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With Friends Like These

Have you ever been a less than perfect friend? To whom does your first loyalty belong your best friend or your husband? With her trademark wit and empathy, Sally Koslow explores the entangled lives of women in this candid, fast-paced novel.
Quincy, Talia, Chloe, and Jules met in the early nineties after answering a roommate ad for a Manhattan apartment. Despite having little in common, the women became fast friends. A decade later, their lives have diverged, though their ties remain strong.
Quincy, a Midwestern introvert, is trying to overcome a set of tragedies by hunting for the perfect home; Talia, a high-energy Brooklyn wife and mom with an outspoken conscience, is growing resentful of her friends’ greater financial stability and her husband’s lack of ambition; timid Chloe, also a mother, is trying to deflect pressure from her husband, a hedge fund manager, to play the role of trophy wife; while Jules, a fiercely independent actress/entrepreneur with a wicked set of life rules, is confronting her forties alone.
When Jules gives her new boyfriend the inside scoop on the real estate gem Quincy is lusting after, and Talia chases a lucrative job earmarked for Chloe, the women are forced to wrestle with the challenges of love and motherhood. Will their friendships and marriages survive? And at what price? Punchy yet tender, a high-five to sisterhood, this book will hit an emotional bull’s-eye for anyone who has had or been less than a perfect friend.

The Wishing Trees

Almost a year after the death of his wife, former high-tech executive Ian finds a letter that will change his life. It contains Kate’s final wish-a plea for him to take their ten-year-old daughter, Mattie, on a trip across Asia, through the countries they had always planned to visit. Eager to honor the woman they loved, Ian and Mattie embark on an epic journey, leaving notes to Kate in “wishing trees” along the way, and encountering miracles large and small. And as they begin to find their way back to each other, they discover that healing is possible and love endures-lessons that Kate hoped to show them all along…
**
### Recensione
“John Shors’ *The Wishing Tree* is an affecting and sensitively rendered study of grief and loss, the healing power of artistic expression, and the life- altering rewards of travel to distant lands. I was deeply moved by this poignant and life-affirming novel.”
-Wally Lamb, author of *She’s Come Undone* and *Wishin’ and Hopin’*
### Sinossi
Almost a year after the death of his wife, former high-tech executive Ian finds a letter that will change his life. It contains Kate’s final wish-a plea for him to take their ten-year-old daughter, Mattie, on a trip across Asia, through the countries they had always planned to visit. Eager to honor the woman they loved, Ian and Mattie embark on an epic journey, leaving notes to Kate in “wishing trees” along the way, and encountering miracles large and small. And as they begin to find their way back to each other, they discover that healing is possible and love endures-lessons that Kate hoped to show them all along…

Winter Garden

EDITORIAL REVIEW: ***Can a woman ever really know herself if she doesn’t know her mother? From the author of the smash-hit bestseller *Firefly Lane *and *True Colors *comes a powerful, heartbreaking novel that illuminates the intricate mother-daughter bond and explores the enduring links between the present and the past ***Meredith and Nina Whitson are as different as sisters can be. One stayed at home to raise her children and manage the family apple orchard; the other followed a dream and traveled the world to become a famous photojournalist. But when their beloved father falls ill, Meredith and Nina find themselves together again, standing alongside their cold, disapproving mother, Anya, who even now, offers no comfort to her daughters. As children, the only connection between them was the Russian fairy tale Anya sometimes told the girls at night. On his deathbed, their father extracts a promise from the women in his life: the fairy tale will be told one last time—and all the way to the end. Thus begins an unexpected journey into the truth of Anya’s life in war-torn Leningrad, more than five decades ago. Alternating between the past and present, Meredith and Nina will finally hear the singular, harrowing story of their mother’s life, and what they learn is a secret so terrible and terrifying that it will shake the very foundation of their family and change who they believe they are.

When Good Friends Go Bad

SUMMARY: For years Jackie, Georgina, Meg and Rowan were loyal friends. But time, secrets and misunderstandings created a rift that seemed impossible to bridge. Ten years after leaving school they attempt a reunion. But Rowan never appears, Georgina has a surprise none of them could have expected, Meg is typically outlandish and Jackie’s heart just isn’t in it. The evening is a fiasco and Jackie decides it’s time to move on once and for all. And that’s just what she does for the following ten years. That is until yesterday, when out of the blue she’s contacted by Meg. But her timing couldn’t be worse as Jackie’s personal life is in tatters and the last thing she’s ready to do is revisit her past.

