23089–23104 di 72034 risultati

Understanding the NetScaler SDX: The Story Of How I Built My Own SDX Clone and How You Can Too

Engineer and NetScaler Expert, JOSEPH MOSES documents his journey in building his own NetScaler SDX “clone” from commodity computer parts. Deep diving into the MPX-to-SDX upgrade process, Joseph describes how the SDX works so that he could build his own “SDX clone”. Also discussed are the hardware and software tools used in this process and a discussion on what other hardware combinations might be (and can not be) used to build your own “SDX clone”.
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Understanding Ecmascript 6

ECMAScript 6 represents the biggest change to the core of JavaScript in the history of the language. Not all JavaScript environments support ECMAScript 6 yet, but you can get ahead of the game by learning what’s coming and which features are available already.
Understanding ECMAScript 6 is a complete guide to the new object types, syntax, and other exciting capabilities ECMAScript 6 brings to JavaScript, written by expert developer Nicholas C. Zakas. Every chapter is packed with example code that works in any JavaScript environment, which you can run to see new features in action. You’ll learn:

* All of the changes to JavaScript since ECMAScript 5
* How ECMAScript 6 class syntax relates to more familiar JavaScript concepts
* Why iterators and generators are useful
* How arrow functions differ from regular functions
* Additional options for storing data with sets, maps, and more
* The power of inheriting from native types
* Why people are excited about promises for asynchronous programming
* How modules will change the way you organize code

For a glimpse farther into the future of JavaScript, Zakas even discusses the small changes to watch for in ECMAScript 7 (2016). Whether you’re a web developer or a Node.js developer, you’ll find Understanding ECMAScript 6 indispensable on your journey from ECMAScript 5 to ECMAScript 6.
Covers ECMAScript 6 and 7(2016)
(source: Bol.com)

Understanding Context: Environment, Language, and Information Architecture

Understanding Context: Environment, Language, and Information Architecture by Andrew Hinton
To make sense of the world, we’re always trying to place things in context, whether our environment is physical, cultural, or something else altogether. Now that we live among digital, always-networked products, apps, and places, context is more complicated than ever—starting with “where” and “who” we are.
This practical, insightful book provides a powerful toolset to help information architects, UX professionals, and web and app designers understand and solve the many challenges of contextual ambiguity in the products and services they create. You’ll discover not only how to design for a given context, but also how design participates in *making* context.
* Learn how people perceive context when touching and navigating digital environments
* See how labels, relationships, and rules work as building blocks for context
* Find out how to make better sense of cross-channel, multi-device products or services
* Discover how language creates infrastructure in organizations, software, and the Internet of Things
* Learn models for figuring out the contextual angles of any user experience

Understanding Bitcoin

Discover Bitcoin, the cryptocurrency that has the finance world buzzing Bitcoin is arguably one of the biggest developments in finance since the advent of fiat currency. With Understanding Bitcoin, expert author Pedro Franco provides finance professionals with a complete technical guide and resource to the cryptography, engineering and economic development of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. This comprehensive, yet accessible work fully explores the supporting economic realities and technological advances of Bitcoin, and presents positive and negative arguments from various economic schools regarding its continued viability. This authoritative text provides a step-by-step description of how Bitcoin works, starting with public key cryptography and moving on to explain transaction processing, the blockchain and mining technologies. This vital resource reviews Bitcoin from the broader perspective of digital currencies and explores historical attempts at cryptographic currencies. Bitcoin is, after all, not just a digital currency; it’s a modern approach to the secure transfer of value using cryptography. This book is a detailed guide to what it is, how it works, and how it just may jumpstart a change in the way digital value changes hands. * Understand how Bitcoin works, and the technology behind it * Delve into the economics of Bitcoin, and its impact on the financial industry * Discover alt-coins and other available cryptocurrencies * Explore the ideas behind Bitcoin 2.0 technologies * Learn transaction protocols, micropayment channels, atomic cross-chain trading, and more Bitcoin challenges the basic assumption under which the current financial system rests: that currencies are issued by central governments, and their supply is managed by central banks. To fully understand this revolutionary technology, Understanding Bitcoin is a uniquely complete, reader-friendly guide.
(source: Bol.com)

