19809–19824 di 66541 risultati

Imagine: How Creativity Works

Did you know that the most creative companies have centralized bathrooms? That brainstorming meetings are a terrible idea? That the color blue can help you double your creative output?
From the *New York Times *best-selling author of *How We Decide* comes a sparkling and revelatory look at the new science of creativity. Shattering the myth of muses, higher powers, even creative “types,” Jonah Lehrer demonstrates that creativity is not a single gift possessed by the lucky few. It’s a variety of distinct thought processes that we can all learn to use more effectively.
Lehrer reveals the importance of embracing the rut, thinking like a child, daydreaming productively, and adopting an outsider’s perspective (travel helps). He unveils the optimal mix of old and new partners in any creative collaboration, and explains why criticism is essential to the process. Then he zooms out to show how we can make our neighborhoods more vibrant, our companies more productive, and our schools more effective.
You’ll learn about Bob Dylan’s writing habits and the drug addictions of poets. You’ll meet a Manhattan bartender who thinks like a chemist, and an autistic surfer who invented an entirely new surfing move. You’ll see why Elizabethan England experienced a creative explosion, and how Pixar’s office space is designed to spark the next big leap in animation.
Collapsing the layers separating the neuron from the finished symphony, *Imagine *reveals the deep inventiveness of the human mind, and its essential role in our increasingly complex world.
[http://www.jonahlehrer.com/](http://www.jonahlehrer.com/)

Im Land Der Letzten Dinge

A Journey in a post-apocolyptic urban street setting, possibly New York, where protagonist Anna Blume is searching for her brother, William.

Ilse Witch

A new novel by Terry Brooks is always a cause for celebration. For more than twenty years, the” New York Times” bestselling author of the classic Shannara epic has proven himself one of the modernmasters of fantasy, winning the hearts and minds of devoted readers around the world. In his last acclaimed novel, “Ilse” “Witch,” a brave company of explorers led by the last Druid, Walker Boh, traveled across unknown seas in search of an elusive magic. Yet perhaps Boh and his team were lured there for sinister, unforeseen purposes . . .
Now in “Antrax,” as the crewaboard the airship “Jerle Shannara” is attacked by evil forces, the Druid’s proteeacute;ge Bek Rowe and his companions are pursued by the mysterious Ilse Witch. Meanwhile, Boh isalone, caught in a dark maze beneath the ruined city of Castledown, stalked by a hungry, unseen enemy.
For there is something alive in Castledown. Something not human. Something old beyond reckoningthat covets the magic of Druids, elves, even the Ilse Witch. Something that hunts men for its own designs: Antrax. It is a spirit that commands ancient technologies and mechanical monsters, feeds off enchantment, and trapsthe souls of men.
With the “Jerle Shannara” under siege and Antrax threatening the bold and unwary, the Ilse Witch finds herself face-to-face with a boy who claims to be the brother shelast saw as an infant. Now a young man, Bek wields the magic of the wishsong and carries the Sword of Shannara upon his back. Unsure whether to trust Bek or to slay him, the Ilse Witch takes him prisoner. One has comepursuing truth, the other revenge. Yet both seek Walker Boh-with the fate of the Four Lands hanging in the balance.
Return to the world of beloved novelist Terry Brooks, where creatures driftup from the earth like mist, a hypnotic song can kill, a sword can cut through a veil of lies-and one man, the true heir of an ancient magic, must choose between betrayal and redemption.

