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Troy: Fall of Kings (Troy Trilogy #3)

Darkness falls on the Great Green and the Ancient World is fiercely divided. On the killing fields outside the golden city of Troy, forces loyal to the Mykene King Agamemnon mass. Among them is Odysseus, fabled storyteller and reluctant ally to the Mykene. He knows that Agamemnon will stop at nothing to secure the treasure that lies within the city walls, and he must soon face his former friends in deadly combat. Ailing and bitter, the Trojan king waits. His hope is pinned on two heroes: his favourite son, Hektor, the mightiest warrior of his age, and the dread Helikaon, who will wreak terrible vengeance for the death of his wife at Mykene hands. War has been declared. As enemies, who are also kinsmen, are filled with bloodlust, they know that some of them men and women – will become heroes: heroes who will live for ever in a story that will echo down the centuries.

The Wedding Promise

THE WAY WEST FOR RACHEL SINCLAIR LED STRAIGHT DOWN THE AISLE and into the arms of a man she barely knew! But Cord McPherson had taken her and her brothers in when trouble struck along the trail. And Rachel believed in her heart that this marriage of convenience would grow into a bond more precious than gold.An instant family wasn’t something Cord McPherson had planned on acquiring, but the sight of Rachel protecting her brothers told him she was plenty strong enough to be his bride. And he was good and ready to make their promise to each other last a lifetime.

The Sum of Her Parts

**In this thrilling science fiction adventure—the triumphant conclusion to the Tipping Point trilogy— *New York Times* bestselling author Alan Dean Foster returns to a near future in which genetic manipulation and extreme body modification have changed profoundly what it means to be human.**
****
Dr. Ingrid Seastrom was once a respected American physician. Whispr, whose body has been transformed to preternatural thinness, was once a streetwise thief. Now, in a world on the edge of catastrophe from centuries of environmental exploitation, they are allies—thrust together by fate to unravel an impossible mystery—even as they are stalked by a relentless killer.

Ingrid and Whispr are hunted fugitives bound together by a thread: a data-storage thread made of a material that cannot exist, yet somehow does. Their quest to learn its secrets—and, in Whispr’s case, sell them to the highest bidder—has brought them to South Africa’s treacherous Namib desert. Beyond its dangers waits a heavily guarded research facility that promises answers, if they can survive long enough to get there. But that won’t be easy, not with Napun Molé on their trail. They’ve already escaped the assassin twice, and as far as Molé is concerned, finishing them off isn’t just a job anymore . . . it’s personal.
### From Booklist
Foster has some stylistic tics that make his work a little jarring if you’re not used to it, but in fact he spins a pretty good yarn. This is the third book in a trilogy, set in a future where extreme body mods are common, in which the modded thief Whispr and “natural” Dr. Ingrid Seastrom have made their way to the Namib desert in search of a supersecret installation at Nerens. They’re searching for the origin—and purpose—of the mysterious silver thread, which seems to be some kind of storage device. The trip across the desert is rife with danger: natural threats, the security out of Nerens, and the hired killer who still pursues them. They encounter some surprising allies—including an illegal diamond hunter and a clan of superintelligent meerkats—in their travels, and survive all the desert has to throw at them, only to arrive at a destination neither of them was expecting. The easy flow of Foster’s plotting makes this a fun and undemanding read. –Regina Schroeder
### About the Author
**Alan Dean Foster** has written in a variety of genres, including hard science fiction, fantasy, horror, detective, Western, historical, and contemporary fiction. He is the author of the *New York Times* bestseller *Star Wars: The Approaching Storm* and the popular Pip & Flinx novels; two earlier novels in the Tipping Point trilogy, *The Human Blend* and *Body, Inc.;* and novelizations of several films including *Transformers, Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, Star Wars,* the first three *Alien* films, and *Alien Nation*. His novel *Cyber Way* won the Southwest Book Award for Fiction in 1990, the first science fiction work ever to do so. Foster and his wife, JoAnn Oxley, live in Prescott, Arizona, in a house built of brick that was salvaged from an early-twentieth-century miners’ brothel. He is currently at work on several new novels and media projects.