Underneath It All: A History of Women’s Underwear

For most of human history, the garments women wore under their clothes were hidden. The earliest underwear provided warmth and protection. But eventually, women’s undergarments became complex structures designed to shape their bodies to fit the fashion ideals of the time.
In the modern era, undergarments are out in the open, from the designer corsets Madonna wore on stage to Beyoncé’s pregnancy announcement on Instagram. This feminist exploration of women’s underwear reveals the intimate role lingerie plays in defining women’s bodies, sexuality, gender identity, and body image. It is a story of control and restraint but also female empowerment and self-expression. You will never look at underwear the same way again.
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### Sinossi
For most of human history, the garments women wore under their clothes were hidden. The earliest underwear provided warmth and protection. But eventually, women’s undergarments became complex structures designed to shape their bodies to fit the fashion ideals of the time.
In the modern era, undergarments are out in the open, from the designer corsets Madonna wore on stage to Beyoncé’s pregnancy announcement on Instagram. This feminist exploration of women’s underwear reveals the intimate role lingerie plays in defining women’s bodies, sexuality, gender identity, and body image. It is a story of control and restraint but also female empowerment and self-expression. You will never look at underwear the same way again.

The Underground Railroad

Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. All the slaves lead a hellish existence, but Cora has it worse than most; she is an outcast even among her fellow Africans and is approaching womanhood, where it is clear even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a slave recently arrived from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they take the perilous decision to escape to the North.

Winner of the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.
From prize-winning, bestselling author Colson Whitehead, a magnificent tour de force chronicling a young slave’s adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South
Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves, but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.
In Whitehead s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Cora and Caesar s first stop is South Carolina, in a city that initially seems like a haven. But the city s placid surface masks an insidious scheme designed for its black denizens. And even worse: Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. Forced to flee again, Cora embarks on a harrowing flight, state by state, seeking true freedom.
Like the protagonist of ”Gulliver s Travels, ” Cora encounters different worlds at each stage of her journey hers is an odyssey through time as well as space. As Whitehead brilliantly re-creates the unique terrors for black people in the pre Civil War era, his narrative seamlessly weaves the saga of America from the brutal importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the present day. ”The Underground Railroad” is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.”
**Recensie(s)**