What Is the What: The Autobiography of Valentino Achak Deng

EDITORIAL REVIEW: ***New York Times Notable Book New York Times Bestseller****What Is the What*** is the epic novel based on the life of Valentino Achak Deng who, along with thousands of other children —the so-called Lost Boys—was forced to leave his village in Sudan at the age of seven and trek hundreds of miles by foot, pursued by militias, government bombers, and wild animals, crossing the deserts of three countries to find freedom. When he finally is resettled in the United States, he finds a life full of promise, but also heartache and myriad new challenges. Moving, suspenseful, and unexpectedly funny, **What Is the What** is an astonishing novel that illuminates the lives of millions through one extraordinary man.

Villain

A young insurance saleswoman is found strangled at Mitsuse Pass. Her family and friends are shocked and terrified. The pass—which tunnels through a mountainous region of southern Japan—has an eerie history: a hideout for robbers, murderers, and ghostly creatures lurking at night.

Soon afterward, a young construction worker becomes the primary suspect. As the investigation unfolds, the events leading up to the murder come darkly into focus, revealing a troubled cast of characters: the victim, Yoshino, a woman much too eager for acceptance; the suspect, Yuichi, a car enthusiast misunderstood by everyone around him; the victim’s middle-aged father, a barber disappointed with his life; and the suspect’s aging grandmother, who survived the starvation of postwar Japan only to be tormented by local gangsters. And, finally, there is desperate Mitsuyo, the lonely woman who finds Yuichi online and makes the big mistake of falling for him.

A stunningly dark thriller and a tapestry of noir, Villain is the English-language debut for Shuichi Yoshida, one of Japan’s most acclaimed and accomplished writers. From desolate seaside towns and lighthouses to love hotels and online chat rooms, Villain reveals the inner lives of men and women who all have something to hide. Part police procedural, part gritty realism, Villain is a coolly seductive story of loneliness and alienation in the southernmost reaches of Japan.
(source: Bol.com)

Vampires

The cult classic is back—for fans who like their vampire hunters hard-boiled.You don’t just kill vampires for the money—you do it for the satisfaction. You do it because somebody has to. You do it no matter what it does to you. And you drink—a lot. Some jobs just suck. This one bites. But nobody does it better than Jack Crow, the leader of VAMPIRE$ Inc. His crack team of hunters takes down the blood suckers with a lethal combination of cojones and crossbows. After members of Jack’s team are ambushed and slaughtered, however, the survivors need to rethink their strategy. With a new recruit from the Vatican— a priest who’s not afraid to wield a stake—and a sharpshooter loaded up with silver bullets, it’s payback time. The only problem is that the vampires have no intention of going down easy. They have their own hit list—and Jack Crow’s name is scrawled in blood right at the top.

Up in the Air

Up in the Air by Walter Kirn
Ryan Bingham’s job as a Career Transition Counselor–he fires people–has kept him airborne for years. Although he has come to despise his line of work, he has come to love the culture of what he calls “Airworld,” finding contentment within pressurized cabins, anonymous hotel rooms, and a wardrobe of wrinkle-free slacks. With a letter of resignation sitting on his boss’s desk, and the hope of a job with a mysterious consulting firm, Ryan Bingham is agonizingly close to his ultimate goal, his Holy Grail: one million frequent flier miles. But before he achieves this long-desired freedom, conditions begin to deteriorate.
With perception, wit, and wisdom, **Up in the Air*** *combines brilliant social observation with an acute sense of the psychic costs of our rootless existence, and confirms Walter Kirn as one of the most savvy chroniclers of American life.

Twitter Wit: Brilliance in 140 Characters Or Less

SUMMARY: New York Magazine proclaims, “Twitter is the hot web company right now…the Next Big Thing;” the New York Times calls it “one of the fastest-growing phenomena on the Internet;” Time magazine claims “Twitter is on its way to becoming the next killer app;” and Newsweek notes that “Suddenly, it seems as though all the world′s a-twitter.” Since its creation in March 2006, Twitter has unleashed a torrent of self-expression from its six million members around the world, who send and read each others′ “tweets,” messages up to 140 characters in length. Friends use the site to make plans; relatives use it to stay connected; politicians use it to lobby for votes; and humorists use it to perfect their craft. In fact, Twitter users have reinvented the classic medium of the witticism in a site where anyone can be a Dorothy Parker or an Oscar Wilde. Twitter Wit is the first compilation of Twitter aphorisms, with submissions ranging from quotidian vignettes like “I bet in Sweden the Ikea instructions are in English” to bumper sticker-type quips like “I think the bird of love is the dove. My husband thinks it′s the swallow,” and contributors ranging from celebrities like Shaquille O′Neal, Jimmy Fallon, Penn Jillette, John Cleese, and Steven Fry to regular people with previously unappreciated sharp tongues. Featuring a foreword by Twitter co-founder Biz Stone, this authorized anthology of the thousand most most clever and memorable “tweets” relates the diversity of human experience in hilarious bite-sized pieces.

