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First Flight

SUMMARY: The past is another country, in Mary Robinette Kowal’s Tor.com tale of time travel and aviation history. “First Flight” is a finalist for the 2010 Locus Award. The winner of the 2008 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, Mary Robinette Kowal is the author of short fiction published in Strange Horizons, Cosmos, and Asimov’s. Her first novel, Shades of Milk and Honey, will be published by Tor in 2010.

SUMMARY: The past is another country, in Mary Robinette Kowal’s Tor.com tale of time travel and aviation history. “First Flight” is a finalist for the 2010 Locus Award. The winner of the 2008 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, Mary Robinette Kowal is the author of short fiction published in Strange Horizons, Cosmos, and Asimov’s. Her first novel, Shades of Milk and Honey, will be published by Tor in 2010.

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First Contact: Or, It’s Later Than You Think

SUMMARY: A satirical joyride in the tradition of Kurt Vonnegut and Douglas Adams, First Contact introduces us to the hyper-intelligent Rigelians, who admire Woody Allen movies and Bundt cake, and who urge the people of Earth to mend their ways to avoid destruction of their planet. But the president of the United States, a God-fearing, science-doubting fitness fanatic, is skeptical of the evidence presented to him and sets in motion a chain of events that will change the lives of his young attach, an alien scam artist, several raccoons, and a scientist who has predicted the end of the universe. Parrot sketch excluded.

SUMMARY: A satirical joyride in the tradition of Kurt Vonnegut and Douglas Adams, First Contact introduces us to the hyper-intelligent Rigelians, who admire Woody Allen movies and Bundt cake, and who urge the people of Earth to mend their ways to avoid destruction of their planet. But the president of the United States, a God-fearing, science-doubting fitness fanatic, is skeptical of the evidence presented to him and sets in motion a chain of events that will change the lives of his young attach, an alien scam artist, several raccoons, and a scientist who has predicted the end of the universe. Parrot sketch excluded.

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First and Only

In the nightmare future of Warhammer 40,000, the galaxy-spanning Imperium is riven with dangers. In the Chaos-infested Sabbat system, Imperial Commissar Gaunt must lead his men through as much in-fighting amongst rival regiments as against the forces of Chaos. First and Only is an epic saga of planetary conquest, grand ambition, treachery and honour.

In the nightmare future of Warhammer 40,000, the galaxy-spanning Imperium is riven with dangers. In the Chaos-infested Sabbat system, Imperial Commissar Gaunt must lead his men through as much in-fighting amongst rival regiments as against the forces of Chaos. First and Only is an epic saga of planetary conquest, grand ambition, treachery and honour.

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Firewall

SUMMARY: Stopping to get money from a cash machine one evening, a man inexplicably falls to the ground: dead. A taxi driver is brutally murdered by two teenaged girls. Quickly apprehended they appal local policemen with their total lack of remorse. One girl escapes police custody and disappears without trace. Soon afterwards a blackout covers half the country. When an engineer arrives at the malfunctioning power station, he makes a grisly discovery. Inspector Kurt Wallander is sure that these events must be linked – somehow. Hampered by the discovery of betrayals in his own team, lonely and frustrated, Wallander begins to lose conviction in his role as a detective. The search for answers leads Wallander dangerously close to a shadowy group of anarchic terrorists, hidden within the anonymity of cyberspace. Somehow these criminals seem always to know the police’s next move. Wallander finds himself fighting to outsmart them In their gripping police procedural about our increasing vulnerability in the modern digitalised world.

SUMMARY: Stopping to get money from a cash machine one evening, a man inexplicably falls to the ground: dead. A taxi driver is brutally murdered by two teenaged girls. Quickly apprehended they appal local policemen with their total lack of remorse. One girl escapes police custody and disappears without trace. Soon afterwards a blackout covers half the country. When an engineer arrives at the malfunctioning power station, he makes a grisly discovery. Inspector Kurt Wallander is sure that these events must be linked – somehow. Hampered by the discovery of betrayals in his own team, lonely and frustrated, Wallander begins to lose conviction in his role as a detective. The search for answers leads Wallander dangerously close to a shadowy group of anarchic terrorists, hidden within the anonymity of cyberspace. Somehow these criminals seem always to know the police’s next move. Wallander finds himself fighting to outsmart them In their gripping police procedural about our increasing vulnerability in the modern digitalised world.

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Fireflies in December

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Jessilyn Lassiter never knew that hatred could lurk in the human heart until the summer of 1932 when she turned 13. When her best friend, Gemma, loses her parents in a tragic fire, Jessilyn’s father vows to care for her as one of his own, despite the fact that Gemma is black and prejudice is prevalent in their southern Virginia town. Violence springs up as a ragtag band of Ku Klux Klan members unite and decide to take matters into their own hands. As tensions mount in the small community, loyalties are tested and Jessilyn is forced to say good-bye to the carefree days of her youth. *Fireflies in December* is the 2007 winner of the Christian Writers Guild’s Operation First Novel contest, and a 2010 Christy Award winner.

