1–16 di 265 risultati

Satantango

**At long last, twenty-five years after the Hungarian genius L aszlo Krasznahorkai burst onto the scene with his first novel, *Satantango* dances into English in a beautiful translation by George Szirtes.**
Already famous as the inspiration for the filmmaker Bela Tarr’s six-hour masterpiece, *Satantango* is proof, as the spellbinding, bleak, and hauntingly beautiful book has it, that ‘the devil has all the good times.’
The story of *Satantango* , spread over a couple of days of endless rain, focuses on the dozen remaining inhabitants of an unnamed isolated hamlet: failures stuck in the middle of nowhere. Schemes, crimes, infidelities, hopes of escape, and above all trust and its constant betrayal are Krasznahorkai’s meat. ‘At the center of *Satantango* ,’ George Szirtes has said, ‘is the eponymous drunken dance, referred to here sometimes as a tango and sometimes as a csardas. It takes place at the local inn where everyone is drunk. . . . Their world is rough and ready, lost somewhere between the comic and tragic, in one small insignificant corner of the cosmos. Theirs is the dance of death.’
‘You know,’ Mrs. Schmidt, a pivotal character, tipsily confides, ‘dance is my one weakness.’

Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories

Problem at Pollensa Bay – Parker Pyne
The Second Gong – Poirot
Yellow Iris – Poirot
The Harlequin Tea Set – Harley Quin
The Regatta Mystery – Parker Pyne
The Love Detectives – Harley Quin
Next To A Dog – Romance
Magnolia Blossom – Romance

Père Goriot

The text is accompanied by an introduction, textual annotations by the editor, and a map of Paris. “Responses: Contemporaries and Other Novelists” illustrates Balzac’s immense influence on other writers, among them Charles Baudelaire, Hippolyte Taine, ?mile Zola, and Marcel Proust. “Twentieth-Century Criticism” presents a superb selection of critical writing about the novel. The critics include Ernst Robert Curtius, Albert B?guin, Erich Auerback, Georges Poulet, Michel Butor, Louis Chevalier, Pierre Barb?ris, Peter Brooks, Sandy Petrey, Nicole Mozet, and Janet L. Beizer.

Musashi

Agli inizi del Seicento in Giappone, durante l’età feudale, il giovane Miyamoto Musashi sogna di diventare un samurai. Inizia così un lungo e solitario addestramento per percorrere l’eterna “via del samurai”. Rinuncia a tutti i suoi averi, fisici e sentimentali, per seguire una strada impervia, in continua lotta con le sue debolezze. Dopo numerose peripezie, diventerà il più grande eroe popolare del suo Paese. Yoshikawa seleziona personaggi realmente esistiti per modellarli a suo piacimento, immergendoli in vicende in parte storiche e in parte rivisitate: ne emerge così una trama capace di esprimere perfettamente l’ideale di vita del “ronin” più famoso di tutti i tempi.Un’epopea di avventure appassionanti, che offre uno squarcio sulla Storia e racconta dell’epica eroica che permea ancora oggi la cultura giapponese.

Make Room! Make Room!

A gangster is murdered during a blistering Manhattan heat wave. City cop Andy Rusch is under pressure solve the crime and captivated by the victim’s beautiful girlfriend. But it is difficult to catch a killer, let alone get the girl, in crazy streets crammed full of people. The planet’s population has exploded. The 35 million inhabitants of New York City run their TVs off pedal power, riot for water, loot and trample for lentil ‘steaks’ and are controlled by sinister barbed wire dropped from the sky.
Written in 1966 and set in 1999, *Make Room! Make Room!* is a witty and unnerving story about stretching the earth’s resources, and the human spirit, to breaking point.