The Serpent of Venice

*New York Times* bestselling author Christopher Moore channels William Shakespeare and Edgar Allan Poe in this satiric Venetian gothic featuring the irresistibly mischievous Pocket of Dog Snogging, the eponymous hero of *Fool*
Venice, a really long time ago. Three prominent Venetians await their most loathsome and foul dinner guest, the erstwhile envoy from Britain who also happens to be a favorite of the Doge: the rascal-Fool Pocket.
This trio of cunning plotters—the merchant, Antonio; the senator, Montressor Brabantio; and the naval officer, Iago—have lured Pocket to a dark dungeon, promising a spirited evening with a rare Amontillado sherry and a fetching young noblewoman. Their invitation is, of course, bogus. The wine is drugged; the girl is nowhere in sight. These scoundrels have something far less amusing planned for the man who has consistently foiled their quest for power and wealth. But this Fool is no fool . . . and the story is only beginning.
Once again, Christopher Moore delivers a rousing literary satire, a dramedy mash-up rich with delights, including (but not limited to): foul plots, counterplots, true love, jealousy, murder, betrayal, revenge, codpieces, three mysterious locked boxes, a boatload of gold, a pound of flesh, occasional debauchery, and water (lots of water). Not to mention a cast Shakespeare himself would be proud of: Shylock; Iago; Othello; a bunch of other guys whose names end in “o”; a trio of comely wenches—Desdemona, Jessica, Portia; the brilliant Fool; his large sidekick, Drool; Jeff, the pet monkey; a lovesick sea serpent; and a ghost (yes, there’s always a bloody ghost).
Wickedly witty and outrageously inventive, *The Serpent of Venice* pays cheeky homage to the Bard and illuminates the absurdity of the human condition as only Christopher Moore can.

The Saliva Tree

Brian Aldiss marked the centenary year of H G Wells’ birth with this ingenious novella combining comedy, terror and, intriguingly, late nineteenth-century period charm. In a sleepy East Anglian town we meet Bruce Fox and Gregory Rolles – two young men who have sworn to Think Large in order to distinguish themselves from the masses of Cottersall. When a meteor lands in the pond of a local farm, Gregory seeks the advice of Mr Wells. Nine short stories complete the collection, including the highly autobiographical ‘Girl and Robot With Flowers’, which was taken up as a seminal story demarcating the new SF from the old.

The Human Blend

BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Alan Dean Foster’s *Body, Inc.*
**
In this first novel of a thrilling new series set in our near future, *New York Times* bestselling author Alan Dean Foster reveals a place where criminals are punished through genetic engineering and body manipulation—and poses profound questions about what it means to be human.**

Given his name because radical surgery has reduced him to preternatural thinness, Whispr is a thug. In a dark alley in Savannah, Whispr and his partner in crime, Jiminy Cricket, murder what they take to be a random tourist in order to steal his artificial hand. But the victim is also carrying an unusual silver thread, which Whispr and Jiminy grab as well.

Chance later deposits a wounded Whispr at the clinic of Dr. Ingrid Seastrom. Powerful forces have been searching for Whispr since he acquired the mysterious thread, and Jiminy has vanished. All Whispr wants to do is sell the thread, and when he offers to split the profits with Ingrid, she makes an astonishing discovery. So begins the formidable partnership between the Harvard-educated physician and the street-smart thief—as long as they can elude the enhanced assassins that are tracking them.
### About the Author
Alan Dean Foster has written in a variety of genres, including hard science fiction, fantasy, horror, detective, western, historical, and contemporary fiction. He is also the author of numerous nonfiction articles, as well as novel versions of several films, including Star Wars, the first three Alien films, and Alien Nation. His novel Cyber Way won the Southwest Book Award for Fiction, the first science fiction book to ever do so. Alan lives with his wife in Prescott, Arizona. David Colacci has been an actor and a director for over thirty years, performing coast-to-coast in lead roles of plays by a variety of playwrights, from Shakespeare to Sam Shepard to Steve Martin. He has worked as a narrator for over fifteen years, during which time he has read the works of such authors as Jules Verne, Henry Adams, John Irving, Michael Chabon, and John Lescroart. He has won AudioFile Earphones Awards, earned Audie nominations, and been included on Best of Year lists by such publications as Publishers Weekly, AudioFile magazine, and Library Journal. David was a resident actor/director with the Cleveland Play House for eight years and has been artistic director of the Hope Summer Rep Theater since 1992. He currently lives in New York with his wife, narrator and actress Susan Ericksen, and his children, Mario and Elena.
### Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.
1

“Let’s riffle the dead man.” Jiminy scowled at the newly won corpse and hopped to it.