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Jessilyn Lassiter never knew that hatred could lurk in the human heart until the summer of 1932 when she turned 13. When her best friend, Gemma, loses her parents in a tragic fire, Jessilyn’s father vows to care for her as one of his own, despite the fact that Gemma is black and prejudice is prevalent in their southern Virginia town. Violence springs up as a ragtag band of Ku Klux Klan members unite and decide to take matters into their own hands. As tensions mount in the small community, loyalties are tested and Jessilyn is forced to say good-bye to the carefree days of her youth. *Fireflies in December* is the 2007 winner of the Christian Writers Guild’s Operation First Novel contest, and a 2010 Christy Award winner.

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A fire upon the deep

Amazon.com Review

In this Hugo-winning 1991 SF novel, Vernor Vinge gives us a wild new cosmology, a galaxy-spanning “Net of a Million Lies,” some finely imagined aliens, and much nail-biting suspense.

Faster-than-light travel remains impossible near Earth, deep in the galaxy’s Slow Zone–but physical laws relax in the surrounding Beyond. Outside that again is the Transcend, full of unguessable, godlike “Powers.” When human meddling wakes an old Power, the Blight, this spreads like a wildfire mind virus that turns whole civilizations into its unthinking tools. And the half-mythical Countermeasure, if it exists, is lost with two human children on primitive Tines World.

Serious complications follow. One paranoid alien alliance blames humanity for the Blight and launches a genocidal strike. Pham Nuwen, the man who knows about Countermeasure, escapes this ruin in the spacecraft Out of Band–heading for more violence and treachery, with 500 warships soon in hot pursuit. On his destination world, the fascinating Tines are intelligent only in combination: named “individuals” are small packs of the doglike aliens. Primitive doesn’t mean stupid, and opposed Tine leaders wheedle the young castaways for information about guns and radios. Low-tech war looms, with elaborately nested betrayals and schemes to seize Out of Band if it ever arrives. The tension becomes extreme… while half the Beyond debates the issues on galactic Usenet.

Vinge’s climax is suitably mindboggling. This epic combines the flash and dazzle of old-style space opera with modern, polished thoughtfulness. Pham Nuwen also appears in the nifty prequel set 30,000 years earlier, __. Both recommended. –David Langford, Amazon.co.uk

From Publishers Weekly

It has been six years since Vinge’s last book ( Marooned in Realtime ), but the wait proves worthwhile in this stimulating tale filled with ideas, action and likable, believable characters, both alien and human. Vinge presents a galaxy divided into Zones–regions where different physical constraints allow very different technological and mental possibilities. Earth remains in the “Slowness” zone, where nothing can travel faster than light and minds are fairly limited. The action of the book is in the “Beyond,” where translight travel and other marvels exist, and humans are one of many intelligent species. One human colony has been experimenting with ancient technology in order to find a path to the “Transcend,” where intelligence and power are so great as to seem godlike. Instead they release the Blight, an evil power, from a billion-year captivity. As the Blight begins to spread, a few humans flee with a secret that might destroy it, but they are stranded in a primitive low-tech world barely in the Beyond. While the Blight destroys whole races and star systems, a team of two humans and two aliens races to rescue the others, pursued by the Blight’s agents and other enemies. With uninterrupted pacing, suspense without contrivance, and deftly drawn aliens who can be pleasantly comical without becoming cute, Vinge offers heart-pounding, mind-expanding science fiction at its best.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Amazon.com Review

In this Hugo-winning 1991 SF novel, Vernor Vinge gives us a wild new cosmology, a galaxy-spanning “Net of a Million Lies,” some finely imagined aliens, and much nail-biting suspense.

Faster-than-light travel remains impossible near Earth, deep in the galaxy’s Slow Zone–but physical laws relax in the surrounding Beyond. Outside that again is the Transcend, full of unguessable, godlike “Powers.” When human meddling wakes an old Power, the Blight, this spreads like a wildfire mind virus that turns whole civilizations into its unthinking tools. And the half-mythical Countermeasure, if it exists, is lost with two human children on primitive Tines World.

Serious complications follow. One paranoid alien alliance blames humanity for the Blight and launches a genocidal strike. Pham Nuwen, the man who knows about Countermeasure, escapes this ruin in the spacecraft Out of Band–heading for more violence and treachery, with 500 warships soon in hot pursuit. On his destination world, the fascinating Tines are intelligent only in combination: named “individuals” are small packs of the doglike aliens. Primitive doesn’t mean stupid, and opposed Tine leaders wheedle the young castaways for information about guns and radios. Low-tech war looms, with elaborately nested betrayals and schemes to seize Out of Band if it ever arrives. The tension becomes extreme… while half the Beyond debates the issues on galactic Usenet.