Botchan

**A modern classic in Japan on par with *The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn* or *The Catcher in the Rye, Botchan* is a very popular Japanese novel and still widely read decades after its first publication.**
*Botchan* , a timeless Japanese novel written by Japan’s most beloved novelist, Soseki Natsume, is now available in a revised edition featuring a new foreword by Dennis Washburn, Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Languages at Dartmouth College. Prof. Washburn’s foreword places the importance of both the author and the book into perspective for the modern reader.
Botchan’s story is a familiar one: the youngest son in a middle-class Tokyo family, he is consistently in the shadow of his elder brother. With a practically nonexistent relationship with his family, Botchan finds himself cast adrift after both his parents die. Now on his own, Botchan drifts through college only to find himself thrust into a teaching job in the unfamiliar realm of a country school, far from Tokyo and the life he has known. Botchan’s difficulty adjusting to his new life is eloquently described, from his nosy landlord to his students, who delight in tormenting the newcomer from the big city.
Through it all, Botchen’s life is threaded with his vacillating concern for Kiyo, the family servant he left behind who was the only person to give him love and understanding in his life. Regardless of where he goes or what he does, he is always trying to apply the lessons she taught him to his life.

Birdy

Adapted by MacArthur “Genius” Grant winner Naomi Wallace from the acclaimed 1978 novel by William Wharton, BIRDY tells the story of a man undone by the horrors of World War II and the friend who tries to guide him back to earth. “This is the story of two working-class boyhood friends, the earthy Al and the aptly nicknamed Birdy, who is obsessed with birds: He accumulates and tries to emulate them, talks to them, even has a sort of love affair with one of them, and attempts by various outlandish and often perilous means – including weird wings made mostly of tin – to replicate their flight. Girls, despite Al’s suasions, do not interest Birdy. Now, at the conclusion of World War II, both guys are wounded: Sergeant Al physically, with a shattered jaw for which his face is bandaged; Private Birdy psychically, retreating into the squatting posture of an unfledged bird and espousing an obstinate mutism. Birdy’s medical officer in a Kentucky military hospital, Major White, has Al transferred there, in the hope that he may coax his old chum back to normality. The play shuttles between boyhood adventures and misadventures in which Birdy tries to take wing, and hospital scenes in which he cowers speechless with a haunted stare, while Al, when not being hectored by White, strives desperately to animate his unresponsive friend. The way the play moves backward and forward in time, but turns space into a superimposition comprising both past and present, is quite ingenious and … allows six good actors to strut their wares.” -New York Magazine “Adaptor Naomi Wallace remains faithful to the book’s World War II setting and concentrates on the puzzled homoeroticism of the relationship between the central duo, Al and Birdy. This reaches its peak when the latter – locked in a mental hospital, imagining himself to be a bird – silently demands to be fed avian-style from Al’s mouth, leading to the most disturbing male-to-male kiss many of us are ever likely to see on stage.” -The Financial Times (London)

Three Japanese Short Stories

‘Oh the cruelty of time, that destroys all things!’
Beguiling, strange and hair-raising tales from early 20th century Japan: Nagai’s Behind the Prison, Uno’s Closet LLB and Akutagawa’s deeply macabre General Kim.
Penguin Modern: fifty new books celebrating the pioneering spirit of the iconic Penguin Modern Classics series, with each one offering a concentrated hit of its contemporary, international flavour. Here are authors ranging from Kathy Acker to James Baldwin, Truman Capote to Stanislaw Lem and George Orwell to Shirley Jackson; essays radical and inspiring; poems moving and disturbing; stories surreal and fabulous; taking us from the deep South to modern Japan, New York’s underground scene to the farthest reaches of outer space.

The Fate of Rome

**A sweeping new history of how climate change and disease helped bring down the Roman Empire**
Here is the monumental retelling of one of the most consequential chapters of human history: the fall of the Roman Empire. *The Fate of Rome* is the first book to examine the catastrophic role that climate change and infectious diseases played in the collapse of Rome’s power–a story of nature’s triumph over human ambition.
Interweaving a grand historical narrative with cutting-edge climate science and genetic discoveries, Kyle Harper traces how the fate of Rome was decided not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria. He takes readers from Rome’s pinnacle in the second century, when the empire seemed an invincible superpower, to its unraveling by the seventh century, when Rome was politically fragmented and materially depleted. Harper describes how the Romans were resilient in the face of enormous environmental stress, until the besieged empire could no longer withstand the combined challenges of a “little ice age” and recurrent outbreaks of bubonic plague.
A poignant reflection on humanity’s intimate relationship with the environment, *The Fate of Rome* provides a sweeping account of how one of history’s greatest civilizations encountered and endured, yet ultimately succumbed to the cumulative burden of nature’s violence. The example of Rome is a timely reminder that climate change and germ evolution have shaped the world we inhabit–in ways that are surprising and profound.