Trespass

From the author of The Gustav Sonata In a silent valley in southern France stands an isolated stone farmhouse, the Mas Lunel. Its owner is Aramon Lunel, an alcoholic haunted by his violent past. His sister, Audrun, alone in her bungalow within sight of the Mas Lunel, dreams of exacting retribution for the unspoken betrayals that have blighted her life. Into this closed world comes Anthony Verey, a wealthy but disillusioned antiques dealer from London seeking to remake his life in France. From the moment he arrives at the Mas Lunel, a frightening and unstoppable series of consequences is set in motion… Over a million Rose Tremain books sold A writer of exceptional talent … Tremain is a writer who understands every emotion’ Independent I There are few writers out there with the dexterity or emotional intelligence to rival that of the great Rose Tremain’ Irish Times Tremain has the painterly genius of an Old Master, and she uses it to stunning effect’ The Times Rose Tremain is one of the very finest British novelists’ Salman Rushdie Tremain is a writer of exemplary vision and particularity. The fictional world is rendered with extraordinary vividness’ Marcel Theroux, Guardian
**Recensie(s)**

Taut …full of suspense…bewitching — Ruth Scurr Observer THRILLING…a terrific book, accomplished in its poised, imaginative storytelling and its vivid, sensual rendering of landscape and character, emotion and memory The Times An intelligent and terrifyingly plausible meditation Sunday Telegraph A sumptuously shaded portrait of a private, lonely place and its stranded people Independent Tremain is a writer of particular elegance and control, and her story unfolds from its arresting first scene to its luminous final image as gracefully as a ballet The Telegraph, Review Magazine
(source: Bol.com)

Think of a Number

SUMMARY: An extraordinary fiction debut, Think of a Number is an exquisitely plotted novel of suspense that grows relentlessly darker and more frightening as its pace accelerates, forcing its deeply troubled characters to moments of startling self-revelation. Arriving in the mail over a period of weeks are taunting letters that end with a simple declaration, “Think of any number…picture it…now see how well I know your secrets.”  Amazingly, those who comply find that the letter writer has predicted their random choice exactly.  For Dave Gurney, just retired as the NYPD’s top homicide investigator and forging a new life with his wife, Madeleine, in upstate New York, the letters are oddities that begin as a diverting puzzle but quickly ignite a massive serial murder investigation. What police are confronted with is a completely baffling killer, one who is fond of rhymes filled with threats and warnings, whose attention to detail is unprecedented, and who has an uncanny knack for disappearing into thin air.  Even more disturbing, the scale of his ambition seems to widen as events unfold. Brought in as an investigative consultant, Dave Gurney soon accomplishes deductive breakthroughs that leave local police in awe.  Yet, even as he matches wits with his seemingly clairvoyant opponent, Gurney’s tragedy-marred past rises up to haunt him, his marriage approaches a dangerous precipice, and finally, a dark, cold fear builds that he’s met an adversary who can’t be stopped. In the end, fighting to keep his bearings amid a whirlwind of menace and destruction, Gurney sees the truth of what he’s become – what we all become when guilty memories fester – and how his wife Madeleine’s clear-eyed advice may be the only answer that makes sense. A work that defies easy labels — at once a propulsive masterpiece of suspense and an absorbing immersion in the lives of characters so real we seem to hear their heartbeats – Think of a Number is a novel you’ll not soon forget.

The Wildwater Walking Club

EDITORIAL REVIEW: “Lively and inspiring!”–*Hartford Courant* “A great feel-good story.”–*Philadelphia Examiner* *Just one step at a time. * After losing her boyfriend and her job in one fell swoop, Noreen finds it hard to know what the next step is–never mind take it. For the first time in a great many years, Noreen has time to herself. So she puts on a new pair of sneakers and a seriously outdated pair of exercise pants, and walks. It isn’t long before she’s joined by neighbors Tess and Rosie, two women as lost as she is. As the Wildwater women walk and talk, and talk and walk, they tally their steps, share their secrets, and begin putting their lives back together. And along the way, they learn what women everywhere are finding out — time flies, and getting fit is actually fun when you’re walking with friends.

The Weight of Silence

EDITORIAL REVIEW: When two seven-year-old girls go missing, all are under suspicion. Calli Clark is a dreamer. A sweet, gentle girl, Callie suffers from selective mutism, brought on by a tragedy she experienced as a toddler. Her mother Antonia tries her best to help, but is confined by marriage to a violent husband. Petra Gregory is Calli’s best friend, her soul mate and her voice. But neither Petra nor Calli have been heard from since their disappearance was discovered. Now Calli and Petra’s families are bound by the question of what has happened to their children. As support turns to suspicion, it seems the answers lie trapped in the silence of unspoken secrets.