Vinge’s climax is suitably mindboggling. This epic combines the flash and dazzle of old-style space opera with modern, polished thoughtfulness. Pham Nuwen also appears in the nifty prequel set 30,000 years earlier, __. Both recommended. –David Langford, Amazon.co.uk

From Publishers Weekly

It has been six years since Vinge’s last book ( Marooned in Realtime ), but the wait proves worthwhile in this stimulating tale filled with ideas, action and likable, believable characters, both alien and human. Vinge presents a galaxy divided into Zones–regions where different physical constraints allow very different technological and mental possibilities. Earth remains in the “Slowness” zone, where nothing can travel faster than light and minds are fairly limited. The action of the book is in the “Beyond,” where translight travel and other marvels exist, and humans are one of many intelligent species. One human colony has been experimenting with ancient technology in order to find a path to the “Transcend,” where intelligence and power are so great as to seem godlike. Instead they release the Blight, an evil power, from a billion-year captivity. As the Blight begins to spread, a few humans flee with a secret that might destroy it, but they are stranded in a primitive low-tech world barely in the Beyond. While the Blight destroys whole races and star systems, a team of two humans and two aliens races to rescue the others, pursued by the Blight’s agents and other enemies. With uninterrupted pacing, suspense without contrivance, and deftly drawn aliens who can be pleasantly comical without becoming cute, Vinge offers heart-pounding, mind-expanding science fiction at its best.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Fine Things

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Smart, likable, Bernie Fine was the wonder boy of Wolff’s, New York’s most glamorous department store. A senior VP moving up, he arrives in San Fransisco to open a West Coast store. His career is skyrocketing, but his life is lacking a center. When he looks into the wide, innocent eyes of five-year-old Jane O’Reilly, and then into the equally enchanting eyes of her mother, Liz, Bernie knows he has found what he has been looking for. Bernie thought he had found love to last a lifetime, but when Liz is stricken with cancer shortly after the birth of their first child, time becomes painfully short. Alone with two children, Bernie must face the loss and learn how to move on. New people, new experiences, a new life alone with two kids. He meets it with courage and humor, and learns some of life’s hard but precious lessons as he does.”Steel is one of the best.” — “Los Angeles Times”

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Smart, likable, Bernie Fine was the wonder boy of Wolff’s, New York’s most glamorous department store. A senior VP moving up, he arrives in San Fransisco to open a West Coast store. His career is skyrocketing, but his life is lacking a center. When he looks into the wide, innocent eyes of five-year-old Jane O’Reilly, and then into the equally enchanting eyes of her mother, Liz, Bernie knows he has found what he has been looking for. Bernie thought he had found love to last a lifetime, but when Liz is stricken with cancer shortly after the birth of their first child, time becomes painfully short. Alone with two children, Bernie must face the loss and learn how to move on. New people, new experiences, a new life alone with two kids. He meets it with courage and humor, and learns some of life’s hard but precious lessons as he does.”Steel is one of the best.” — “Los Angeles Times”

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Fiendish Deeds

Fiendish Deeds (The Joy of Spooking Series #1) by P.J. Bracegirdle
It’s the terrible town on the hideous hill — and Joy Wells is a proud resident. A fan of classic horror stories, Joy is convinced that famous author E. A. Peugeot based his spine-tingling tales on Spooking. Take the eerie similarities between the nearby swamp and the setting of his masterpiece, “The Bawl of the Bog Fiend.” Could the story be true? Could the bog fiend be on the loose?
Things become truly horrifying when Joy learns that Darlington, the despicable suburban city where she is forced to go to school, is planning to build a water park over her beloved bog. It is up to her to safeguard the endangered area and its secrets. Little does she know that there is someone determined to destroy not only the bog but the town of Spooking itself — and anyone who dares stand in his way.
P. J. Bracegirdle spins a yarn of delicious devilry and macabre mayhem in the very first book of *The Joy of Spooking* trilogy.

Fiendish Deeds (The Joy of Spooking Series #1) by P.J. Bracegirdle
It’s the terrible town on the hideous hill — and Joy Wells is a proud resident. A fan of classic horror stories, Joy is convinced that famous author E. A. Peugeot based his spine-tingling tales on Spooking. Take the eerie similarities between the nearby swamp and the setting of his masterpiece, “The Bawl of the Bog Fiend.” Could the story be true? Could the bog fiend be on the loose?
Things become truly horrifying when Joy learns that Darlington, the despicable suburban city where she is forced to go to school, is planning to build a water park over her beloved bog. It is up to her to safeguard the endangered area and its secrets. Little does she know that there is someone determined to destroy not only the bog but the town of Spooking itself — and anyone who dares stand in his way.
P. J. Bracegirdle spins a yarn of delicious devilry and macabre mayhem in the very first book of *The Joy of Spooking* trilogy.