Hard-driving, laser-sharp, artistically superlative, and deeply compassionate, Whitehead’s unforgettable odyssey adds a clarion new facet to the literature of racial tyranny and liberation * Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence, shortlist announcement * Colson Whitehead’s staggering, haunted new novel . . . [is] a book that is fully expected to win all the awards this year – Pulitzer Prize, Booker Prize, National Book Award, etc – and it deserves every last one * Chapter 16 * In powerful, precise prose, at once spellbinding and ferocious, the book follows Cora’s incredible journey north, step by step . . . the story is literature at its finest and history at its most barbaric. Would that this novel were required reading for every American citizen * Publishers Weekly * Startlingly original . . . Whitehead continues the African-American artists’ inquiry into race mythology and history with rousing authority and razor-sharp ingenuity; he is now assuredly a writer of the first rank * Kirkus * Magnetizing and wrenching . . . Each stop Cora makes along the Underground Railroad reveals another shocking and malignant symptom of a country riven by catastrophic conflicts, a poisonous moral crisis, and diabolical violence. Each galvanizing scene blazes with terror and indictment as Whitehead tracks the consequences of the old American imperative to seize, enslave, and profit . . . Hard-driving, lasersharp, artistically superlative, and deeply compassionate, Whitehead’s unforgettable odyssey adds a clarion new facet to the literature of racial tyranny and liberation * Booklist * Whitehead is a fantastic novelist, one of the best in America today. (Certainly better than Franzen.)… Oprah is right: The Underground Railroad is Whitehead’s best book yet… This is the rare critically acclaimed bestseller that deserves every ounce of its adoration, and more. The hype is real. You can believe Oprah, and its scores of other fans, including some guy who took The Underground Railroad on summer vacation and can’t stop talking about its terrific… powerful portraiture of race in America. That fan’s name is Barack Obama * Seattle Times * The Underground Railroad has serious ambition, especially within the tradition of literary satire . . . With deadpan virtuosity and muted audacity, Whitehead integrates the historical details of slavery with the present * Los Angeles Review of Books * Masterful, urgent . . . one of the finest novels written about our country’s still unabsolved original sin — Charles Finch * USA Today * This book should be required reading in classrooms across the country alongside Huckleberry Finn and To Kill a Mockingbird. If this isn’t Colson Whitehead’s masterpiece, it’s definitely the best book of the year and maybe the most important work of the decade * Chicago Tribune * [The Underground Railroad] is really good – good, in fact, in just about every way a novel can be good . . . a grave and fully realized masterpiece, a weird blend of history and fantasy that will have critics rightfully making comparisons to Toni Morrison and Gabriel Garcia-Marquez * Boston Globe * A book that resonates with deep emotional timbre. The Underground Railroad reanimates the slave narrative, disrupts our settled sense of the past and stretches the ligaments of history right into our own era . . . The story charges along with incredible power . . . The canon of essential novels about America’s peculiar institution just grew by one — Ron Charles * Washington Post * The Underground Railroad isn’t the modern slave narrative it first appears to be. It is something grander and more piercing, a dazzling antebellum anti-myth…Whitehead’s prose is quick as a runaway’s footsteps * New York Review of Books * Leaves the reader with a devastating understanding of the terrible human costs of slavery . . . with echoes of Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables and Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, and with brush strokes borrowed from Jorge Luis Borges, Franz Kafka and Jonathan Swift . . . Colson Whitehead has told a story essential to our understanding of the American past and the American present — Michiko Kakutani * New York Times * A charged and important novel that pushed at the boundaries of fiction — Justine Jordan * Guardian, Best Books of 2016 * Stunning and unsentimental . . . required reading — Jenny Niven * Herald * An audaciously imagined and profoundly moving novel — Eithne Farry * Express * The Underground Railroad is a noble descendant of the great narratives of slavery, and among the very finest of its novels — Wesley Stace * Times Literary Supplement * Thrilling and unsentimental * Scotsman * A fantastical picaresque through the dark side of American history * Daily Telegraph * I stayed up way too late to finish this… It will be haunting me in the best way * Celeste Ng, author of Everything I Never Told You * An enchanting tale . . . full of vivid images, learned allusions and astute observations . . . The most important and acclaimed American novel of the past year * London Review of Books * Brutal, tender, thrilling and audacious — Naomi Alderman * Guardian * It is a bold way of reimagining the slave experience and, in the capable hands of Whitehead, succeeds triumphantly * Mail on Sunday * Inventive and hard-hitting * Metro * This bravura novel reimagines that same network as a real subterranean railway, upon which a girl named Cora flees the slave-catcher Ridgeway. Throughout, horrific experiences are rendered in lapidary prose, but it’s Cora’s daring that provides the story’s redemptive oomph * Mail on Sunday * Reaches the marrow of your bones, settles in and stays forever . . . a tour de force — Oprah Winfrey Recommended by none other than Obama AND Oprah, The Underground Railroad arrives deserving every last drop of hype that’s come its way . . . There are many twists and turns in Cora’s long, treacherous journey towards freedom and while The Underground Railroad is at times brutal and disturbing, it’s also hopeful and an addictive, compulsive read. After reading it, a corner of your heart will always belong to Cora. An instant classic — Sarra Manning * Red * A stunning, brutal and hugely imaginative book. It’s a favourite of both Oprah Winfrey and Barack Obama. It is painful history re-imagined in a powerful and brilliant way * Emerald St * Bestselling author Colson Whitehead’s novel is a searing indictment of slavery with a detailed inventory of man’s inhumanity to man – and Cora’s flight is a harrowing and shocking trip for the reader * Daily Mail * An utterly transporting piece of storytelling — Alex Heminsley * The Pool * It is an extraordinary novel, a rich, confident work that will deservedly win – on the basis of literary merit as well as moral purpose . . . History and human experience as well as an artist’s obligation to tell the truth have shaped a virtuoso novel that should be read by every American as well as readers across the world. And it will be, it should be — Eileen Battersby * Irish Times * Whitehead is a superb storyteller . . . [he] brilliantly intertwines his allegory with history . . . writing at the peak of his game . . . Whitehead’s achievement is truly remarkable: by giving the Underground Railroad a new mythology, he has found a way of confronting other myths, older and persistent, about the United States. His book cannot have enough readers * Telegraph * My book of the year by some distance…It’s a profound and important novel, but more than anything it’s an absurdly good read, gripping you in its tightly wound plot, astonishing you with its leaps of imagination. If Whitehead doesn’t win every prize going next year, I’ll appear on Saturday Review in my underpants — Alex Preston * Observer, Best Fiction of 2016 * One of the best, if not the best, book I’ve read this year . . . Whitehead never exploits his subject matter, and in fact it’s the sparseness of the novel that makes it such a punch in the gut — Sarah Shaffi * Stylist * It’s so good it’s hard to praise it without whipping out the cliches: it’s an elegant, devastating powerhouse of a book, following a young black woman all over America as she tries to escape the horrors of slavery. When it was published with Oprah’s imprimatur, in August, it was universally acclaimed. It deserved it — Michelle Dean * Guardian * This thrilling tale of escape from a deep south plantation takes in terror, beauty and the history of human tragedy..This uncanny novel never attempts to deliver a message – instead it tells one of the most compelling stories I have ever read. Cora’s strong, graceful hands touch on the greatest tragedies of our history * Cynthia Bond, Guardian * [A] brutal, vital, devastating novel…This is a luminous, furious, wildly inventive tale that not only shines a bright light on one of the darkest periods of history, but also opens up thrilling new vistas for the form of the novel itself — Alex Preston * Observer * An engrossing and harrowing novel * Sunday Times * It has invaded both my sleeping and waking thoughts . . . Each character feels alive with a singular humanity . . . Whitehead is on a roll, the reviews have been sublime — Bim Adewunmi * Guardian *
(source: Bol.com)