Viewed up close, the freshly demised Meld wasn’t much of a prize–but then, Jiminy Cricket wasn’t much of a thief. Neither was his occasional mudbud Whispr. As Jiminy slipped the still-warm barker back inside his shirt, the two men bent over the motionless middle-aged Meld who’d had the unluck to be singled out as prey. Whispr was relieved the man had finally stopped gasping. In the deceptive calm of the Savannah alley where they had dragged the lumpy body, the dead man’s penultimate air suckling had grown progressively more disconcerting. Now it, and he, were stilled.

Jiminy had not been certain the barker would work as intended. With a slapjob barker you never did know. It was supposed to identify anyone, Meld or Natural, who was burdened with a fib, pump, adjunct, pacemaker, flexstent, or just about any other variety of artificial heart or heart accessory–and at the push of a button, stop it. A barker meted out murder most subtle. More important to the wielder, it imposed death quietly. Once the barker’s short-range scanner had picked the pedestrian out of a late-evening crowd, Whispr and Jiminy had trailed him until the opportunity to stop his heart from a distance and riffle the resulting corpse had presented itself.

Victim and murderers alike were Melds. Jiminy’s legs had been lengthened, modified, and enhanced with nanocarbonic prosthetics that allowed him to cover distances equivalent to obsolete Olympic long jump records in a single bound. Immensely useful for fleeing from pursuers. Awkward if you wanted to buy off-the-rack trousers. Each of his bone-grafted, elongated thighbones was twice the length of those belonging to a Natural of the same height. The high-strength fast-twitch muscle fibers with their bonded protein inserts that wrapped around his leg bones were three times normal thickness while the accompanying tendons had been fashioned from synthetic spider silk.

These melded legs had struck Jiminy with the casually bestowed nickname he had gone ahead and adopted as his own. Ostensibly he was a legitimate messenger, able to leap easily from platform to platform and street to catwalk across the multitude of canals and waterways that now crisscrossed Old Savannah. In actuality, they allowed him to elude all but the most persistent hunter. Evening to early morning was when he practiced his real profession. Was when he made his money resolute. Diurnal messenger boy was his mask, moonlight the chisel that chipped it away.

Unlike his friend who had acceded to a naming by acclimation, Whispr had chosen his own Meld name. His validated moniker was Archibald Kowalski. Everyone in his family had been big–in his family “big” serving as polite synonym for “obese.” Growing up an obese kid was bad. Growing up poor and obese was bad squared. So when the appointed legal hour of adolescence arrived when Archie could choose to stay natural or undergo his first legal meld, he chose to become–slim. Not naturally slim which he could perhaps have accomplished with diet or even unpretentious traditional surgery, but unnaturally slim. Meld-slim.

Set beside the grand majority of complex meld surgeries, his was comparatively simple. They removed half his stomach and the majority of his intestines. In their place were inserted a fuel cell-powered post-digestive NEM (nutrient extractor and maximizer) that drew its energy from the fortified liquids he drank. It was complemented by a compact prefood processor. Nothing custom was required–all were straight off-the-line components. They had to be. Even with the first-meld loan he took out to pay for them he couldn’t afford anything fancier.

Since then, with the money he and Jiminy had aggrandized through their after-hours activities, Archie had been able to add more personalized bioganic components to the humeld that was himself. A carbo squeezer, muscle assists, and most significantly a full course of bone aeration treatments. The result was that while he stood nearly six feet tall and weighed less than a hundred pounds, he was according to all tests and measures perfectly healthy, from his heart rate to his skin color. A bonus accruing from his chosen meld was that his cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lower than a mudpuppy’s pooper. He and his whip-thin silhouette were nothing exceptional. Not when compared to the average Meld–far less when set beside one who was exceedingly customized.