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Fever Pitch

Amazon.com Review

In the States, Nick Hornby is best know as the author of and , two wickedly funny novels about being thirtysomething and going nowhere fast. In Britain he is revered for his status as a fanatical football writer (sorry, fanatical soccer writer), owing to Fever Pitch–which is both an autobiography and a footballing Bible rolled into one. Hornby pinpoints 1968 as his formative year–the year he turned 11, the year his parents separated, and the year his father first took him to watch Arsenal play. The author quickly moved “way beyond fandom” into an extreme obsession that has dominated his life, loves, and relationships. His father had initially hoped that Saturday afternoon matches would draw the two closer together, but instead Hornby became completely besotted with the game at the expense of any conversation: “Football may have provided us with a new medium through which we could communicate, but that was not to say that we used it, or what we chose to say was necessarily positive.” Girlfriends also played second fiddle to one ball and 11 men. He fantasizes that even if a girlfriend “went into labor at an impossible moment” he would not be able to help out until after the final whistle.

Fever Pitch is not a typical memoir–there are no chapters, just a series of match reports falling into three time frames (childhood, young adulthood, manhood). While watching the May 2, 1972, Reading v. Arsenal match, it became embarrassingly obvious to the then 15-year-old that his white, suburban, middle-class roots made him a wimp with no sense of identity: “Yorkshire men, Lancastrians, Scots, the Irish, blacks, the rich, the poor, even Americans and Australians have something they can sit in pubs and bars and weep about.” But a boy from Maidenhead could only dream of coming from a place with “its own tube station and West Indian community and terrible, insoluble social problems.”

Fever Pitch reveals the very special intricacies of British football, which readers new to the game will find astonishing, and which Hornby presents with remarkable humor and honesty–the “unique” chants sung at matches, the cold rain-soaked terraces, giant cans of warm beer, the trains known as football specials carrying fans to and from matches in prisonlike conditions, bottles smashing on the tracks, thousands of policemen waiting in anticipation for the cargo of hooligans. The sport and one team in particular have crept into every aspect of Hornby’s life–making him see the world through Arsenal-tinted spectacles. –Naomi Gesinger

From Publishers Weekly

Brought to print to take advantage of America’s presumed fascination with the ’94 World Cup (the first ever held here), Fever Pitch is a 24-year obsessional diary of English club football (soccer, to us Americans) games Hornby has witnessed and the way these games have become inextricable from his personal life. Hornby is the kind of fanatic who merely shrugs about the “tyranny” the sport exerts over his life–the mumbled excuses he must give at every missed christening or birthday party as a result of a schedule conflict. “Sometimes hurting someone,” he writes, “is unavoidable.” These occasions tend to bring out “disappointment and tired impatience” in his friends and family, but it is when he is exposed as a “worthless, shallow worm” that the similarly stricken reader can relate to the high costs of caring deeply about a game that means nothing to one’s more well-adjusted friends. These moments are fleeting, however. The book has not been tailored for American audiences, so readers lacking a knowledge of English club football’s rules, traditions, history and players will be left completely in the dark by Hornby’s obscure references. Unfortunately, he has neither Roger Angell’s ability to take us inside the game nor the pathos of Frederick Exley’s brilliantly disturbed autobiographical trilogy. Though Hornby does show flashes of real humor, Fever Pitch features mainly pedestrian insights on life and sport, and then it’s on to the next game–the equivalent, for an American reader, of a nil-nil tie. Author appearances.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Amazon.com Review

In the States, Nick Hornby is best know as the author of and , two wickedly funny novels about being thirtysomething and going nowhere fast. In Britain he is revered for his status as a fanatical football writer (sorry, fanatical soccer writer), owing to Fever Pitch–which is both an autobiography and a footballing Bible rolled into one. Hornby pinpoints 1968 as his formative year–the year he turned 11, the year his parents separated, and the year his father first took him to watch Arsenal play. The author quickly moved “way beyond fandom” into an extreme obsession that has dominated his life, loves, and relationships. His father had initially hoped that Saturday afternoon matches would draw the two closer together, but instead Hornby became completely besotted with the game at the expense of any conversation: “Football may have provided us with a new medium through which we could communicate, but that was not to say that we used it, or what we chose to say was necessarily positive.” Girlfriends also played second fiddle to one ball and 11 men. He fantasizes that even if a girlfriend “went into labor at an impossible moment” he would not be able to help out until after the final whistle.

Fever Pitch is not a typical memoir–there are no chapters, just a series of match reports falling into three time frames (childhood, young adulthood, manhood). While watching the May 2, 1972, Reading v. Arsenal match, it became embarrassingly obvious to the then 15-year-old that his white, suburban, middle-class roots made him a wimp with no sense of identity: “Yorkshire men, Lancastrians, Scots, the Irish, blacks, the rich, the poor, even Americans and Australians have something they can sit in pubs and bars and weep about.” But a boy from Maidenhead could only dream of coming from a place with “its own tube station and West Indian community and terrible, insoluble social problems.”

