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Butcher Bird: A Novel of the Dominion

From Publishers Weekly

Buffyand Angel fans are likely to enjoy Kadrey’s offbeat supernatural romp, which blends demonic evil and quirky humor. The relatively normal life of San Francisco tattoo artist Spyder Lee goes thoroughly crazy when he’s rescued from a mugger by Shrike, a mysterious blind woman who reveals that Lee’s assailant was actually a demon. The wounds he suffered in the assault give him the ability to see the Dominions, other spheres of existence that regular mortals are unaware of. Soon Spyder finds himself hip-deep in demonic trouble, protecting his friend Lulu by offering his body to the organ-collecting Black and then dragging her off to join Shrike on a madcap journey to Hell, where they encounter monsters, Lucifer and even an alternate-time version of Lee himself. Kadrey (_Kamikaze L’Amour_) juxtaposes gore and brash insouciance in the face of apocalyptic evil, a blend that may not suit everyone’s taste. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Description

Spyder Lee is a happy man who lives in San Francisco and owns a tattoo shop. One night an angry demon tries to bite his head off before he’s saved by a stranger. The demon infected Spyder with something awful – the truth. He can suddenly see the world as it really is: full of angels and demons and monsters and monster-hunters. A world full of black magic and mysteries. These are the Dominions, parallel worlds full of wonder, beauty and horror. The Black Clerks, infinitely old and infinitely powerful beings whose job it is to keep the Dominions in balance, seem to have new interests and a whole new agenda. Dropped into the middle of a conflict between the Black Clerks and other forces he doesn’t fully understand, Spyder finds himself looking for a magic book with the blind swordswoman who saved him. Their journey will take them from deserts to lush palaces, to underground caverns, to the heart of Hell itself.

Busted Flush

From Publishers Weekly

The sequel to 2008’s Inside Straight, a revamp of the shared Wild Cards universe, features crises ripped directly from today’s newspaper headlines and summer blockbusters. A burgeoning gas shortage has sparked an invasion into the Middle East; New Orleans is hurricane-beset and zombie-ravaged; someone has set off a nuclear explosion in Texas; and genocide rages in Nigeria. The conflicts between the compellingly human superheroes on the U.N.’s Committee shape this fast-paced alternate history. Veteran contributor and now assistant editor Melinda M. Snodgrass pens standout chapters featuring British triple-agent Double Helix, who drives the plot while posing as both seductive Committee member Lilith and Middle Eastern assassin Bahir. While those unfamiliar with the Wild Cards mosaic novels will flounder, the clever twists on today’s political landscape and the unique powers of several new aces will lure back past readers. (Dec.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From

The Wild Cards revival continues in a second round of the TV show American Hero, a playoff contest between superheroes created by a mostly lethal alien virus and set in a realistically tangled and bloody world. Some players are troubleshooters, others cause trouble and shoot back, and a govement agency wants to get its hands on newcomer Drake, who can generate nuclear explosions out of his body. Drake’s jailbreak is one plotline in this installment of the multi-authored (one scribe or scribe-team per chapter) series, and it ropes in a Barbarian Days festival in Cross Plains, Texas, home of Conan creator Robert E. Howard. Others include an action-packed civil war in Nigeria and the effort to rescue humans and, this time, zombies from another New Orleans–bound hurricane. Somehow, characters remain the foci of a busy book that mixes the comic and the grim to good effect. For readers who can’t get enough, there’s an interactive Wild Cards Web site, too. –Roland Green

Burning Up

Passion runs as hot as a fever dream in these all-new stories by four *New York Times* bestselling provocateurs of the paranormal…
In Angela Knights’s *Blood and Roses*, a vampire warrior and his seductive captor join forces to stop a traitor from unleashing an army of demonic predators on their kingdom.
New in Nalini Singh’s Psy-Changeling series is *Whisper of Sin*, in which a woman in lethal danger finds an unlikely protector- and lover- in a volatile member of the DarkRiver pack.
Virginia Kantra continues the haunting tales of the Children of the Sea in *Shifting Sea,* the story of a wounded soldier rescued by a strange and enigmatic young woman.
Meljean Brook launches a bold new steampunk series with *Here There Be Monsters,* as a desperate woman strikes provocative- and terrifying- bargain to gain overseas passage.

