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Cosmos

**RETURNING TO TELEVISION AS AN ALL-NEW MINISERIES ON FOX**
*Cosmos* is one of the bestselling science books of all time. In clear-eyed prose, Sagan reveals a jewel-like blue world inhabited by a life form that is just beginning to discover its own identity and to venture into the vast ocean of space. Featuring a new Introduction by Sagan’s collaborator, Ann Druyan, full color illustrations, and a new Foreword by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, *Cosmos* retraces the fourteen billion years of cosmic evolution that have transformed matter into consciousness, exploring such topics as the origin of life, the human brain, Egyptian hieroglyphics, spacecraft missions, the death of the Sun, the evolution of galaxies, and the forces and individuals who helped to shape modern science.
**Praise for *Cosmos ** *

“Magnificent . . . With a lyrical literary style, and a range that touches almost all aspects of human knowledge, * Cosmos* often seems too good to be true.” **— *The Plain Dealer ** *

“Sagan is an astronomer with one eye on the stars, another on history, and a third—his mind’s—on the human condition.” **—* Newsday***

“Brilliant in its scope and provocative in its suggestions . . . shimmers with a sense of wonder.” **— *The Miami Herald ** *

“Sagan dazzles the mind with the miracle of our survival, framed by the stately galaxies of space.” **—* Cosmopolitan***

“Enticing . . . iridescent . . . imaginatively illustrated.” **— *The New York Times Book Review** ** *

The Captain of the Polestar and Other Tales

This early work by Arthur Conan Doyle was originally published in 1890 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1859. It was between 1876 and 1881, while studying medicine at the University of Edinburgh, that he began writing short stories, and his first piece was published in Chambers’s Edinburgh Journal before he was 20. In 1887, Conan Doyle’s first significant work, A Study in Scarlet, appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual. It featured the first appearance of detective Sherlock Holmes, the protagonist who was to eventually make Conan Doyle’s reputation. A prolific writer, Conan Doyle continued to produce a range of fictional works over the following years. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Black Maria

On the surface, Aunt Maria seems like a cuddly old lady, all chit-chat and lace doilies and unadulterated NICEness!
When Mig and her family go for a short visit, they soon learn that Aunt Maria rules the place with a rod of sweetness that’s tougher than iron and deadlier than poison. Life revolves around tea parties, while the men are all grey-suited zombies who fade into the background, and the other children seem like clones.
The short visit becomes a long stay, and when all talk of going home ceases, Mig despairs! Things go from bad to worse when Mig’s brother Chris tries to rebel, but is changed into a wolf .
Mig is convinced that Aunt Maria must be a witch – but who will believe her? It’s up to Mig to figure out what’s going on. Maybe the ghost who haunts the downstairs bedroom holds the key?

Animal Farm

The animals on Mr. Jones’ farm revolt against their human masters and violently expel them. Led by the pigs they decide to run the farm themselves on egalitarian principles. In Course of time the pigs themselves become corrupted by power and a new tyranny is established under their leader Napoleon.
A resounding fable on totalitarianism and power-gone-corrupt, Animal Farm is an allegorical novella that took the publishing world by storm when it was first published and hasn’t stopped doing so ever since. The ultimate satire on fascism, Animal Farm finds relevance even in present-day world. A must-read!
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Eric Arthur Blair (1903-1950), better known by his pen-name, **George Orwell** , was born in India, where his father worked for the Civil Services. An author and journalist, Orwell was one of the most prominent and influential figures in twentieth-century literature. His works spoke out against the social injustice that was prevalent at that time.  His unique political allegory ‘Animal Farm’ was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with the dystopia of ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. His novels and non-fiction include ‘Burmese Days’, ‘Down and Out in Paris and London’, ‘The Road to Wigan Pier’ and ‘Homage to Catalonia’. **
### Recensione
True Agony of a Socialist Orwell is obviously angry at the way Socialism has been distorted by Stalin. Using Animal characters as symbols Orwell honestly mocks and criticizes the Russian leadership under Lenin. It is a very easy to read book giving good perspectives on the Socialist Revolution. –Abhishek Kona Aug 22, 2011
Animal Farm is a satirical allegory on the Russian Revolution. Orwell explains it, It is the history of revolution that went wrong. It tells the simple and tragic story of what happens when the oppressed farm rebel to attain freedom from Mr. Jones. It is about their attempt to rule the farm themselves on the basis of equality. The animals had initially aimed to form a utopian society, where each would work according to his capacity, respecting the needs of the others. But, they failed to do so. And, Animal Farm ended up being a dictatorship of the pigs that were the brightest, but did no physical work in reality. The main action of the story stands for The Russian Revolution of 1917 and the early years of the Soviet Union. Animalism is a metaphor for Communism. Manor farm is an allegory of Russia, Mr. Jones is Russian C-Zar, Old Major stands for Karl Marx, and Snowball represents Leo Trotsky. Napolean stands for Stalin, while the dogs are the secret police. The horse, Boxer stands for the working class which works constantly for the greater good while Squealer is the propagandist. The novel is skillfully organized and presents the horrors of communism through simple story-telling. It presents what propaganda and brain washing do to the people living under the dictatorship. How the fickle minded people were swayed easily by the pigs, who managed to reverse the seven commandments and reduce them to Four legs good, two legs better . I would recommend this book to everyone above 14 years of age who has some knowledge about communism or a hint of what happened during the Russian Revolution of 1917. The book is gripping as there is always something happening. It ends with the pigs becoming mush like humans and changing the name of the farm back to the Manor Farm . The ending was sad it shows how power turns comrades into tyrannical dictators. –Diksha Mahajan Aug 14, 2012
George Orwell is probably one of the few authors who has more than one book featuring regularly in the all the favorites of most people. In such a short book, we get to experience the entire range of the human emotions – probably characterized by the animals. But, what this book basically makes us realize is the fact that politics is relevant at all times. –Deep Agrawal Mar 2, 2012
### Descrizione del libro
Volume 8 of *The Complete Works of George Orwell*