He could slip through spaces between buildings where the police could not follow and enter openings too tight or narrow for more intelligent but less willowy thieves. Due to his everlastingly abridged weight he walked in a permanent hush. This practice of making airfalls instead of footfalls had led to him choosing the Meld name Whispr. But unlike Jiminy he had not had it wholly transliterated to his national ident. The census still knew him as Archibald Kowalski. Only friends and fences were acquainted with him as Whispr.

He and Jiminy had not singled out the unaccompanied pedestrian for the man’s heartparts. Heart components were as common as–well, as melds. Perversely, what had drawn their attention was the man’s left hand. With the face of its deceased owner smudging the alley’s old brick paving, Whispr was able to admire the hand more fully as his partner extracted a compact set of decoupling tools from inside his copious shirt and began the process of ampuscation. Beyond the scene of the crim out on the one-way street an occasional electric vehicle, little noisier than Whispr himself, hummed along on its predetermined path as its passengers toured the city’s historical district.

In a time of rising sea levels the blocks of old buildings, warehouses, and stately homes had turned out to be easier to preserve than the natural vegetation among which they had risen. Unlike much of the native flora that dominated the low-lying east coast of the old United States, standing cypress had no problem coping with the rising water that had inundated much of the old city. But most of the other trees and bushes needed a good deal of tender loving care to ensure their continuing survival. In the historical district entire blocks had been razed repeatedly and entirely. As with similar localities deemed worthy of preservation in Charleston, Port Royal, and all the way down to Jacksonville, they had eventually been placed on hydraulic platforms. So Old Savannah still looked remarkably as it had in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, except that the warm Atlantic shallows now flowed sleepily beneath the power stilts that kept the historical city high and dry.

The old town was always full of tourists. Tourists being always full of credit cards and other instruments of financial transfer as well as marketable swag and viable body parts, it was where Whispr and Jiminy preferred to hang out after leaving their day jobs–and scan for quarry.

Working swift and efficient with the gear from the tidy tool kit, Whispr’s mudbud already had the hand half detached. Though his fingers were natural and unmelded, Jiminy was good with them. While his friend toiled, Whispr occupied himself keeping an eye on the distant street traffic and riffling the dead man’s pockets, taking time to look for any hidden antitheft compartments that might have been sewn or welded into the fabric. To his surprise he located the man’s wallet lying loose and unsecured in a front pocket. Such casual indifference to personal safekeeping pointed to a criminal neglect of personal protective measures. Or worse, the possibility that the wallet held nothing filchworthy. On the other hand there was the hand, whose construction suggested that its owner was a man of means, or at least had access to substantial resources.

Peering close he could see that the meld component his partner was carefully removing was an exquisite piece of work. Navahopi craftsmanship, perhaps. Or if it was an import, maybe Russian or Israelistinian. When one revelation after another came to light their excitement and expectations increased proportionately. As Jiminy’s work progressed, however, Whispr found his early enthusiasm giving way in his half stomach to a slow curdling of his dinner. It was becoming increasingly clear that what the Cricket was ampuscating was no ordinary meld accessory. This fertilized the rising suspicion that the evening’s prey might be no ordinary tourist.

Maybe sufficiently unordinary that others might come looking for him.

When the manifold processes of triple-R (Repair, Replace, and Regeneration) had first become cheap and widely available, people had opted for the best exterior matches to their truborn selves. It was only later, when flaunting one’s Meldness had become not only socially acceptable but trendy, that such additional cosmetic expense had proven itself unnecessary. The prevailing sentiment became the same as that espoused by purchasers of costly private vehicles or fine jewelry. If you could afford an expensive bodily accessory, why not show it off? What was the difference between a tattoo and a blue you? So the titanium weave and carbonic fibers of the dead man’s prosthetic hand glimmered in the dim light that infused the alley unencumbered by the ancestral wistfulness of human skin.