Illustrated Theory of Everything: The Origin and Fate of the Universe

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Stephen Hawking is widely believed to be one of the world’s greatest minds, a brilliant theoretical physicist whose work helped reconfigure models of the universe and define what’s in it. Imagine sitting in a room listening to Hawking discuss these achievements and place them in historical context; it would be like hearing Christopher Columbus on the New World. Hawking presents a series of seven lectures—covering everything from big bang to black holes to string theory—that capture not only the brilliance of Hawking’s mind but his characteristic wit as well. Of his research on black holes, which absorbed him for more than a decade, he says, “It might seem a bit like looking for a black cat in a coal cellar.” Hawking begins with a history of ideas about the universe, from Aristotle’s determination that the Earth is round to Hubble’s discovery, more than 2,000 years later, that the universe is expanding. Using that as a launching pad, he explores the reaches of modern physics, including theories on the origin of the universe (e.g., the Big Bang), the nature of black holes, and space-time. Finally, he poses the questions left unanswered by modern physics, especially how to combine all the partial theories into a “unified theory of everything.” “If we find the answer to that,” he claims, “it would be the ultimate triumph of human reason.” A great popularizer of science as well as a brilliant scientist, Hawking believes that advances in theoretical science should be “understandable in broad principle by everyone, not just a few scientists.” In this book, he offers a fascinating voyage of discovery about the cosmos and our place in it. It is a book for anyone who has ever gazed at the night sky and wondered what was up there and how it came to be.

The Illustrated Man

That *The Illustrated Man* has remained in print since being published in 1951 is fair testimony to the universal appeal of Ray Bradbury’s work. Only his second collection (the first was *Dark Carnival*, later reworked into *The October Country*), it is a marvelous, if mostly dark, quilt of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. In an ingenious framework to open and close the book, Bradbury presents himself as a nameless narrator who meets the Illustrated Man–a wanderer whose entire body is a living canvas of exotic tattoos. What’s even more remarkable, and increasingly disturbing, is that the illustrations are themselves magically alive, and each proceeds to unfold its own story, such as “The Veldt,” wherein rowdy children take a game of virtual reality way over the edge. Or “Kaleidoscope,” a heartbreaking portrait of stranded astronauts about to reenter our atmosphere–without the benefit of a spaceship. Or “Zero Hour,” in which invading aliens have discovered a most logical ally–our own children. Even though most were written in the 1940s and 1950s, these 18 classic stories will be just as chillingly effective 50 years from now. *–Stanley Wiater*
Contents:
· Prologue: The Illustrated Man · ss *
· The Veldt [“The World the Children Made”] · ss The Saturday Evening Post Sep 23 ’50
· Kaleidoscope · ss Thrilling Wonder Stories Oct ’49
· The Other Foot · ss New Story Magazine Mar ’51
· The Highway [as by Leonard Spalding] · ss Copy Spr ’50
· The Man · ss Thrilling Wonder Stories Feb ’49
· The Long Rain [“Death-by-Rain”] · ss Planet Stories Sum ’50
· The Rocket Man · ss Maclean’s Mar 1 ’51
· The Fire Balloons [“‘In This Sign…’”] · ss Imagination Apr ’51
· The Last Night of the World · ss Esquire Feb ’51
· The Exiles [“The Mad Wizards of Mars”] · ss Maclean’s Sep 15 ’49; F&SF Win ’50
· No Particular Night or Morning · ss *
· The Fox and the Forest [“To the Future”] · ss Colliers May 13 ’50
· The Visitor · ss Startling Stories Nov ’48
· The Concrete Mixer · ss Thrilling Wonder Stories Apr ’49
· Marionettes, Inc. [Marionettes, Inc.] · ss Startling Stories Mar ’49
· The City [“Purpose”] · ss Startling Stories Jul ’50
· Zero Hour · ss Planet Stories Fll ’47
· The Rocket [“Outcast of the Stars”] · ss Super Science Stories Mar ’50
· Epilogue · aw *

The Illustrated Gormenghast Trilogy

‘Peake’s books are actual additions to life; they give, like certain rare dreams, sensations we never had before, and enlarge our conception of the range of possible experience’ C.S. Lewis Enter the world of Gormenghast. The vast crumbling castle to which the seventy-seventh Earl, Titus Groan, is Lord and heir. Titus is expected to rule this Gothic labyrinth of turrets and dungeons, cloisters and corridors as well as the eccentric and wayward subject. Things are changing in the castle and Titus must contend with a kingdom about to implode beneath the weight of centuries of intrigue, treachery, manipulation and murder.
**Recensie(s)**