The Upside Of Irrationality

EDITORIAL REVIEW: The provocative follow-up to the *New York Times* bestseller *Predictably Irrational* Why can large bonuses make CEOs less productive? How can confusing directions actually help us? Why is revenge so important to us? Why is there such a big difference between what we *think* will make us happy and what *really* makes us happy? In his groundbreaking book *Predictably Irrational*, social scientist Dan Ariely revealed the multiple biases that lead us into making unwise decisions. Now, in *The Upside of Irrationality*, he exposes the surprising negative and positive effects irrationality can have on our lives. Focusing on our behaviors at work and in relationships, he offers new insights and eye-opening truths about what really motivates us on the job, how one unwise action can become a long-term habit, how we learn to love the ones we’re with, and more. Drawing on the same experimental methods that made *Predictably Irrational* one of the most talked-about bestsellers of the past few years, Ariely uses data from his own original and entertaining experiments to draw arresting conclusions about how—and why—we behave the way we do. From our office attitudes, to our romantic relationships, to our search for purpose in life, Ariely explains how to break through our negative patterns of thought and behavior to make better decisions. *The Upside of Irrationality* will change the way we see ourselves at work and at home—and cast our irrational behaviors in a more nuanced light.

The Tower, the Zoo and the Tortoise

EDITORIAL REVIEW: Brimming with charm, sparkling prose and undeniably unique characters, this hilarious novel set in the Tower of London has the transportive qualities and delightful magic of the contemporary classics *Chocolat* and *Amelie*.Balthazar Jones has lived in the Tower of London with his loving wife, Hebe, and his pet, the oldest living tortoise, for the past eight years. That’s right, he is a Beefeater. It’s no easy job navigating the trials and tribulations that come with living and working in the largest tourist attraction in London. The once white-hot flame of Hebe and Balthazar’s love has been snuffed in the few years since their son Milo died, a death for which Balthazar blames himself.When Balthazar is tasked with setting up an elaborate menagerie within the Tower walls to house the many exotic animals gifted to the Queen by foreign dignitaries, life at the Tower gets all the more interesting. Penguins escape, a bearded pig goes missing, giraffes are stolen, the komodo dragon sends innocent people running for their lives, and canaries suffer fainting fits. As he attempts to cope with this four-legged invasion and his marriage continues to crumble, Balthazar must confront the secret he has been harbouring about his son’s death, if he wants to save his marriage and his sanity.**CAST OF CHARACTERS****Balthazar Jones**: Beefeater, overseer of the Tower’s royal menagerie, father to Milo, and collector of rain **Hebe Jones**: Balthazar’s wife who works at London Underground’s Lost Property Office **Mrs. Cook:** Balthazar and Hebe’s 180 + year-old tortoise – the oldest tortoise in the world **Arthur Catnip**: London Underground ticket inspector of limited height **Rev. Septimus Drew**: Tower chaplain who writes forbidden prose and pines for one of the residents **Ruby Dore**: Barmaid at the Tower’s Rack & Ruin pub who has a secret **Valerie Jennings**: Hebe’s eccentric colleague who falls for someone of limited height **The Ravenmaster**: Philandering Beefeater who looks after the Tower’s ravens **Sir Walter Raleigh**: Former Tower prisoner and its most troublesome ghost **Chief Yeoman Warder**: Suspicious head Beefeater **Oswin Fielding**: Equerry to The Queen **Samuel Crapper**: Lost Property Office’s most frequent customer **Yeoman Gaoler**: Deputy to the Chief Yeoman Warder who is terrorized by ghostly poetry at night

The Toss of a Lemon

SUMMARY: Sivakami was married at ten, widowed at eighteen, and left with two children. According to the dictates of her caste, her head is shaved and she puts on widow’s whites. From dawn to dusk, she is not allowed to contaminate herself with human touch, not even to comfort her small children. Sivakami dutifully follows custom, except for one defiant act: She moves back to her dead husband’s house to raise her children. There, her servant Muchami, a closeted gay man who is bound by a different caste’s rules, becomes her public face. Their singular relationship holds three generations of the family together through the turbulent first half of the twentieth century, as India endures great social and political change. But as time passes, the family changes, too; Sivakami’s son will question the strictures of the very beliefs that his mother has scrupulously upheld.  The Toss of a Lemon is heartbreaking and exhilarating, profoundly exotic yet utterly recognizable in evoking the tensions that change brings to every family.