Underground Guardians Box Set

About Protector:
Mason Alexander is the leader of the elite Black Knights, a special forces unit that have all been genetically enhanced. He must lead his team to stop a rogue group of Knights lead by his brother. Holly Hart, a beautiful doctor who has devoted her life to genetic research, is the woman who can help achieve his goal of capturing his brother. Dark danger and hot passion will bring them together, but will Mason’s secrets, drive them apart, before love can save them?
About Healer:
The genetically enhanced elite Special Forces Unit The Black Knights continues to battle to save the world from a rogue group of their own men who wish to rule the world. Marcella Alexander, a woman considered myth by most, is named the Witch Doctor for her unique healing powers that the enemy wishes to use for evil. Diego, doctor of the Knights, is enlisted to find Marcella and bring her to safety before she can be captured. Marcella doesn’t know who to trust and she will not go with Diego freely. Diego will have to become her captor to save her life, and now, on the run through a danger infested territory inside Mexico, they will find both obstacles, and burning hot passion. But Diego must earn more than Marcella’s passion. He must earn her heart and her trust, and do so quickly if he is to save her from a madman who is determined to possess her himself.

Underground

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It was a clear spring day, Monday, March 20, 1995, when five members of the religious cult Aum Shinrikyo conducted chemical warfare on the Tokyo subway system using sarin, a poison gas twenty-six times as deadly as cyanide. The unthinkable had happened, a major urban transit system had become the target of a terrorist attack.