The Adventure of the Final Problem

“The Final Problem” is a short story by British writer Arthur Conan Doyle featuring his detective character Sherlock Holmes. It was first published in Strand Magazine in December 1893. It appears in book form as part of the collection The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Conan Doyle later ranked “The Final Problem” fourth on his personal list of the twelve best Holmes stories. wiki

Adventure of the Devil’s Foot

In recording from time to time some of the curious experiences and interesting recollections which I associate with my long and intimate friendship with Mr. Sherlock Holmes, I have continually been faced by difficulties caused by his own aversion to publicity. To his sombre and cynical spirit all popular applause was always abhorrent, and nothing amused him more at the end of a successful case than to hand over the actual exposure to some orthodox official, and to listen with a mocking smile to the general chorus of misplaced congratulation. It was indeed this attitude upon the part of my friend and certainly not any lack of interesting material which has caused me of late years to lay very few of my records before the public. My participation in some of his adventures was always a privilege which entailed discretion and reticence upon me.

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Complete Brand New Edition “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the second of the twelve Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine in 1892. Miss Susan Cushing of Croydon receives a parcel in the post that contains two severed human ears packed in coarse salt. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard suspects a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their unruly behaviour. The parcel was sent from Belfast, the city of origin of one of the former boarders. Upon examining the parcel himself, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime. He reasons that a medical student with access to a dissection laboratory would likely use something other than plain salt to preserve human remains, and would be able to make a more precise cut than the roughly hacked ears suggest. The address on the package, roughly written and with a spelling correction, suggests to Holmes that the sender lacks education and is unfamiliar with Croydon. The knot in the string suggests to Holmes that they are looking for someone with sailing experience. **
### Sinossi
The Adventure of the Cardboard Box By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Complete Brand New Edition “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the second of the twelve Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine in 1892. Miss Susan Cushing of Croydon receives a parcel in the post that contains two severed human ears packed in coarse salt. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard suspects a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their unruly behaviour. The parcel was sent from Belfast, the city of origin of one of the former boarders. Upon examining the parcel himself, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime. He reasons that a medical student with access to a dissection laboratory would likely use something other than plain salt to preserve human remains, and would be able to make a more precise cut than the roughly hacked ears suggest. The address on the package, roughly written and with a spelling correction, suggests to Holmes that the sender lacks education and is unfamiliar with Croydon. The knot in the string suggests to Holmes that they are looking for someone with sailing experience.

Women in Love

Women in Love, by D. H. Lawrence, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today’s top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader’s viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader’s understanding of these enduring works. One of the most versatile and influential figures in twentieth-century literature, D. H. Lawrence was a master craftsman and profound thinker whose celebration of sexuality in an over-intellectualized world opened the door to that topic for countless writers after him. Perhaps his finest novel, Women in Love (1920) continues the story of two sisters, Ursula and Gudrun Brangwen, who first appeared in Lawrence’s novel The Rainbow (1915). The story contrasts the passionate love affairs of Ursula and Rupert Birkin, a character often seen as a self-portrait of Lawrence, with that of Gudrun and Gerald Crich, an icily handsome mining industrialist. Birkin, an introspective misanthrope, struggles to reconcile his metaphysical drive for self-fulfillment with Ursula’s practical view of sentimental passion. As they fight their way through to a mutually satisfying relationship—and eventual marriage—Gudrun and Crich’s sadomasochistic love affair careens toward a disastrous conclusion. A dark, disturbing, yet beautiful exploration of love in an increasingly violent and destructive world, Women in Love nevertheless holds out the hope of individual and collective rebirth through human intensity and passion. Norman Loftis is a poet, novelist, essayist, philosopher, and filmmaker. His works include Exiles and Voyages (poetry, 1969), Black Anima (poetry, 1973), Life Force (novel, 1982), From Barbarism to Decadence (1984), and Condition Zero (1993). His feature films include Schaman (1984), the award-winning Small Time (1989), and Messenger (1995). He is currently Chair of the Department of Literature at the Brooklyn Campus of the College of New Rochelle and is on the faculty at Medgar Evers College, CUNY, where he has taught since 1970.