Burning Bright

SUMMARY: New York Times bestselling and award-winning author Ron Rash is “a storyteller of the highest rank” (Jeffrey Lent) and has won comparisons to John Steinbeck, Cormac McCarthy, and Gabriel GarcÍa MÁrquez. It is rare that an author can capture the complexities of a place as though it were a person, and rarer still that one can reveal a land as dichotomous and fractious as Appalachia—a muse; a siren; a rugged, brutal landscape of exceptional beauty, promise, and suffering—with the honesty and precision of a photograph. “If you haven’t heard of the Southern writer Ron Rash, it is time you should” (The Plain Dealer). In Burning Bright, the stories span the years from the Civil War to the present day, and Rash’s historical and modern settings are sewn together in a hauntingly beautiful patchwork of suspense and myth, populated by raw and unforgettable characters mined from the landscape of Appalachia. In “Back of Beyond,” a pawnshop owner who profits from the stolen goods of local meth addicts—including his own nephew—comes to the aid of his brother and sister-in-law when they are threatened by their son. The pregnant wife of a Lincoln sympathizer alone in Confederate territory takes revenge to protect her family in “Lincolnites.” And in the title story, a woman from a small town marries an outsider; when an unknown arsonist starts fires in the Smoky Mountains, her husband becomes the key suspect. In these stories, Rash brings to light a previously unexplored territory, hidden in plain sight—first a landscape, and then the dark yet lyrical heart and the alluringly melancholy soul of his characters and their home.

Bungalow 2

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Danielle Steel takes us beyond the dazzle of Hollywood in her compelling new novel—the story of one woman’s journey from suburban mom to award-winning screenwriter…and all the joy, heartbreak, and challenges along the way.
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Bungalow 2
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The phone call came on a hot July day—a day like any other for Marin County mom and freelance writer Tanya Harris. But this call—from Tanya’s agent—was anything but ordinary, offering a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: the chance to write a major Hollywood screenplay, a dream she had put aside long ago to devote her energies to her family. This time, Tanya knows she cannot refuse, even though she’s torn about leaving her husband and their daughters. From the moment she steps into her lush bungalow at the fabled Beverly Hills Hotel, Tanya is thrust into an intoxicating new world where she feels reborn—energized by the creativity swirling around her—yet the pull of her family at home is strong.

Suddenly she’s working alongside A-list actors and a Hollywood legend: Oscar-winning producer Douglas Wayne, a man who always gets what he wants–and who seems to have his sights set on her. Flying home between shoots, struggling to reconnect with a family that seems to need her less and less, Tanya watches helplessly as her old life is pulled out from under her in the most crushing of ways.

As her two lives collide, as one award-winning film leads to another, Tanya begins to wonder if she can be a wife, a mother, and a writer at the same time. And just as she confronts the toughest choice she has faced, she is offered another dazzling opportunity—one that could recast her story in an amazing new direction, complete with an ending she never could have written herself.

In **Bungalow 2**, Danielle Steel takes us into a world few ever see—a world of fame and fortune, celebrity and genius–daring to show us the real lives, real dreams, and real struggles hidden beneath the flash and glitter of Hollywood.

From the Hardcover edition.
(source: Bol.com)

Bundle of Trouble

EDITORIAL REVIEW: **”Cigars all around”( LOUISE URE, SHAMUS AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR) for the new Maternal Instincts mystery series. First-time mom Kate Connelly is bringing up baby- and bringing down a killer.** Kate Connelly may have found the perfect work-from-home Mommy job: private investigator. After all, the hours are flexible, she can bring the baby along on stake-outs, and if you’re going to be up all night anyway, you might as well solve some crimes. But when a body is pulled from San Francisco Bay that may be her brother-in-law, Kate must crack the case faster than you can say “diaper rash” in order to keep her family together.