Fever Pitch reveals the very special intricacies of British football, which readers new to the game will find astonishing, and which Hornby presents with remarkable humor and honesty–the “unique” chants sung at matches, the cold rain-soaked terraces, giant cans of warm beer, the trains known as football specials carrying fans to and from matches in prisonlike conditions, bottles smashing on the tracks, thousands of policemen waiting in anticipation for the cargo of hooligans. The sport and one team in particular have crept into every aspect of Hornby’s life–making him see the world through Arsenal-tinted spectacles. –Naomi Gesinger

From Publishers Weekly

Brought to print to take advantage of America’s presumed fascination with the ’94 World Cup (the first ever held here), Fever Pitch is a 24-year obsessional diary of English club football (soccer, to us Americans) games Hornby has witnessed and the way these games have become inextricable from his personal life. Hornby is the kind of fanatic who merely shrugs about the “tyranny” the sport exerts over his life–the mumbled excuses he must give at every missed christening or birthday party as a result of a schedule conflict. “Sometimes hurting someone,” he writes, “is unavoidable.” These occasions tend to bring out “disappointment and tired impatience” in his friends and family, but it is when he is exposed as a “worthless, shallow worm” that the similarly stricken reader can relate to the high costs of caring deeply about a game that means nothing to one’s more well-adjusted friends. These moments are fleeting, however. The book has not been tailored for American audiences, so readers lacking a knowledge of English club football’s rules, traditions, history and players will be left completely in the dark by Hornby’s obscure references. Unfortunately, he has neither Roger Angell’s ability to take us inside the game nor the pathos of Frederick Exley’s brilliantly disturbed autobiographical trilogy. Though Hornby does show flashes of real humor, Fever Pitch features mainly pedestrian insights on life and sport, and then it’s on to the next game–the equivalent, for an American reader, of a nil-nil tie. Author appearances.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Feed

The year was 2014. We had cured cancer. We had beaten the common cold. But in doing so we created something new, something terrible that no one could stop. The infection spread, virus blocks taking over bodies and minds with one, unstoppable command: FEED. Now, twenty years after the Rising, bloggers Georgia and Shaun Mason are on the trail of the biggest story of their lives – the dark conspiracy behind the infected. The truth will get out, even if it kills them.
(source: Bol.com)

The year was 2014. We had cured cancer. We had beaten the common cold. But in doing so we created something new, something terrible that no one could stop. The infection spread, virus blocks taking over bodies and minds with one, unstoppable command: FEED. Now, twenty years after the Rising, bloggers Georgia and Shaun Mason are on the trail of the biggest story of their lives – the dark conspiracy behind the infected. The truth will get out, even if it kills them.
(source: Bol.com)

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Fed Up

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **The latest in a series with “all the right ingredients-fresh characters, a dash of humor and a sizzling romance.”(*Elaine Viets*)** Part-time student Chloe Carter is planning her best friend’s wedding, working for her parents-and glued to her chef boyfriend, Josh, as he competes to star in a new TV series. The premise: Josh hijacks unsuspecting grocery shoppers and prepares them gourmet dinners. Everything’s going great-until one shopper drops dead. With the cameras on him from the beginning, Josh is obviously innocent, but Chloe wonders: Was it one of Josh’s competitors? Or the deceased’s husband? Or someone on the crew? Sifting through suspects, Chloe deals with wedding chaos and Josh’s erratic behavior. She’ll have to balance her plate while trying to catch a food felon…

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **The latest in a series with “all the right ingredients-fresh characters, a dash of humor and a sizzling romance.”(*Elaine Viets*)** Part-time student Chloe Carter is planning her best friend’s wedding, working for her parents-and glued to her chef boyfriend, Josh, as he competes to star in a new TV series. The premise: Josh hijacks unsuspecting grocery shoppers and prepares them gourmet dinners. Everything’s going great-until one shopper drops dead. With the cameras on him from the beginning, Josh is obviously innocent, but Chloe wonders: Was it one of Josh’s competitors? Or the deceased’s husband? Or someone on the crew? Sifting through suspects, Chloe deals with wedding chaos and Josh’s erratic behavior. She’ll have to balance her plate while trying to catch a food felon…

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Fearless Jones

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Paris Minton is minding his own business – a small used-book store of which he is the proud proprietor – when a beautiful woman walks in and asks a few questions. Before he knows it, Paris has been beaten up, slept with, shot at, robbed, and his bookstore has been burnt to the ground. He?s in so much trouble he has no choice but to get his friend Fearless Jones out of jail to help him. Things get scary fast as they look into this woman?s past, and the more they learn, the harder it gets – as black men in 1950s L.A. they have few rights, little money, and no recourse under attack. Fearless is written with the dazzling pace of noir classics like The Maltese Falcon, but with the humor and brilliant insights into American times, places and morals that have made Walter Mosley?s novels bestsellers.
**

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Paris Minton is minding his own business – a small used-book store of which he is the proud proprietor – when a beautiful woman walks in and asks a few questions. Before he knows it, Paris has been beaten up, slept with, shot at, robbed, and his bookstore has been burnt to the ground. He?s in so much trouble he has no choice but to get his friend Fearless Jones out of jail to help him. Things get scary fast as they look into this woman?s past, and the more they learn, the harder it gets – as black men in 1950s L.A. they have few rights, little money, and no recourse under attack. Fearless is written with the dazzling pace of noir classics like The Maltese Falcon, but with the humor and brilliant insights into American times, places and morals that have made Walter Mosley?s novels bestsellers.
**