It was work as fine and precise as Whispr had ever seen. The bonding of metal and carbon fiber to wrist bone, tendons, and muscles was seamless. It was impossible to tell where organics ceased and modifications commenced. In addition to permitting basic grasping, each finger had been further customized to perform a different task, from airscribing to communications. The hand of the dead man had been turned into a veritable five-digited portable office.

Jiminy was all but cackling to himself as he strove to finish detaching the piece from its owner. “Swart-breath, this is terrific stuff! Must’ve cost tens of thousands to compile and append. Swallower will give us six months subsist for it.” He leaned into his work. A surgically equipped Meld or even a Natural wou…

The Dark Light Years

The Utods are a highly advanced alien species from whom the human race might learn much, with superior technology and a profound philosophy. But when they meet, their customs and conventions are far beneath what humankind considers to be civilized. Brian Aldiss’s satirical depiction of the first encounter and subsequent violent conflict between mankind and a gentle, intelligent race which it cannot understand was first published in 1964, but its archly ironic message of cultural misunderstanding and the potential for catastrophe it entails resonates as strongly today. ‘Flies straight to its mark with hardly a word wasted: a treat for the fans and required reading for anyone seriously interested in the fiction and ideas of today.’ Kingsley Amis
### About the Author
Brian Aldiss, born in 1925, is one of the most prolific authors of both general and science fiction. In a writing career stretching from 1955 to the present he has published over seventy books. He has also been an influential compiler of science fiction anthologies. A Science Fiction Omnibus is available as a Penguin Modern Classic. Faber have reissued six of his best science fiction titles: Earthworks, Cryptozoic!, Barefoot in the Head, Galaxies like Grains of Sand, The Dark Light Years and The Shape of Further Things.

Night Angel: The Complete Trilogy

**From *NYT* bestselling author Brent Weeks comes his breakout fantasy trilogy in which a young boy trains under the city’s most legendary and feared assassin Durzo Blint. **
For Durzo Blint, assassination is an art – and he is the city’s most accomplished artist.
For Azoth, survival is just the beginning. He was raised on the streets and knows an opportunity when he sees one – even when the risks are as high as working for someone like Durzo Blint.
Azoth must learn to navigate the assassins’ world of dangerous politics and strange magics – and become the perfect killer.
**Devour this blockbuster tale of assassination and magic by *New York Times* bestselling author, Brent Weeks, which has delighted readers all over the world–with over one million copies in print! *****
**
* ** Included in this omnibus edition:**
*The Way of Shadows*
*Shadow’s Edge*
*Beyond the Shadows*
* *For more from Brent Weeks, check out:

**Lightbringer**
*The Black Prism*
*The Blinding Knife*
*The Broken Eye*
*The Blood Mirror
The Burning White
* **

Netherland

### Amazon.com Review
**Amazon Exclusive: A Q &A with Joseph O’Neill**
**Joseph O’Neill was born in Ireland and raised in Holland. He received a law degree from Cambridge University and worked as a barrister in London. He writes regularly for *The Atlantic Monthly* and is the author of two previous novels, *New York Times* Notable Book. O’Neill received the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction for his third novel, *Netherland*. He lives with his family in New York City.**
**Question:** President Obama mentioned in a *New York Times Magazine* profile that he’s reading *Netherland*. How do you feel about the President reading your book?
**Joseph O’Neill:** I’m very honored, of course.
**Question:** How is the world of *Netherland* particular to the United States after 9/11?
**Joseph O’Neill:** The story takes place in the aftermath of 9/11. One of the things it does is try to evoke the disorientation and darkness of that time, which we only emerged from with the election of President Obama.
**Question:** What is the importance of the sport of cricket in this book? Do you play?
**Joseph O’Neill:** I love sport and play cricket and golf myself. Sport is a wonderful way to bring together people who would otherwise have no connection to each other.
**Question:** One of your reviewers calls *Netherland* an answer to
**Joseph O’Neill:** Halfway through the book I realized with a slightly sinking feeling that the plot of *Netherland* was eerily reminiscent of the *Gatsby* plot: dreamer drowns, bystander remembers. But there are only about 5 plots in existence, so I didn’t let it bother me too much. Fitzgerald thankfully steered clear of cricket.
**Question:** Many reviewers have commented on the “voice” of this novel. How it is more a novel of voice than of plot? Do you agree with this?
**Joseph O’Neill:** Yes, I would agree with that comment. This is not a novel of eventful twists and turns. It is more like a long-form international cricket match (which can last for 5 days without a winner emerging), about nuance and ambiguity and small slippages of insight. And about language, of course.
(Photo © Lisa Acherman)
### From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Hans van den Broek, the Dutch-born narrator of O’Neill’s dense, intelligent novel, observes of his friend, Chuck Ramkissoon, a self-mythologizing entrepreneur-gangster, that he never quite believed that people would sooner not have their understanding of the world blown up, even by Chuck Ramkissoon. The image of one’s understanding of the world being blown up is poignant—this is Hans’s fate after 9/11. He and wife Rachel abandon their downtown loft, and, soon, Rachel leaves him behind at their temporary residence, the Chelsea Hotel, taking their son, Jake, back to London. Hans, an equities analyst, is at loose ends without Rachel, and in the two years he remains Rachel-less in New York City, he gets swept up by Chuck, a Trinidadian expatriate Hans meets at a cricket match. Chuck’s dream is to build a cricket stadium in Brooklyn; in the meantime, he operates as a factotum for a Russian gangster. The unlikely (and doomed from the novel’s outset) friendship rises and falls in tandem with Hans’s marriage, which falls and then, gradually, rises again. O’Neill (_This Is the Life_) offers an outsider’s view of New York bursting with wisdom, authenticity and a sobering jolt of realism. *(May)*
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

March to the Stars

Another Sunny Day on Marduk

Roger Ramius Sergei Alexander Chiang MacClintock has had a really bad year.

Bad enough to be the spoiled rotten fop of a prince no one wanted or trusted.

Worse to be sent off on a meaningless diplomatic mission, simply to get you out from underfoot, with a bodyguard of Marines who loathe and despise you.

Worse yet to be assumed dead and marooned for almost a year on a hell-hole planet while you and those same Marines fight your way through carnivorous beasts, murderous natives, and perpetual rain to the only starport. . . which is controlled by the Empire’s worst enemies.

Worst of all to have discovered that you were born to be a warrior prince. One whose bodyguards have learned the same lesson. And one haunted by the deaths of almost a hundred of your Marines… for what you know now was an unnecessary exercise in political expediency.

A warrior prince who wants to have a few choice words with your Lady Mother, the Empress of Man.

But to have them, you, your surviving Marines, and your Mardukan allies must cross a demon-haunted ocean, face a civilization that is “civilized” in name alone and “barbarians” who may not be exactly what they seem, and once again battle against impossible odds. All so that you can attempt to somehow seize a heavily defended spaceport and hijack a starship to take you home.

Yet what neither Roger, nor the Marines, nor his allies know is that the battle to leave Marduk is only the beginning. And that words with Roger’s mother will be hard to come by.

But that’s all right. Because what the Galaxy doesn’t know is that it’s about to receive a fresh proof of an old truism:

You don’t mess with a MacClintock.

At the publisher’s request, this title is sold without DRM (Digital Rights Management).

Love and Friendship

A juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790, when Austen was 14 years old. Written in epistolary form, like her later unpublished novella, Lady Susan, it is likely one of the tales she wrote for the amusement of her family. The installments, written as letters from the heroine Laura, to Marianne, the daughter of her friend, Isabel, “La Comtesse de Feullide,” may have come about as nightly readings by the young Jane in the Austen home. Love and Freindship (the misspelling is one of many in the story) is clearly a parody of romantic novels Austen read as a child. This is clear even from the subtitle, “Deceived in Freindship and Betrayed in Love,” which totally undercuts the title.