Bulletproof Bride

Tessa Beaumont’s life was well-ordered and well kept, and she was well on her way to the altar when Special Agent Gabe Colton stormed into her workplace–her life–sporting a ski mask and brandishing a gun–and took her hostage! Suddenly everything seemed so wrong–and it wasn’t that she missed her old life. It was that she didn’t. Gabe had never intended to kidnap the innocent bank teller, but she knew too much. It was his job to keep her safe–and his hands to himself. Tessa was an important witness and a woman about to marry a man she didn’t love. Unless the sexy special agent could convince her otherwise…

(source: Bol.com)

Building homebrew equipment

Product Description

Since 1973, Storey’s Country Wisdom Bulletins have offered practical, hands-on instructions designed to help readers master dozens of country living skills quickly and easily. There are now more than 170 titles in this series, and their remarkable popularity reflects the common desire of country and city dwellers alike to cultivate personal independence in everyday life.

From the Back Cover

Since the 1973 publication of Storey’s first Country Wisdom Bulletin, our commitment to preserving the arts, crafts, and skills of country life has never wavered. We now have more than 200 titles in this series of 32-page publications, and their remarkable popularity reflects the common desire of country and city dwellers alike to cultivate personal independence in everyday life.

Storey’s Country Wisdom Bulletins contain practical, hands-on instructions designed to help you master dozens of country living skills quickly and easily. From traditional skills to the newest techniques, Storey’s Bulletins provide a foundation of earth-friendly information for the way you want to live today.

Broken prey

SUMMARY: In the wake of a series of killings that disturbingly emulates the works of a trio of inmates currently being held at the Minnesota Security Hospital, Lucas Davenport investigates a missing man who was released from the hospital weeks earlier. By the author of Hidden Prey. Lit Guild Main. BOMC Main. Doubleday Main. Mystery Guild Main.

The Broken Blade

Sorak, elfin hero of the author’s *Tribe of One *trilogy, along with his friend and lover, Ryana, embarks on a mission of mercy for his new master, the Sage. Original. 75,000 first printing.

Broken Angels

SUMMARY: Fifty years after the events of ALTERED CARBON, Takeshi Kovacs is serving as a mercenary in the Procterate-sponsored war to put down Joshuah Kemp’s revolution on the planet Sanction IV. He is offered the chance to join a covert team chasing a prize whose value is limitless — and whose dangers are endless. Here is a novel that takes mankind to the brink.A breakneck-paced crime thriller, ALTERED CARBON took its readers deep into the universe Morgan had so compellingly realised without ever letting them escape the onward rush of the plot. BROKEN ANGELS melds SF, the war novel and the spy thriller to take the reader below the surface of this future and lay bare the treacheries, betrayals and follies that leave man so ill-prepared for the legacy he has been given: the stars. This is SF at its dizzying best: superb, yet subtle, world-building; strong yet sensitive characterisation; awesome yet believable technology, thilling yet profound writing. Richard Morgan is set to join the genre’s world-wide elite.

Bright-sided: how the relentless promotion of positive thinking has undermined America