The Woman in White

The Woman in White (1859-60) is the first and greatest ”Sensation Novel.” Walter Hartright’s mysterious midnight encounter with the woman in white draws him into a vortex of crime, poison, kidnapping, and international intrigue. This new critical edition is the first to use the original manuscript of the novel. John Sutherland examines Collins’s contribution to Victorian fiction, traces his practices as a creator of plot, and provides a chronology of the novel’s complicated events.

The Woman in White (1859-60) is the first and greatest `Sensation Novel’. Walter Hartright’s mysterious midnight encounter with the woman in white draws him into a vortex of crime, poison, kidnapping, and international intrigue.
The novel is dominated by two of the finest creations in all Victorian fiction – Marion Halcombe, dark, mannish, yet irresistibly fascinating, and Count Fosco, the sinister and flamboyant `Napoleon of Crime’. A masterwork of intricate construction, The Woman in White sets new standards of suspense and excitement, and achieved sales which topped even those of Dickens, Collins’s friend and mentor.
**Recensie(s)**

Collins was a master craftsman, whom many modern mystery-mongers might imitate to their profit. –Dorothy L. Sayers
(source: Bol.com)

The Winter’s Tale

One of Shakespeare’s later plays, best described as a tragi-comedy, the play falls into two distinct parts. In the first Leontes is thrown into a jealous rage by his suspicions of his wife Hermione and his best-friend, and imprisons her and orders that her new born daughter be left to perish. The second half is a pastoral comedy with the “lost” daughter Perdita having been rescued by shepherds and now in love with a young prince. The play ends with former lovers and friends reunited after the apparently miraculous resurrection of Hermione.
John Pitcher’s lively introduction and commentary explores the extraordinary merging of theatrical forms in the play and its success in performance. As the recent Sam Mendes production at the Old Vic shows, this is a play that can work a kind of magic in the theatre.
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Why Read the Classics?

Amazon.com Review

Why read Italo Calvino’s book on the classics? Because it passes his own test for what a classic is, and its brisk prose can blast your concept of the word clean of the dusty associations that cling to it. Calvino gives 14 offbeat definitions of classic, my favorite being “a work which constantly generates a pulviscular cloud of critical discourse around it, but which always shakes the particles off.” His sharp essays on Conrad, Dickens, Diderot, Flaubert, Ovid, and others constitute an act of self-criticism too, a novelist’s imaginative autobiography. In 1955, when rave-reviewing __, he called Daniel Defoe the “inventor of modern journalism.” In 1954, he overcame his disgust with Hemingway’s life “of violent tourism,” coolly assessed his dry heights and sodden depths, and called himself Papa’s apprentice. And the 1984 piece on Borges shows who influenced Calvino most once he’d become a master himself.

From both the American and the Argentinian, Calvino learned to be concise, and his quick sketches of books like the “unqualified masterpiece” _Our Mutual Friend_ provide a contact high–one wants to drop everything and head straight to a library, so infectious is his enthusiasm. “How many young people will be smitten” by Stendhal’s recently, brilliantly retranslated Waterloo-era adventure _The Charterhouse of Parma_, he writes, “recognizing it as the novel they had always wanted to read… the benchmark for all the other novels they will read in later life.” Like a great teacher, Italo Calvino distills a writer’s essence in a vivid phrase: money, for instance, serves as “the motive force of Balzac’s narrative, the true test of feeling in Dickens; but in Mark Twain money is a game of mirrors, causing vertigo over a void.” –Tim Appelo