In an attempt to discover why, Haruki Murakami, internationally acclaimed author of *The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle *and arguably Japan’s most important contemporary novelist, talked to the people who lived through the catastrophe—from a Subway Authority employee with survivor guilt, to a fashion salesman with more venom for the media than for the perpetrators, to a young cult member who vehemently condemns the attack though he has not quit Aum. Through these and many other voices, Murakami exposes intriguing aspects of the Japanese psyche. And as he discerns the fundamental issues leading to the attack, we achieve a clear vision of an event that could occur anytime, anywhere. Hauntingly compelling and inescapably important, *Underground* is a powerful work of journalistic literature from one of the world’s most perceptive writers.

Underground

From Publishers Weekly

On March 20, 1995, followers of the religious cult Aum Shinrikyo unleashed lethal sarin gas into cars of the Tokyo subway system. Many died, many more were injured. This is acclaimed Japanese novelist Murakami’s (The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, etc.) nonfiction account of this episode. It is riveting. What he mostly does here, however, is listen to and record, in separate sections, the words of both victims, people who “just happened to be gassed on the way to work,” and attackers. The victims are ordinary people bankers, businessmen, office workers, subway workers who reflect upon what happened to them, how they reacted at the time and how they have lived since. Some continue to suffer great physical disabilities, nearly all still suffer great psychic trauma. There is a Rashomon-like quality to some of the tales, as victims recount the same episodes in slightly different variations. Cumulatively, their tales fascinate, as small details weave together to create a complex narrative. The attackers are of less interest, for what they say is often similar, and most remain, or at least do not regret having been, members of Aum. As with the work of Studs Terkel, which Murakami acknowledges is a model for this present work, the author’s voice, outside of a few prefatory comments, is seldom heard. He offers no grand explanation, no existential answer to what happened, and the book is better for it. This is, then, a compelling tale of how capriciously and easily tragedy can destroy the ordinary, and how we try to make sense of it all. (May 1)Forecast: Publication coincides with the release of a new novel by Murakami (Sputnik Sweetheart, Forecasts, Mar. 19), and several national magazines, including Newsweek and GQ, will be featuring this fine writer. This attention should help Murakami’s growing literary reputation.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The deadly Tokyo subway poison gas attack, perpetrated by members of the Aum Shinrikyo cult on March 20, 1995, was the fulfillment of every urban straphanger’s nightmare. Through interviews with several dozen survivors and former members of Aum, novelist Murakami (The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle) presents an utterly compelling work of reportage that lays bare the soul of contemporary Japan in all its contradictions. The sarin attack exposed Tokyo authorities’ total lack of preparation to cope with such fiendish urban terrorism. More interesting, however, is the variety of reactions among the survivors, a cross-section of Japanese citizens. Their individual voices remind us of the great diversity within what is too often viewed from afar as a homogeneous society. What binds most of them is their curious lack of anger at Aum. Chilling, too, is the realization that so many Aum members were intelligent, well-educated persons who tried to fill voids in their lives by following Shoko Asahara, a mad guru who promised salvation through total subordination to his will. For all public and academic libraries. Steven I. Levine, Univ. of Montana, Missoula
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Undercity

BOOK ONE IN A BRAND NEW SERIES by Nebula and Hugo Award Winner Catherine Asaro set in the world of her Skolian Empire universe.

Major Bhaajan, a former military officer with Imperial Space Command, is now a hard-bitten P.I. with a load of baggage to deal with, and clients with woes sometimes personal, sometimes galaxy-shattering, and sometimes both. Bhaajan must sift through the shadows of dark and dangerous Undercity—the enormous capital of a vast star empire—to find answers.

At the publisher’s request, this title is sold without DRM (Digital Rights Management).