SUMMARY: A sharp-witted knockdown of America’s love affair with positive thinking and an urgent call for a new commitment to realismAmericans are a “positive” people—cheerful, optimistic, and upbeat: this is our reputation as well as our self-image. But more than a temperament, being positive, we are told, is the key to success and prosperity. In this utterly original take on the American frame of mind, Barbara Ehrenreich traces the strange career of our sunny outlook from its origins as a marginal nineteenth-century healing technique to its enshrinement as a dominant, almost mandatory, cultural attitude. Evangelical mega-churches preach the good news that you only have to want something to get it, because God wants to “prosper” you. The medical profession prescribes positive thinking for its presumed health benefits. Academia has made room for new departments of “positive psychology” and the “science of happiness.” Nowhere, though, has bright-siding taken firmer root than within the business community, where, as Ehrenreich shows, the refusal even to consider negative outcomes—like mortgage defaults—contributed directly to the current economic crisis. With the mythbusting powers for which she is acclaimed, Ehrenreich exposes the downside of America’s penchant for positive thinking: On a personal level, it leads to self-blame and a morbid preoccupation with stamping out “negative” thoughts. On a national level, it’s brought us an era of irrational optimism resulting in disaster. This is Ehrenreich at her provocative best—poking holes in conventional wisdom and faux science, and ending with a call for existential clarity and courage. Barbara Ehrenreich is the author of numerous books, including Dancing in the Streets and The New York Times bestsellers Nickel and Dimed and Bait and Switch. A frequent contributor to Harper’s and The Nation, she has also been a columnist at The New York Times and Time magazine. In Bright-sided, Barbara Ehrenreich reveals how the positive thinking movement, though seemingly harmless, has in fact deluded America and played a role in some of the most destructive events in recent U.S. history. Far from just a “healthy mindset,” bright-siding is an epidemic of self-deception that has spread to all circles of American life, from preachers who celebrate the power of prayer, to doctors who promote optimism’s healing abilities. It led officials to overlook clues of 9/11 and overestimate the strength of New Orleans’ levees, and enabled the business world to make egregiously unsafe loans that caused the worst financial crisis since World War II. Ehrenreich exposes the consequences of the belief that positive thinking is the key to achieving success and prosperity—a notion which, at its most dangerous, prevents people from even considering the negative outcomes of major events or their own actions. “In this hard-hitting but honest appraisal, America’s cultural skeptic Barbara Ehrenreich turns her focus on the muddled American phenomenon of positive thinking. She exposes the pseudoscience and pseudointellectual foundation of the positive-thinking movement for what it is: a house of cards. This is a mind-opening read.”—Michael Shermer, author of Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time “Barbara Ehrenreich wants to make clear that she is not a spoilsport. ‘No one can call me a sourpuss,’ she declared. ‘I have a big foot in the joy camp.’ She is the author of Dancing in the Streets, a history of ‘collective joy,’ she notes, and a lot of fun at parties. So her new book, Bright-sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America, should not be mistaken for a curmudgeonly rant. It is serious social history.Many of the 17 books that Ms. Ehrenreich has written during the past three and half decades have taken her into alien worlds. In her fantastically successful 2001 book, Nickel and Dimed, for example, she details her experience of trying to get by on the salary of an unskilled, minimum-wage worker. By contrast, this newest volume is based on her stay in a world that she became intimately familiar with: the smiley-faced, pink-ribboned, positive-thinking culture that surrounds breast cancer patients . . . In Bright-sided, she traces the roots of the nation’s blithe sunniness to a reaction against Calvinist gloom and the limits of medical science in the first half of the 19th century. Starting with Phineas Parkhurst Quimby, perhaps one of the first American New Age faith healers, she draws a line to Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science; the psychologist William James; Ralph Waldo Emerson; Norman Vincent Peale, who published The Power of Positive Thinking in 1952; and the toothy television minister Joel Osteen, who preaches the gospel of prosperity.”—Patricia Cohen, The New York Times”When I finished Barbara Ehrenreich’s Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America, I went in search of a stiff drink—or something that would allow me to escape, if only briefly, the feeling that I have been blind to the unyielding grip that positive thinking has on our culture. Very little I have read elsewhere has suggested that the current recession is good for us, but Ehrenreich implies that the implosion of our economy may bring us to our senses and that reason and common sense might have a chance to disempower the foolish, self-serving and dangerous promotion of positive thinking reaching into all areas of our lives: our health, jobs, science, religion, politics. She is relentless—and persuasive—in her determination to convince us of this. Her notes run to 15 pages of titles of papers, articles, books and television interviews she has researched to support her contention that the unwarranted optimism urged on us by church and corporations, by medical and psychological ‘experts,’ has distorted the reality of the disaster we now find ourselves facing . . . So what’s with all this negativity Ehrenreich forces on us? Isn’t positive thinking better than being a spoilsport? In a voice urgent and passionate, Ehrenreich offers us neither extreme but instead balance: joy, happiness, yes; sadness, anger, yes. She favors life with a clear head, eyes wide open.”