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Fear Nothing

SUMMARY: Christopher Snow is different from all the other residents of Moonlight Bay, different from anyone you’ve ever met. For Christopher Snow has made his peace with a very rare genetic disorder that leaves him dangerously vulnerable to light. His life is filled with the fascinating rituals of one who must embrace the dark. He knows the night as no one else can — its mystery, its beauty, its terrors, and the eerie silken rhythms that seduce one into believing anything — even freedom — is possible. Until the night Christopher Snow witnesses a series of disturbing incidents that sweep him into a violent mystery only he can solve, a mystery that will force him to rise above all fears and confront the many-layered secrets of Moonlight Bay and its strange inhabitants. A place, like all places, that looks a lot different after dark. If you think you’ve got it tough, meet Christopher Snow, the hero of Dean Koontz’s novel Fear Nothing. Not only did his parents die under mysterious circumstances, but he’s also being stalked by shadowy characters who want Snow to stop trying to find out how they died–or else they’ll bump off his remaining loved ones (his supersmart, beer-lapping dog Orson; his best surfing buddy Bobby; and his late-night deejay girlfriend Sasha). And as if being on the lam in his own hometown, Moonlight Bay, California, isn’t bad enough, Snow has to outrun his pursuers without leaving town. He has XP–xeroderma pigmentosum–a rare genetic affliction that forces him to avoid light. Cumulative exposure to sun, fluorescent lights, and the like will give him cancer eventually, and he doesn’t dare leave the place where he’s skillfully “done the mambo with melanoma” for all of his 28 years. Koontz makes the night-town of Moonlight Bay come alive in this sometimes pulse-pounding, sometimes funny, but mostly rather lyrical thriller. Fans of Koontz’s legendary 1986 novel Watchers will love this book’s similar theme: our hero and a loveable super-dog deal with a genetic engineering laboratory run amok. Horror fans will savor the evil mutant rhesus “millennium monkeys” who hunt Snow, the few scenes of eloquent gore, and the plight of certain mutating townsfolk who are, as they put it, “becoming” something very creepy. Koontz gives Snow and Bobby a lingo that does for surfer talk what Austin Powers did for the Swinging ’60s, and his metaphors are almost as madcap as Tom Robbins’s: “As the chains of the swinging light fixture torqued, the links twisted against one another with enough friction to cause an eerie ringing, as if lizard-eyed altar boys in blood-soaked cassocks and surplices were ringing the unmelodious bells of a satanic mass.” Sometimes Koontz’s style goes over the top and wipes out, surfer-style, but for the most part, Fear Nothing will have readers bellowing “Cowabunga!” YA-Christopher Snow understands the night. He, like the owl, is nocturnal, living on the mysterious darker edge of society. Snow is afflicted with xeroderma pigmentosum, a rare and often-fatal genetic disease that makes ultraviolet rays-even those from lamps and televisions-deadly. His condition makes him a pariah in the isolated small town of Moonlight Bay where the ignorant and insensitive fear what they do not know. As the action begins, Snow’s father dies, leaving him with only a handful of offbeat but fiercely loyal friends to turn to for understanding. At the morgue, Snow accidentally witnesses his father’s body being replaced with the mutilated corpse of a vagrant. Before he can find out what is behind this scandal, he receives a frantic summons from a friend who is brutally murdered before she can finish explaining a strange story about monkeys and a secret project at the government compound at the edge of town. What begins as a disturbing puzzle quickly becomes a sinister conspiracy as Snow uncovers evidence of uncanny intelligence in many of the local animals and inhumanely vicious tendencies in some of the human residents of the Bay. They are “becoming” he learns, but becoming what? Chilling chase scenes steadily increase the breakneck pace as Snow, assisted by his remarkable dog, is pursued through the night by unseen forces. Despite some clunky and unnecessary surfer slang, fans will go wild for this well-plotted thriller.                                Robin Deffendall, Prince William Public Library System, VA Bantam brags that it is launching the biggest Koontz campaign ever with this thriller, whose protagonist lives by night (he has a genetic order that makes him highly sensitive to light) until he witnesses a murder. length: (cm)17.8                 width:(cm)10.7