From Publishers Weekly

Although the title suggests that this posthumous collection was cobbled together to capitalize on the latest culture wars, the great Italian novelist who died in 1985 had himself planned to compile it. The book remains an uneven hodgepodge of essays and brief introductions. In the outstanding opening essay, Calvino begins with the lighthearted remark that “classics are those books about which you usually hear people saying ‘I’m rereading… ‘ never ‘I’m reading,'” then goes on to show a contagious passion for great literature of all types. Reading criticism of classics, he writes, is often a waste of time; reading, savoring, and rereading them is of much greater importance. However, many of these critical studies suffer from too much deference to the texts, and too few flights of critical fancy. The high points of the collection are the title essay and longer pieces presenting overviews of the work of great writers who were Calvino’s contemporaries. He begins an engaging discussion of Hemingway (written in 1954) by remarking that there were times when “Hemingway was a god. And they were good times, which I am happy to remember, without even a hint of that ironic indulgence with which we look back on youthful fashions.” His accounts of authors less known to a modern American audience will leave readers eager to sample the otherwise daunting works of Francis Ponge and Eugenio Montale. Still, this collection is on the whole surprisingly lackluster; the beloved postmodernist will ultimately be better remembered for such earlier, more spirited essay collections as The Uses of Literature. (Sept.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Who Is Mark Twain?

SUMMARY: You had better shove this in the stove,” Mark Twain said at the top of an 1865 letter to his brother, “for I don’t want any absurd ‘literary remains’ and ‘unpublished letters of Mark Twain’ published after I am planted.” He was joking, of course. But when Mark Twain died in 1910, he left behind the largest collection of personal papers created by any nineteenth-century American author. Here, for the first time in book form, are twenty-four remarkable pieces by the American master—pieces that have been handpicked by Robert Hirst, general editor of the Mark Twain Project at the University of California, Berkeley. In “Jane Austen,” Twain wonders if Austen’s goal is to “make the reader detest her people up to the middle of the book and like them in the rest of the chapters.” “The Privilege of the Grave” offers a powerful statement about the freedom of speech while “Happy Memories of the Dental Chair” will make you appreciate modern dentistry. In “Frank Fuller and My First New York Lecture” Twain plasters the city with ads to promote his talk at the Cooper Union (he is terrified no one will attend). Later that day, Twain encounters two men gazing at one of his ads. One man says to the other: “Who is Mark Twain?” The other responds: “God knows—I don’t.” Wickedly funny and disarmingly relevant, Who Is Mark Twain? shines a new light on one of America’s most beloved literary icons—a man who was well ahead of his time.

Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
Vanity Fair is the story of Becky Sharp, one of the most beautiful, willful, and resourcefully charming pleasure-seekers in literature. With finishing-school credentials and proper connections, Becky begins as a governess, wins the hearts of the moneyed young and old, and, in the light of presentation at court and calculated scandals, emerges a full-fledged courtesan on the Continent, living surprisingly well beyond her means. Thackeray’s greatest novel is a moral tapestry of early nineteenth-century English manners, and his persistent theme is the folly of the good-at-heart, the evil of those endowed with grace and wit. Anthony Trollope called Thackeray “…one of the recognized stars of the literary heaven.” V.S. Pritchett finds Thackeray “…the first of our novelists to catch life visually and actually as it passes in fragments before us…he is above all a superb impressionist – perhaps our greatest.” With an Afterword by V.S. Pritchett

Untouchable

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Bakha is a young man, proud and even attractive, yet none the less he is an outcast in India’s caste system: an Untouchable. In deceptively simple prose this groundbreaking novel describes a day in the life of Bakha, sweeper and toilet-cleaner, as he searches for a meaning to the tragic existence he has been born into – and comes to an unexpected conclusion. Mulk Raj Anand poured a vitality, fire and richness of detail into his controversial work, which led him to be acclaimed as his country’s Charles Dickens and one of the twentieth century’s most important Indian writers.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

SUMMARY: The classic tale of Captain Nemo and the submarine the Nautilus, this is the quintessential translation by the internationally renowned Verne scholar, William Butcher. This edition of Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea reports the very first study of Verne’s manuscript and is packed with detail on artistic and scientific references.

Timaeus

**Plato’s *Timaeus* is a dialogue by the acclaimed Greek philosopher, wherein Timaeus is engaged by Socrates on a variety of topics.**
Commonly overlooked by scholars until the late Victorian era, this dialog nevertheless represents important developments in Plato’s thought regarding human nature and the physical nature of the world and reality. Today it remains highly considered by scholars in Ancient Greek philosophy, despite the majority of the text being essentially a monologue.
In this dialogue portions, Socrates and Timaeus discuss the nature of the physical world and of reality. The monologue portions are delivered by the titular Timaeus, who expostulates about the nature of the universe and of human existence to a receptive and thoughtful Socrates.
Notably among the chapters is a discussion of the Four Elements which were an important aspect in Greek thinking about the universe. Timaeus puts forward the idea that each element has a specific shape in manifestation – For Fire, a tetrahedron, for Air an Octahedron, for Water an Icosahedron, and for Earth a cube. The significance of the shapes becomes clear: Plato, as Timaeus, proposes they interact with the universe by means of their shape and ratio.
This quality edition was translated by the renowned Oxford scholar of Ancient Greece, Benjamin Jowett.
**