—Jane Juska, San Francisco Chronicle“We’re always being told that looking on the bright side is good for us, but now we see that it’s a great way to brush off poverty, disease, and unemployment, to rationalize an order where all the rewards go to those on top. The people who are sick or jobless—why, they just aren’t thinking positively. They have no one to blame but themselves. Barbara Ehrenreich has put the menace of positive thinking under the microscope. Anyone who’s ever been told to brighten up needs to read this book.”—Thomas Frank, author of The Wrecking Crew and What’s the Matter with Kansas?“Unless you keep on saying that you believe in fairies, Tinker Bell will check out, and what’s more, her sad demise will be your fault! Barbara Ehrenreich scores again for the independent-minded in resisting this drool and all those who wallow in it.”—Christopher Hitchens, author of God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything“In this hard-hitting but honest appraisal, America’s cultural skeptic Barbara Ehrenreich turns her focus on the muddled American phenomenon of positive thinking. She exposes the pseudoscience and pseudointellectual foundation of the positive-thinking movement for what it is: a house of cards. This is a mind-opening read.”—Michael Shermer, author of Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time“Once again, Barbara Ehrenreich has written an invaluable and timely book, offering a brilliant analysis of the causes and dimensions of our current cultural and economic crises. She shows how deeply positive thinking is embedded in our history and how crippling it is as a habit of mind.”—Thomas Bender, author of A Nation Among Nations: America’s Place in World History“Oprah Winfrey, Deepak Chopra, Andrew Weil: please read this relentlessly sensible book. It’s never too late to begin thinking clearly.”—Frederick Crews, author of Follies of the Wise: Dissenting Essays“Barbara Ehrenreich’s skeptical common sense is just what we need to penetrate the cloying fog that passes for happiness in America.”—Alan Wolfe, author of The Future of Liberalism“In this hilarious and devastating critique, Barbara Ehrenreich applies some much needed negativity to the zillion-dollar business of positive thinking. This is truly a text for the times.”—Katha Pollitt, author of The Mind-Body Problem: Poems”In Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Notion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America, Barbara Ehrenreich reprises her role as Dorothy swishing back the curtain on a great and powerful given: ‘Americans are a “positive” people.’ Sunny, self-confident optimism defines us as individuals and as a nation. Humbug. Ehrenreich wants us to pay close attention to the truth behind the hype—positive thinking is hurting America, from obliging one another to turn that frown upside-down, to 2008’s financial meltdown . . . ‘Flapdoodle,’ crows Ehrenreich, and the fun begins. Like flying monkeys tearing apart the Scarecrow, she shreds theories based on quantum physics (neuronal impulses are far too large to be influenced by quantum effects), magnetism (the magnetic properties of thought are swamped by competing magnetisms — like the Earth’s!), and magic (pay no attention to that man behind the curtain). Ehrenreich likewise thrashes from top to bottom ‘the motivators and gurus of positivity,’ from Rhonda Byrne, author of The Secret, to prosperity preachers like Joel Osteen. Osteen makes a juicy target, sidestepping as he does sin and salvation in favor of the ‘prosperity gospel’—‘You can have that new car or house or necklace, because God wants to “prosper you.”’ In spurning Osteen as a heretical fake, Ehrenreich fights dirty, mocking Osteen’s height (he’s shorter in person) and his mullet (it’s longer). Ehrenreich claims she approached her initial meeting with Martin Seligman, the father of positive psychology, ‘with trepidation,’ yet we almost expect her to say, ‘Just one more thing . . .’ à la Lt. Columbo, as she tries to pin down the exact measurements of Seligman’s “equation” for happiness, a contrivance that makes him ‘look like the Wizard of Oz.’ The refutation and character assassination, while entertaining, serve to show how positive thinking is as rickety a construct as the Wizard, merely masking insecurities about a world we can’t really control. So complete is Ehrenreich’s argument that she plays her own devil’s advocate: positive thinking requires self-deception, ‘a constant effort to repress or block out unpleasant possibilities and “negative” thoughts’—like those created by scathing social critiques . . . Those readers who’ve ‘gone so far down this yellow brick road that “positive” seems to us the way you should be’ may bite their nails over the demystification in Bright-Sided. Ehrenreich’s advice on where to go from here is a workable antidote to the pursuit of secret formulas that don’t exist.”