SUMMARY: Christopher Snow is different from all the other residents of Moonlight Bay, different from anyone you’ve ever met. For Christopher Snow has made his peace with a very rare genetic disorder that leaves him dangerously vulnerable to light. His life is filled with the fascinating rituals of one who must embrace the dark. He knows the night as no one else can — its mystery, its beauty, its terrors, and the eerie silken rhythms that seduce one into believing anything — even freedom — is possible. Until the night Christopher Snow witnesses a series of disturbing incidents that sweep him into a violent mystery only he can solve, a mystery that will force him to rise above all fears and confront the many-layered secrets of Moonlight Bay and its strange inhabitants. A place, like all places, that looks a lot different after dark. If you think you’ve got it tough, meet Christopher Snow, the hero of Dean Koontz’s novel Fear Nothing. Not only did his parents die under mysterious circumstances, but he’s also being stalked by shadowy characters who want Snow to stop trying to find out how they died–or else they’ll bump off his remaining loved ones (his supersmart, beer-lapping dog Orson; his best surfing buddy Bobby; and his late-night deejay girlfriend Sasha). And as if being on the lam in his own hometown, Moonlight Bay, California, isn’t bad enough, Snow has to outrun his pursuers without leaving town. He has XP–xeroderma pigmentosum–a rare genetic affliction that forces him to avoid light. Cumulative exposure to sun, fluorescent lights, and the like will give him cancer eventually, and he doesn’t dare leave the place where he’s skillfully “done the mambo with melanoma” for all of his 28 years. Koontz makes the night-town of Moonlight Bay come alive in this sometimes pulse-pounding, sometimes funny, but mostly rather lyrical thriller. Fans of Koontz’s legendary 1986 novel Watchers will love this book’s similar theme: our hero and a loveable super-dog deal with a genetic engineering laboratory run amok. Horror fans will savor the evil mutant rhesus “millennium monkeys” who hunt Snow, the few scenes of eloquent gore, and the plight of certain mutating townsfolk who are, as they put it, “becoming” something very creepy. Koontz gives Snow and Bobby a lingo that does for surfer talk what Austin Powers did for the Swinging ’60s, and his metaphors are almost as madcap as Tom Robbins’s: “As the chains of the swinging light fixture torqued, the links twisted against one another with enough friction to cause an eerie ringing, as if lizard-eyed altar boys in blood-soaked cassocks and surplices were ringing the unmelodious bells of a satanic mass.” Sometimes Koontz’s style goes over the top and wipes out, surfer-style, but for the most part, Fear Nothing will have readers bellowing “Cowabunga!” YA-Christopher Snow understands the night. He, like the owl, is nocturnal, living on the mysterious darker edge of society. Snow is afflicted with xeroderma pigmentosum, a rare and often-fatal genetic disease that makes ultraviolet rays-even those from lamps and televisions-deadly. His condition makes him a pariah in the isolated small town of Moonlight Bay where the ignorant and insensitive fear what they do not know. As the action begins, Snow’s father dies, leaving him with only a handful of offbeat but fiercely loyal friends to turn to for understanding. At the morgue, Snow accidentally witnesses his father’s body being replaced with the mutilated corpse of a vagrant. Before he can find out what is behind this scandal, he receives a frantic summons from a friend who is brutally murdered before she can finish explaining a strange story about monkeys and a secret project at the government compound at the edge of town. What begins as a disturbing puzzle quickly becomes a sinister conspiracy as Snow uncovers evidence of uncanny intelligence in many of the local animals and inhumanely vicious tendencies in some of the human residents of the Bay. They are “becoming” he learns, but becoming what? Chilling chase scenes steadily increase the breakneck pace as Snow, assisted by his remarkable dog, is pursued through the night by unseen forces. Despite some clunky and unnecessary surfer slang, fans will go wild for this well-plotted thriller.                                Robin Deffendall, Prince William Public Library System, VA Bantam brags that it is launching the biggest Koontz campaign ever with this thriller, whose protagonist lives by night (he has a genetic order that makes him highly sensitive to light) until he witnesses a murder. length: (cm)17.8                 width:(cm)10.7

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Fear Itself

Paris Minton doesn?t want any trouble. He minds his used bookstore and his own business. But in 1950s Los Angeles, sometimes trouble finds him, no matter how hard he tries to avoid it. When the nephew of the wealthiest woman in L.A. is missing and wanted for murder, she has to get involved?no matter if she can?t stand him. What will her church think? She hires Jefferson T. Hill, a former sheriff of Dawson, Texas, and a tough customer, to track him down and prove his innocence. When Hill goes missing too, she tricks his friend Fearless Jones and Paris Minton into picking up the case. Paris steps inside the world of the black bourgeoisie, and it turns out to be filled with deceit and corruption. It takes everything he has just to stay alive through a case filled with twists and turns and dead ends like he never imagined. Written with the voice and vision that have made Walter Mosley one of the most entertaining writers in America, Fear Itself marks the return of a master at the top of his form.
**

Paris Minton doesn?t want any trouble. He minds his used bookstore and his own business. But in 1950s Los Angeles, sometimes trouble finds him, no matter how hard he tries to avoid it. When the nephew of the wealthiest woman in L.A. is missing and wanted for murder, she has to get involved?no matter if she can?t stand him. What will her church think? She hires Jefferson T. Hill, a former sheriff of Dawson, Texas, and a tough customer, to track him down and prove his innocence. When Hill goes missing too, she tricks his friend Fearless Jones and Paris Minton into picking up the case. Paris steps inside the world of the black bourgeoisie, and it turns out to be filled with deceit and corruption. It takes everything he has just to stay alive through a case filled with twists and turns and dead ends like he never imagined. Written with the voice and vision that have made Walter Mosley one of the most entertaining writers in America, Fear Itself marks the return of a master at the top of his form.
**