Leaping to the Stars

### Amazon.com Review
This satisfying conclusion to David Gerrold’s
This is a young adult novel that older adults will also find appealing. Charles is an engaging and sympathetic adolescent science fiction hero–smart, prickly, wrestling with hard lessons in adult responsibility. Readers new to the series should be patient: backstory is revealed gradually, so as not to interrupt the smooth mix of action and the scientific, philosophical, and religious questions that propel this thoughtful coming-of-age story. *–Roz Genessee*
### From Publishers Weekly
Fans of Heinlein’s trademark blend of space-bound high adventure and serious political philosophy will feel right at home in the third and final book of Gerrold’s series (Jumping Off the Planet; Bouncing Off the Moon) detailing the adventures of 13-year-old Charles “Chigger” Dingillian and his family as they seek a place to call home. On the moon, Charles’s HARLIE unit, an advanced artificial intelligence device packed into the body of a monkey, is coveted by Lunar Authority as well as by the revolutionaries who seek to overthrow it. The only option left for escaping these forces is to sign on as colonists bound for Outbeyond, Earth’s most distant colony, where the only surety is a life of backbreaking labor but also the chance to finally be free. Once the colony ship Cascade has set off, however, nothing goes smoothly. The colonists, particularly Charles’s divorced parents and two brothers, face pressure from Revelationists, a fundamentalist group traveling aboard the Cascade to their own colony on the way to Outbeyond. The Revelationists believe HARLIE is evil and must be destroyed, along with those who possess it and the Dingillians are at the top of the list. If that isn’t enough, Charles has his own growing uncertainty about HARLIE’s motives. Those new to the series will find the opening tough to follow, but through his engaging adolescent narrator, Gerrold gradually provides enough backstory to clarify without slowing down the action. The appeal to YA readers is obvious, but plenty of adults are also sure to enjoy this thoughtful adventure. (Mar. 15)”The Trouble with Tribbles.”
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Ironhand’s Daughter

The armies of the Outlanders crushed the highlanders at the battle of Colden Moor–killing their finest warriors and breaking their freeborn spirit. The highlanders are now a conquered people, ruled by the brutal Baron Gottasson.
Prophecies speak of the coming of a new leader, a descendent of Ironhand, mightiest of the highland kings. A leader who will throw off the Outlander yoke. But only one highlander carries the blood of Ironhand: Sigarni, a wild and willful teenage girl who cares for nothing save her own concerns. Until a fateful encounter thrusts her onto a path of rebellion. Now, hunted by the baron’s soldiers and stalked by an evil sorcerer, Sigarni will be forced to fulfill her destiny . . . or perish.

From the Paperback edition.

Georgia on My Mind and Other Places

**INCLUDES THE NEBULA & HUGO WINNING NOVELETTE** “Sheffield, a physicist, proves to be one of the most imaginative, exciting talents to appear on the SF scene in recent years.”-Publishers Weekly **A collection of some of the finest short stories penned by a master of hard science fiction, this anthology includes Charles Sheffield’s highly acclaimed novelette, Georgia On My Mind. **Georgia On My Mind won both the Hugo and Nebula when originally published in 1993. The accompanying stories were written by the author between 1987 and 1994.

Drowning World

### From Publishers Weekly
Bestseller Foster’s latest Commonwealth novel (Diuturnity’s Dawn, etc.) offers the kind of sure-fire entertainment that keeps his fans coming back for more. On the distant planet Fluva, torrential rains that leave it barely habitable also make it a treasure trove of rare botanical specimens. When the human prospector Shadrach Hasselemoga crashes in a remote area, the only crew available to search for him is the warrior Jemunu-jah, one of the native Sakuntala, and the immigrant Deyzara trader, Masurathoo. This exceedingly odd couple-culturally different and physically repulsive to each other-promptly crash also. While the rescuers and the rescued are all slogging it out of the ultimate rain forest, the reptilian AAn empire is fomenting bloody trouble between the Sakuntula and the Deyzara. This leaves Commonwealth administrator Lauren Matthias in the hot seat, with refugees swarming in to her limited facilities and the bodies of the innocent piling up, with few resources to help. But it’s the survivors of the rain forest who bring new knowledge that helps save Fluva, along with quick work by Matthias. The human characters are notably less developed than the aliens, and the AAn Empire is something of a straw foe these days, but the author’s mastery of his exotic setting cannot be denied.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.
### From Library Journal
This “world” is actually a rain-drenched planet at the edge of the Commonwealth that is loaded with valuable botanicalsDand ravenous plants and animals.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.