—Kassten Alonso, The Oregonian (Portland)”Two-thirds of the way into the book, its theme shines through like sunlight in an old-time Baptist window, the kind they don’t make anymore because nobody knows how and even if they did they wouldn’t have the patience. It’s much easier and faster these days simply to visualize it and wish for it according to the directives of the positive-thinking life coaches of the prosperity-gospel churches. And while you’re about it, you might as well visualize a big house in the suburbs with an adjustable-rate mortgage or a diamond necklace instead, or any other nice piece of bling . . . In precisely crafted, hard-hitting language throughout, she explains how hordes of optimistic American consumers, under the spell of ‘new age’ authors and psychologists, television preachers and celebrities, visualized and wished (with a lot of help from credit cards) for so much stuff that now they are enmeshed in unwished-for bankruptcy in record numbers . . . This hard-boiled analysis of the national mass fantasy of wishful thinking contributed, says the author, to the economic collapse of 2008. It represents her hope for recovery from ‘the mass delusion that is positive thinking.’ Her personal vision, she says, is composed of better jobs and better health care for all, and a chance for everyone to contribute through clear thinking and hard work, not through the notion that we can ‘levitate ourselves into that blessed condition by wishing it.'”—Tom Dodge, The Dallas Morning News”Ehrenreich, author of the best-selling Nickel and Dimed, delivers her indictments of the happiness industry with both authority and wit. . . . Others have critiqued the positivity movement, but Ehrenreich does an impressive job of analyzing its broader social impact.”—Kristin Ohlson, The Plain Dealer (Cleveland)”Ehrenreich convinced me completely. . . I hesitate to say anything so positive as that this book will change the way you see absolutely everything; but it just might.”—Nora Ephron, The Daily Beast”Positive thinking should never be the same after Barbara Ehrenreich’s Bright-Sided . . . Ehrenreich is a sharp and reliable student of the divided middle class, as good as the American left can boast. In attacking the thick irrationality of our public lives, [this book] homes in on a particularly salient line of argument—that positive thinking is not only preposterous but pernicious.”—John Summers, Bookforum”Accomplished social critic Ehrenreich eviscerates the positive-thinking movement, which she blames for encouraging us to ‘deny reality, submit cheerfully to misfortune, and blame only ourselves for our fate.’ The author argues that the promotion of unwarranted optimism began in the early days of the American republic, was taken up by 19th-century philosophers and mystics—William James urged people to repeat to themselves ‘Youth, health, vigor!’ while dressing in the morning—and entered the American mainstream in the 20th century, when it became an integral part of consumer culture. Ehrenreich’s quarrel is not with feeling upbeat but rather with the ‘inescapable pseudoscientific flapdoodle’ of life coaches and self-improvement products claiming that thinking positively will result in wealth, success and other joyful outcomes. Such magical thinking has become a means of social control in the workplace—where uncheerful employees are ostracized—and prevents action to achieve social change. With life coaches, business motivators and evangelical preachers promoting delusional expectations . . . positive thinking can claim partial credit for a major role in such recent disastrous events as the Iraq war and the financial meltdown. Ehrenreich’s many interviews include meetings with psychologist Martin Seligman, whose ‘positive psychology,’ she finds, offers little credible evidence to make it any different from the wishing-will-make-it-so thinking of writers from Dale Carnegie (How to Win Friends & Influence People) to Rhonda Byrne (The Secret). The author’s tough-minded and convincing broadside raises troubling questions about many aspects of contemporary American life, and she provides an antidote to the pervasive culture of cheerfulness—reality-based critical thinking that will encourage people to alter social arrangements in ways that improve their lives. Bright, incisive, provocative thinking from a top-notch nonfiction writer.”—Kirkus Reviews”Ehrenreich delivers a trenchant look into the burgeoning business of positive thinking. A bout with breast cancer puts the author face to face with this new breed of frenetic positive thinking promoted by everyone from scientists to gurus and activists. Chided for her anger and distress by doctors and fellow cancer patients and survivors, Ehrenreich explores the insistence upon optimism as a cultural and national trait, discovering its ‘symbiotic relationship with American capitalism’ and how poverty, obesity, unemployment and relationship problems are being marketed as obstacles that can be overcome with the right (read: positive) mindset. Building on Max Weber’s insights into the relationship between Calvinism and capitalism, Ehrenreich sees the dark roots of positive thinking emerging from 19th-century religious movements. Mary Baker Eddy, William James and Norman Vincent Peale paved the path for today’s secular $9.6 billion self-improvement industry and positive psychology institutes. The author concludes by suggesting that the bungled invasion of Iraq and current economic mess may be intricately tied to this ‘reckless’ national penchant for self-delusion and a lack of anxious vigilance, necessary to societal survival.”—Publishers Weekly