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Faust I & II

Goethe’s most complex and profound work, *Faust* was the effort of the great poet’s entire lifetime. Written over a period of sixty years, it can be read as a document of Goethe’s moral and artistic development. As a drama drawn from an immense variety of cultural and historical material, set in a wealth of poetic and theatrical traditions, it can be read as the story of Western humanity striving restlessly and ruthlessly for progress.
*Faust* is made available to the English reader in a completely new translation that communicates both its poetic variety and its many levels of tone. The language is present-day English, and Goethe’s formal and rhythmic variety is reproduced in all its richness. With stylistic ease the translation conveys both the sense and the tonal range of the German original without recourse to archaisms or to interpretive elaborations. A short essay affords the reader an understanding of Goethe’s considerations as he composed the drama in the course of six decades, and the notes elucidate allusions that may be obscure to an English reader and indicate the significance of metrical features of the text.
This book is part of a projected twelve-volume paperback series that brings into modern English a reliable translation of a representative portion of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s vast body of work. Selected from over 140 volumes in German, this edition is the new standard in English and contains poetry, drama, fiction, memoir, criticism, and scientific writing. The twelve volumes are also available in hardcover, individually or as a set, through Princeton University Press.

Goethe’s most complex and profound work, *Faust* was the effort of the great poet’s entire lifetime. Written over a period of sixty years, it can be read as a document of Goethe’s moral and artistic development. As a drama drawn from an immense variety of cultural and historical material, set in a wealth of poetic and theatrical traditions, it can be read as the story of Western humanity striving restlessly and ruthlessly for progress.
*Faust* is made available to the English reader in a completely new translation that communicates both its poetic variety and its many levels of tone. The language is present-day English, and Goethe’s formal and rhythmic variety is reproduced in all its richness. With stylistic ease the translation conveys both the sense and the tonal range of the German original without recourse to archaisms or to interpretive elaborations. A short essay affords the reader an understanding of Goethe’s considerations as he composed the drama in the course of six decades, and the notes elucidate allusions that may be obscure to an English reader and indicate the significance of metrical features of the text.
This book is part of a projected twelve-volume paperback series that brings into modern English a reliable translation of a representative portion of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s vast body of work. Selected from over 140 volumes in German, this edition is the new standard in English and contains poetry, drama, fiction, memoir, criticism, and scientific writing. The twelve volumes are also available in hardcover, individually or as a set, through Princeton University Press.

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Fatelessness

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **One of *Publishers Weekly’s* Fifty Best Books of 1992***Fateless *is a moving and disturbing novel about a Hungarian Jewish boy’s experiences in German concentration camps and his attempts to reconcile himself to those experiences after the war. Upon his return to his native Budapest still clad in his striped prison clothes, fourteen-year-old George Koves senses the indifference, even hostility, of people on the street. His former neighbors and friends urge him to put the ordeal out of his mind, while a sympathetic journalist refers to the camps as “the lowest circle of hell.” The boy can relate to neither cliche and is left to ponder the meaning of his experience alone.George’s response to his experience is curiously ambivalent. In the camps he tries to adjust to his ever-worsening situation by imputing human motives to his inhumane captors. By imposing his logic–that of a bright, sensitive, though in many ways ordinary teenager – he maintains a precarious semblance of normalcy. Once freed, he must contend with the “banality of evil” to which he has become accustomed: when asked why he uses words like “naturally,” “undeniably,” and “without question” to describe the most horrendous of experiences, he responds, “In the concentration camp it was natural.” Without emotional or spiritual ties to his Jewish heritage and rejected by his country, he ultimately comes to the conclusion that neither his Hungarianness nor his Jewishness was really at the heart of his fate: rather, there are only “given situations, and within these, further givens.”

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **One of *Publishers Weekly’s* Fifty Best Books of 1992***Fateless *is a moving and disturbing novel about a Hungarian Jewish boy’s experiences in German concentration camps and his attempts to reconcile himself to those experiences after the war. Upon his return to his native Budapest still clad in his striped prison clothes, fourteen-year-old George Koves senses the indifference, even hostility, of people on the street. His former neighbors and friends urge him to put the ordeal out of his mind, while a sympathetic journalist refers to the camps as “the lowest circle of hell.” The boy can relate to neither cliche and is left to ponder the meaning of his experience alone.George’s response to his experience is curiously ambivalent. In the camps he tries to adjust to his ever-worsening situation by imputing human motives to his inhumane captors. By imposing his logic–that of a bright, sensitive, though in many ways ordinary teenager – he maintains a precarious semblance of normalcy. Once freed, he must contend with the “banality of evil” to which he has become accustomed: when asked why he uses words like “naturally,” “undeniably,” and “without question” to describe the most horrendous of experiences, he responds, “In the concentration camp it was natural.” Without emotional or spiritual ties to his Jewish heritage and rejected by his country, he ultimately comes to the conclusion that neither his Hungarianness nor his Jewishness was really at the heart of his fate: rather, there are only “given situations, and within these, further givens.”

Only registered users can download this free product.