About Catherine Asaro’s Skolian saga:
“Entertaining mix of hard SF and romance.”—*Publishers Weekly*

“Asaro’s Skolian saga is now nearly as long and in many ways as compelling as Dune, if not more so, featuring a multitude of stronger female characters.”—*Booklist*

“Rapid pacing and gripping suspense.”—*Publisher’s Weekly*
(source: Bol.com)

Under Western Eyes

“It was I who removed de P- this morning.” With these chilling words Victor Haldin shatters the solitary, industrious existence of Razumov, his fellow student at St Petersburg University. Razumov aims to overcome the denial of his noble birth by a brilliant career in the tsarist bureaucracy created by Peter the Great. But in pre-revolutionary Russia Peter’s legacy is autocracy tempered by assassination; and Razumov is soon caught in a tragic web with Haldin’s trustful sister Natalia in spy-haunted Geneva. Their fateful story is told by an elderly Englishman who loves Natalia but plays his part of a ‘dense Westerner’ to the end. The central character, Razumov, is the most dislikable anti-hero in all fiction, so it’s an amazing feat of empathy by which Conrad brings us to care about his fate. Conrad’s genius as a narrator is his ability to place himself and the reader in a realm of detachment, so that every event and every character can be observed from several angles at once. The “unreliable narrator” is child’s play for Conrad. The Russia portrayed in “Under Western Eyes” is a land of cynicism and naivete intertwined – hyper-emotionalism and psychological repression in equal measure – omni-competent surveillance and hopeless myopia – ruthless bureaucracy and utter disorganization – a land in short of oxymoronic self-destruction. This is NOT, however, the Russia of Communism! The novel was written in 1911! This is Russia as it existed under the Tsarist autocracy, and everything about it clamors for revolution. It’s interesting to compare Conrad’s portrayal of the old regime with the nostalgic and idealized version served up by Vladimir Nabokov in his memoir “Speak, Memory.” Nabokov wrote far more beautiful sentences, but Conrad saw deeper. The horror for post-Stalinist readers, in Conrad’s depiction of the pre-revolutionary state-of-things is that we KNOW that change will not change much, that autocratic, arbitrary repression will be replaced by…more of the same. Conrad wrote two novels aground, away from the sea – this one and The Secret Agent. They are among his best. Under Western Eyes is a book to be read slowly and observantly; the effort will be rewarded.
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Under Twilight

**Nothing ever truly dies…**
With the throne finally in her power, Kenna Carter should be able to relax. But with the threat of a Twilight invasion looming and the fate of her people, both djinn and human, at stake, there are several tough decisions to be made. It doesn’t help that her Fearless instincts contradict her monarch duties at every turn, throwing her into the path of danger again and again. When the threat they’re facing turns out to be much bigger than they could ever have imagined, Kenna is faced with her biggest challenge yet. A challenge that may end up being her last.
**An urban fantasy saturated with adrenaline pumping action, core melting romance, and all the feels.**

Under the Dome

On an entirely normal, beautiful fall day in Chester’s Mill, Maine, the town is inexplicably and suddenly sealed off from the rest of the world by an invisible force field. Planes crash into it and fall from the sky in flaming wreckage, a gardener’s hand is severed as “the dome” comes down on it, people running errands in the neighboring town are divided from their families, and cars explode on impact. No one can fathom what this barrier is, where it came from, and when — or if — it will go away.

Dale Barbara, Iraq vet and now a short-order cook, finds himself teamed with a few intrepid citizens — town newspaper owner Julia Shumway, a physician’s assistant at the hospital, a select-woman, and three brave kids. Against them stands Big Jim Rennie, a politician who will stop at nothing — even murder — to hold the reins of power, and his son, who is keeping a horrible secret in a dark pantry. But their main adversary is the Dome itself. Because time isn’t just short. It’s running out.
**Recensie(s)**