Bright Young Things

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Bright Young Things (Bright Young Things Series #1) by Anna Godbersen
The year is 1929. New York is ruled by the Bright Young Things: flappers and socialites seeking thrills and chasing dreams in the anything-goes era of the Roaring Twenties.
Letty Larkspur and Cordelia Grey escaped their small Midwestern town for New York’s glittering metropolis. All Letty wants is to see her name in lights, but she quickly discovers Manhattan is filled with pretty girls who will do anything to be a star. . . .
Cordelia is searching for the father she’s never known, a man as infamous for his wild parties as he is for his shadowy schemes. Overnight, she enters a world more thrilling and glamorous than she ever could have imagined—and more dangerous. It’s a life anyone would kill for . . . and someone will.
The only person Cordelia can trust is ­Astrid Donal, a flapper who seems to have it all: money, looks, and the love of Cordelia’s brother, Charlie. But Astrid’s perfect veneer hides a score of family secrets.
Across the vast lawns of Long Island, in the ­illicit speakeasies of Manhattan, and on the blindingly lit stages of Broadway, the three girls’ fortunes will rise and fall—together and apart. From the *New York Times*-bestselling author of *The Luxe* comes an epic new series set in the dizzying last summer of the Jazz Age.

A Briefer History of Time

EDITORIAL REVIEW: From One of the Most Brilliant Minds of Our TimeComes a Book that Clarifies His Most Important Ideas****Stephen Hawking’s worldwide bestseller, **A Brief History of Time***,* remains one of the landmark volumes in scientific writing of our time. But for years readers have asked for a more accessible formulation of its key concepts—the nature of space and time, the role of God in creation, and the history and future of the universe. Professor Hawking’s response is this new work that will guide nonscientists everywhere in the ongoing search for the tantalizing secrets at the heart of time and space.… ****Although “briefer,” this book is much more than a mere explanation of Hawking’s earlier work. **A Briefer History of Time** both clarifies and expands on the great subjects of the original, and records the latest developments in the field—from string theory to the search for a unified theory of all the forces of physics. Thirty-seven full-color illustrations enhance the text and make** A Briefer History of Time** an exhilarating and must-have addition in its own right to the great literature of science and ideas.**