His novels, said Burgess, are ‘aggressively three-dimensional… showing the poet as well as the draughtsman.. It is difficult in post-war English fiction to get away with big rhetorical gestures. Peake manages it because, with him, grandiloquence never means diffuseness’ there is no musical emptiness in the most romantic of his descriptions. He is always exact.. . [Titus Groan] remains essentially a work of the closed imagination, in which a world parallel to our own is presented in almost paranoiac denseness of detail. But the madness is illusory, and control never falters. It is, if you like, a rich wine of fancy chilled by the intellect to just the right temperature. There is no really close relative to it in all our prose literature. It is uniquely brilliant.’ * Anthony Burgess * Dark, dense, baroque and hauntingly beautiful. Peake’s lush prose and imagery are a pleasure to any lover of the beauty of the written word. A word of warning, however: this one takes its time. Most readers are used to more watery offerings – this is thick, creamy and extra-rich — Carlos Ruiz-Zafron * Guardian * A master of the macabre and a traveller through the deeper and darker chasms of the imagination * The Times * I discovered it at 15 and have been rediscovering it ever since. It’s a profoundly enchanting world, but there are no elves or spells the magic is purely in the writing * Joanne Harris * I started reading it and did not stop.The images conjured up the most weird visions. Images that I had not encountered since absorbing my first introduction to the world of William Blake. It is a fantastic, almost surrealistic flow of vision — Ronald Searle
(source: Bol.com)

Ilium

The Trojan War rages at the foot of Olympos Mons on Mars — observed and influenced from on high by Zeus and his immortal family — and twenty-first-century professor Thomas Hockenberry is there to play a role in the insidious private wars of vengeful gods and goddesses. On Earth, a small band of the few remaining humans pursues a lost past and devastating truth — as four sentient machines depart from Jovian space to investigate, perhaps terminate, the potentially catastrophic emissions emanating from a mountaintop miles above the terraformed surface of the Red Planet.
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Il Troppo È Del Malvagio

E’ la storia di Dante, un giovane e timido studente che per amore di una ragazza si affida alla magia. Un banale errore cambierà per sempre la sua vita e quella dei suoi amici dando inizio a una serie di problemi che i giovani, uniti, cercheranno di sistemare.

If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler

Italo Calvino’s masterpiece combines a love story and a detective story into an exhilarating allegory of reading, in which the reader of the book becomes the book’s central character.
Based on a witty analogy between the reader’s desire to finish the story and the lover’s desire to consummate his or her passion, If On A Winter’s Night A Traveller is the tale of two bemused readers whose attempts to reach the end of the same book, If On A Winter’s Night A Traveller by Italo Calvino, of course, are constantly and comically frustrated. In between chasing missing chapters of the book, the hapless readers tangle with an international conspiracy, a rogue translator, an elusive novelist, a disintegrating publishing house, and several oppressive governments. The result is a literary labyrinth of storylines that interrupt one another – an Arabian Nights of the postmodern age.

If It Flies

*If it flies, drives, or fornicates, it’s cheaper to rent it.*
Spencer is in a rut. Long hours at the law firm are sucking the life out of him, and he doesn’t have time or energy for a relationship. He’s lonely, horny, and itching for something new, so he tries the Market Garden, an exclusive – and expensive – brothel. Spencer isn’t in the door five minutes before a cocky rentboy makes his move.
Nick isn’t just any rentboy, though. He’s a Dom, he’s a sadist, and he’s everything Spencer didn’t know he was missing. One night turns into more, and before long, Spencer is one of Nick’s regular clients.
Both men think they’re just scratching each other’s backs: Spencer’s exploring a submissive, masochistic side he never knew he had, and Nick is getting off and getting paid. But as time goes on, it’s clear their strictly professional arrangement … isn’t, and if Nick has one hard limit, it’s that he doesn’t get romantically entangled with his johns. The problem is, while Nick doesn’t want to be owned, Spencer’s no longer content with just renting.
*This 35,000 word novella was previously published.*