Dome is classic King, sure to please any fan. — Baltimore Sun Under the Dome moves so fast and grips the reader so tightly that it’s practically incapacitating. — Newsday Spellbinding. — ABCnews.com Stephen King’s Under the Dome was one of my favourite books of the year so far. — Neil Gaiman A wildly entertaining trip. — People (3.5 stars) King returns to his glory days of The Stand . — New York Daily News King returns to his glory days of The Stand. — New York Daily News -Spellbinding.- — ABCnews.com -Dome is classic King, sure to please any fan.- — Baltimore Sun -Stephen King’s Under the Dome was one of my favourite books of the year so far.- — Neil Gaiman -Under the Dome moves so fast and grips the reader so tightly that it’s practically incapacitating.- — Newsday -A wildly entertaining trip.- — People (3.5 stars) -King returns to his glory days of The Stand.- — New York Daily News -The work of a master storyteller having a whole lot of fun.- — Los Angeles Times -Tight and energetic from start to finish… Hard as this thing is to hoist, it’s even harder to put down.- — New York Times -Propulsively intriguing… Staggeringly addictive.- — USA Today Dome is classic King, sure to please any fan. — Baltimore Sun Stephen King’s Under the Dome was one of my favourite books of the year so far. — Neil Gaiman Under the Dome moves so fast and grips the reader so tightly that it’s practically incapacitating. — Newsday A wildly entertaining trip. — People (3.5 stars) King returns to his glory days of The Stand. — New York Daily News The work of a master storyteller having a whole lot of fun. — Los Angeles Times Tight and energetic from start to finish… Hard as this thing is to hoist, it’s even harder to put down. — New York Times Propulsively intriguing… Staggeringly addictive. — USA Today
(source: Bol.com)

Under the banner of heaven: a story of violent faith

SUMMARY: Jon Krakauer’s literary reputation rests on insightful chronicles of lives conducted at the outer limits. He now shifts his focus from extremes of physical adventure to extremes of religious belief within our own borders, taking readers inside isolated American communities where some 40,000 Mormon Fundamentalists still practice polygamy. Defying both civil authorities and the Mormon establishment in Salt Lake City, the renegade leaders of these Taliban-like theocracies are zealots who answer only to God.At the core of Krakauer’s book are brothers Ron and Dan Lafferty, who insist they received a commandment from God to kill a blameless woman and her baby girl. Beginning with a meticulously researched account of this appalling double murder, Krakauer constructs a multi-layered, bone-chilling narrative of messianic delusion, polygamy, savage violence, and unyielding faith. Along the way he uncovers a shadowy offshoot of America’s fastest growing religion, and raises provocative questions about the nature of religious belief.

Under Fire

On a routine intelligence gathering mission in Tehran, Jack Ryan, Jr., has lunch with his oldest friend, Seth Gregory, an engineer overseeing a transcontinental railway project. As they part, Seth slips Jack a key, along with a perplexing message.
The next day Jack is summoned to an apartment where two men claim Seth has disappeared—gone to ground with funds for a vital intelligence operation.  Jack’s oldest friend has turned, they insist.
They leave Jack with a warning:  If you hear from Seth Gregory, call us immediately. And do not get involved.
But they don’t know Jack. He won’t abandon a friend in need. 
His pursuit of the truth will lead him across Iran, through the war-torn Caucasus, and finally deep into territory coveted by the increasingly aggressive Russian Federation. Along the way, Jack is joined by Seth’s primary agent, Ysabel, a enigmatic Iranian woman who seems to be his only clue to Seth’s whereabouts. 
Jack soon finds himself lost in a maze of intrigue, lies, and betrayal where no one is who they seem to be—not even Seth, who’s harboring a secret of his own that harkens back to the Cold War. A secret that is driving him to the brink of treachery.
Racing against the clock, Jack must unravel the mystery: Who is friend and who is foe? Before it’s over, Jack Ryan, Jr., may have to choose between his loyalty to Seth and his loyalty to America.

Under Cover of the Night

It was planned to look like a suicide.
But even in the best-laid plans, evidence is left behind…

Jocelyn Branham Earnest was found dead on the floor of her living room in Forest, Virginia. By her side was a gun and a suicide note—typed, lacking a signature, and with one fingerprint on it. A fingerprint apparently belonging to Jocelyn’s estranged husband…

Wesley Earnest was a respected high school administrator, poised to restart his life in a new community. Parents entrusted their children to his care and believed he was above reproach. But the investigation into the life the couple once shared would reveal adultery, troubled finances, and shattered dreams—enough for one man with murder on his mind to travel hundreds of miles…

Under Cover of the Night

INCLUDES PHOTOS

(source: Bol.com)