenge. Original. 40,000 first printing.
**Recensie(s)**

Living simply is only an ideal until someone like Bruno gets particular. The way he got particular should make everyone think–hard, which is a very good thing. — Mark Noll, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History, University of Notre Dame In a loving, wise, sometimes hilarious manner, Dave Bruno holds a mirror up to us and says to take a closer look at how we’re living. Reading this will lead you to a better life. — Dean Nelson, Author of God Hides in Plain Sight and director of the journalism program at Point Loma Nazarene University [Bruno’s] musings about his slow and steady purge have developed a cult following online, inspiring others [toward] clutter-free living. — Time magazine
(source: Bol.com)

Liar’s Poker

**The time was the 1980s. The place was Wall Street. The game was called Liar’s Poker.**
Michael Lewis was fresh out of Princeton and the London School of Economics when he landed a job at Salomon Brothers, one of Wall Street’s premier investment firms. During the next three years, Lewis rose from callow trainee to bond salesman, raking in millions for the firm and cashing in on a modern-day gold rush. *Liar’s Poker* is the culmination of those heady, frenzied years—a behind-the-scenes look at a unique and turbulent time in American business. From the frat-boy camaraderie of the forty-first-floor trading room to the killer instinct that made ambitious young men gamble everything on a high-stakes game of bluffing and deception, here is Michael Lewis’s knowing and hilarious insider’s account of an unprecedented era of greed, gluttony, and outrageous fortune. .

Zefira

Chi sono i buoni? Chi sono i cattivi? A leggere i dossier, custoditi in un archivio segreto del commissariato di Zefira, c’è da restare impietriti. I ruoli si ribaltano e prende forma quella zona d’ombra che sta intorno e sopra la ’ndrangheta. Il vero sistema di potere, che tiene in pugno la Calabria, emerge in tutta la sua dimensione; escono dal buio i volti dei presunti eroi, strateghi di luttuose trame. Ogni morte e ogni crimine nascondono una verità diversa da quella che appare, poiché a quelle latitudini nulla è come sembra. A percorrere i viali di Zefira, colmi di sole e di oleandri, si avverte il peso di un destino nero forgiato da una stirpe antica che incombe sulla città. Ma dopo l’ultimo agguato si apprende con sorpresa, fuori dal cimitero, che a Zefira, la vita ha sempre il sopravvento. Un sindaco assassinato, un vecchio soldato nazista vissuto in Aspromonte e un latitante mafioso porteranno il commissario Luca Rustici a un passo dalla verità. O forse soltanto davanti a una scelta.

Volevo tanto che fossi tu

A trent’anni anni Marta Rodriguez può dire di aver raggiunto l’equilibrio che cercava, sebbene si sia ritrovata a crescere una figlia da sola e abbia avuto un passato tutt’altro che facile. Insieme a Patricia e Adrian, i suoi amici inseparabili, lavora da Lola Herrera, l’atelier di abiti da flamenco più famoso di Madrid. Marta vive da sola con la figlia Vanesa, ha appena chiuso una relazione tormentata e di uomini non ne vuole proprio sapere. Ma non ha fatto i conti con l’arrivo di Philip Martínez, un uomo d’affari inglese, biondo e con l’aria da bravo ragazzo: esattamente l’opposto del tipo di uomo da cui Marta si sente attratta… Per questo è certa di non correre il rischio di innamorarsi di lui. Eppure Philip è l’uomo più attento e gentile che lei abbia mai conosciuto, e il suo sorriso è davvero irresistibile. Se soltanto Vanesa non lo trovasse insopportabile, e lui non fosse il figlio del cliente più importante dell’atelier…

Vivere o morire. Dialogo sul senso dell’esistenza tra Platone e Nietzsche

Giovanissimo talento innamorato della filosofia classica (Carmelo Vigna), “pensatore a suo modo classico” (Mario Vegetti), “rondine di una nuova auspicabile primavera filosofica” (Costanzo Preve), Luca Grecchi lascia qui sullo sfondo i suoi consueti studi sulla filosofia greca antica e sull’umanesimo metafisico, per impegnarsi in un’opera di fantasia, di contenuto indubbiamente filosofico, ma che possiamo definire letteraria. Questo libro propone infatti un immaginario incontro fra Platone e Nietzsche, reso possibile dal terzo personaggio sulla scena: il tempo. L’incontro – che ha come tema di fondo, appunto, la ricerca del senso della esistenza umana – si svolge in cinque giorni. Platone e Nietzsche parlano di temi biografici, dell’amore, di metafisica, di politica e della morte. Un testo, dunque, che – pur se iscritto nel genere divertissement – sollecita a riflettere in modo appassionato sui contenuti eterni della condizione umana.

Le Vichinghe Volanti

Camilleri è un cantastorie, nessuno come lui riesce ad ammaliare i lettori con i suoi racconti, narrazioni inesauribili come quelle delle Mille e una notte. Vigàta è il teatro dove abitano i suoi personaggi, borghesia benpensante, poveretti ingenui, uomini di rispetto. E soprattutto donne; in questa raccolta è infatti l’amore il tema dominante, declinato nelle sue innumerevoli varianti dalla passione all’erotismo, dal tradimento alle situazioni boccaccesche.