The Idiot

Into a compellingly real portrait of nineteenth-century Russian society, Dostoevsky introduces his ideal hero, the saintly Prince Myshkin. The tensions subsequently unleashed by the hero’s innocence, truthfulness, and humility betray the inadequacy of his moral idealism and disclose the spiritual emptiness of a society that cannot accommodate him. Myshkin’s mission ends in idiocy and darkness, but it is the world that is rotten, not he. Written under appalling personal circumstances when Dostoevsky was travelling in Europe, The Idiot not only reveals the author’s acute artistic sense and penetrating psychological insight, but also affords his most incisive indictment of Russia’s struggling to emulate contemporary Europe and sinking under the weight of Western materialism. This new translation by Alan Myers is meticulously faithful to the original and has a critical introduction by W. J. Leatherbarrow. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World’s Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford’s commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
(source: Bol.com)

Idiot

Do sveta plného zloby, falše, intríg a nelásky, do sveta mamony, karierizmu a nečestnosti privádza F. M. Dostojevskij svojho hrdinu, knieža Leva Myškina, v ktorom stvárnil svoju predstavu ideálne krásneho človeka. Úprimne, s detskou dôverčivosťou…

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Icebound

The arctic night is endless. The fear is numbing. Screams freeze in the throat. Death arrives in shades of white. Cold-blooded murder seems right at home….the chill of the grave.

Ice Station

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At a remote US ice station in Antarctica, a team of scientists has made an amazing discovery. They found something unbelievable buried deep below the surface – trapped inside a layer of ice 400 million years old.

Something made of metal…something which shouldn’t be there…it’s the discovery of a lifetime, a discovery of immeasurable value. And a discovery men will kill for.

Led by the enigmatic Lieutenant Shane Schofield, a crack team of US Marines is rushed to the ice station to secure this bizarre discovery for their nation. Meanwhile other countries have developed the same ideas, and are ready to pursue it swiftly and ruthlessly. Fortunately, Schofield’s men are a tough unit, all set to follow their leader into hell.

They soon discover they just did…

‘For lots of lethal violence involving high-tech weaponry. For thrilling escapes from the jaws of death. For cliffhanging suspense on just about every page…Ice Station delivers the action-thriller goods with all the explosive fire power of a machine pistol’ West Australian

(source: Bol.com)

The Ice Limit

Billionaire Palmer Lloyd is accustomed to getting what he wants–and what he wants for his new museum is the largest meteorite on earth. Unfortunately for Lloyd, it’s buried on an inhospitable Chilean island just north of the Ice Limit in the most brutal, unforgiving seas in the world.
Like Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child’s earlier collaborations (*Relic*, *Thunderhead*, and others), *The Ice Limit* tools along swiftly, blending nicely drawn characters (excepting, regrettably, the book’s true protagonist, the meteorite), a reasonably exciting narrative, and enough graspable science and plausible-seeming theories to bring readers happily up to speed and keep them climax-bound. Not the authors’ best effort, certainly, but a fine diversion nonetheless. *–Michael Hudson*

Ice and Fire

THE FOURTH INSTALMENT IN THE CHUNG KUO SERIESSpring 2201 – Spring 2203: The T’ang who make up the ruling Seven are struggling to maintain stasis and prevent change, as the “War That Wasn’t A War” is fought within the levels of Chung Kuo’s great world-spanning City: a war fought not with armies on battlefields but with an inventive evil – with bombs and betrayals, brutal assassinations and sly poisonings.Adding to the pressure for change is the existence of a document that charts the true history of this world, not the version invented and policed by the Ministry – the “Thousand Eyes” – who have, for so long, maintained this dark shadow at the very heart of Chung Kuo. Its discovery by the Dispersionists will fuel their ardent desire for change and for an end to Han rule.Lined up against the Dispersionists are a handful of men utterly loyal to the Seven – men like General Tolonen, along with the two men he has recruited from the Lowers, Gregor Karr and Kao Chen. When Tolonen destroys the newly-built generation-starship, The New Hope, he will change Chung Kuo for good by declaring war on the Dispertionists.