The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama

EDITORIAL REVIEW: No story has been more central to America’s history this century than the rise of Barack Obama, and until now, no journalist or historian has written a book that** **fully investigates the circumstances and experiences of Obama’s life or explores the ambition behind his rise.** **Those familiar with Obama’s own best-selling memoir** **or his campaign speeches know the touchstones and details that he chooses to emphasize, but now—from a writer whose gift for illuminating the historical significance** **of unfolding events is without peer—we have a portrait, at once masterly and fresh,** **nuanced and unexpected, of a young man in search of himself,** **and of a rising politician determined to become the first African-American president.*The Bridge* offers the most complete account yet of** **Obama’s tragic father, a brilliant economist who abandoned** **his family and ended his life as a beaten man;** **of his mother, Stanley Ann Dunham,** **who had a child as a teenager and then built her career as an anthropologist living and studying in Indonesia;** **and of the succession of elite institutions that first exposed Obama** **to the social tensions and intellectual currents** **that would force him to imagine and fashion an identity for himself. Through extensive on-the-record interviews with friends and teachers, mentors and disparagers, family members and Obama himself,** **David Remnick allows us to see how a rootless, unaccomplished, and confused young man** **created himself first as a community organizer in Chicago, an** **experience that would not only shape his urge to work in politics but give him a home and a community, and that would propel him to Harvard Law School, where his sense of a greater mission emerged.Deftly setting Obama’s political career against the galvanizing intersection of race and politics in Chicago’s history, Remnick shows us how that city’s complex racial legacy would make Obama’s forays into politics a source of controversy and bare-knuckle tactics: his clashes with older black politicians in the Illinois State Senate, his disastrous decision to challenge the former Black Panther Bobby Rush for Congress in 2000, the sex scandals that would decimate his more experienced opponents in the 2004 Senate race, and the story—from both sides—of his confrontation with his former pastor, Jeremiah Wright.** **By looking at Obama’s political rise through the prism of our racial history, Remnick gives us the conflicting agendas of black politicians: the dilemmas of men like Jesse Jackson, John Lewis, and Joseph Lowery,** **heroes of the civil rights movement, who are forced to reassess old loyalties and understand the priorities of a new generation of African-American leaders.*The Bridge* revisits the American drama of race, from slavery to civil rights, and makes clear how Obama’s quest is not just his own but is emblematic of a nation where destiny is defined by individuals keen to imagine a future that is different from the reality of their current lives. EDITORIAL REVIEW: No story has been more central to America’s history this century than the rise of Barack Obama, and until now, no journalist or historian has written a book that** **fully investigates the circumstances and experiences of Obama’s life or explores the ambition behind his rise.** **Those familiar with Obama’s own best-selling memoir** **or his campaign speeches know the touchstones and details that he chooses to emphasize, but now—from a writer whose gift for illuminating the historical significance** **of unfolding events is without peer—we have a portrait, at once masterly and fresh,** **nuanced and unexpected, of a young man in search of himself,** **and of a rising politician determined to become the first African-American president.*The Bridge* offers the most complete account yet of** **Obama’s tragic father, a brilliant economist who abandoned** **his family and ended his life as a beaten man;** **of his mother, Stanley Ann Dunham,** **who had a child as a teenager and then built her career as an anthropologist living and studying in Indonesia;** **and of the succession of elite institutions that first exposed Obama** **to the social tensions and intellectual currents** **that would force him to imagine and fashion an identity for himself. Through extensive on-the-record interviews with friends and teachers, mentors and disparagers, family members and Obama himself,** **David Remnick allows us to see how a rootless, unaccomplished, and confused young man** **created himself first as a community organizer in Chicago, an** **experience that would not only shape his urge to work in politics but give him a home and a community, and that would propel him to Harvard Law School, where his sense of a greater mission emerged.Deftly setting Obama’s political career against the galvanizing intersection of race and politics in Chicago’s history, Remnick shows us how that city’s complex racial legacy would make Obama’s forays into politics a source of controversy and bare-knuckle tactics: his clashes with older black politicians in the Illinois State Senate, his disastrous decision to challenge the former Black Panther Bobby Rush for Congress in 2000, the sex scandals that would decimate his more experienced opponents in the 2004 Senate race, and the story—from both sides—of his confrontation with his former pastor, Jeremiah Wright.** **By looking at Obama’s political rise through the prism of our racial history, Remnick gives us the conflicting agendas of black politicians: the dilemmas of men like Jesse Jackson, John Lewis, and Joseph Lowery,** **heroes of the civil rights movement, who are forced to reassess old loyalties and understand the priorities of a new generation of African-American leaders.*The Bridge* revisits the American drama of race, from slavery to civil rights, and makes clear how Obama’s quest is not just his own but is emblematic of a nation where destiny is defined by individuals keen to imagine a future that is different from the reality of their current lives.

Bridge of Birds

EDITORIAL REVIEW: When the children of his village were struck with a mysterious illness, Number Ten Ox found master Li Kao. Together they set out to find the Great Root of Power, the only possible cure, and together they discover adventure and legend, and the power of belief….