Cosmos

**RETURNING TO TELEVISION AS AN ALL-NEW MINISERIES ON FOX**
*Cosmos* is one of the bestselling science books of all time. In clear-eyed prose, Sagan reveals a jewel-like blue world inhabited by a life form that is just beginning to discover its own identity and to venture into the vast ocean of space. Featuring a new Introduction by Sagan’s collaborator, Ann Druyan, full color illustrations, and a new Foreword by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, *Cosmos* retraces the fourteen billion years of cosmic evolution that have transformed matter into consciousness, exploring such topics as the origin of life, the human brain, Egyptian hieroglyphics, spacecraft missions, the death of the Sun, the evolution of galaxies, and the forces and individuals who helped to shape modern science.
**Praise for *Cosmos ** *

“Magnificent . . . With a lyrical literary style, and a range that touches almost all aspects of human knowledge, * Cosmos* often seems too good to be true.” **— *The Plain Dealer ** *

“Sagan is an astronomer with one eye on the stars, another on history, and a third—his mind’s—on the human condition.” **—* Newsday***

“Brilliant in its scope and provocative in its suggestions . . . shimmers with a sense of wonder.” **— *The Miami Herald ** *

“Sagan dazzles the mind with the miracle of our survival, framed by the stately galaxies of space.” **—* Cosmopolitan***

“Enticing . . . iridescent . . . imaginatively illustrated.” **— *The New York Times Book Review** ** *

The Captain of the Polestar and Other Tales

This early work by Arthur Conan Doyle was originally published in 1890 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1859. It was between 1876 and 1881, while studying medicine at the University of Edinburgh, that he began writing short stories, and his first piece was published in Chambers’s Edinburgh Journal before he was 20. In 1887, Conan Doyle’s first significant work, A Study in Scarlet, appeared in Beeton’s Christmas Annual. It featured the first appearance of detective Sherlock Holmes, the protagonist who was to eventually make Conan Doyle’s reputation. A prolific writer, Conan Doyle continued to produce a range of fictional works over the following years. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Black Maria

On the surface, Aunt Maria seems like a cuddly old lady, all chit-chat and lace doilies and unadulterated NICEness!
When Mig and her family go for a short visit, they soon learn that Aunt Maria rules the place with a rod of sweetness that’s tougher than iron and deadlier than poison. Life revolves around tea parties, while the men are all grey-suited zombies who fade into the background, and the other children seem like clones.
The short visit becomes a long stay, and when all talk of going home ceases, Mig despairs! Things go from bad to worse when Mig’s brother Chris tries to rebel, but is changed into a wolf .
Mig is convinced that Aunt Maria must be a witch – but who will believe her? It’s up to Mig to figure out what’s going on. Maybe the ghost who haunts the downstairs bedroom holds the key?

Animal Farm

The animals on Mr. Jones’ farm revolt against their human masters and violently expel them. Led by the pigs they decide to run the farm themselves on egalitarian principles. In Course of time the pigs themselves become corrupted by power and a new tyranny is established under their leader Napoleon.
A resounding fable on totalitarianism and power-gone-corrupt, Animal Farm is an allegorical novella that took the publishing world by storm when it was first published and hasn’t stopped doing so ever since. The ultimate satire on fascism, Animal Farm finds relevance even in present-day world. A must-read!
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Eric Arthur Blair (1903-1950), better known by his pen-name, **George Orwell** , was born in India, where his father worked for the Civil Services. An author and journalist, Orwell was one of the most prominent and influential figures in twentieth-century literature. His works spoke out against the social injustice that was prevalent at that time.  His unique political allegory ‘Animal Farm’ was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with the dystopia of ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. His novels and non-fiction include ‘Burmese Days’, ‘Down and Out in Paris and London’, ‘The Road to Wigan Pier’ and ‘Homage to Catalonia’. **
### Recensione
True Agony of a Socialist Orwell is obviously angry at the way Socialism has been distorted by Stalin. Using Animal characters as symbols Orwell honestly mocks and criticizes the Russian leadership under Lenin. It is a very easy to read book giving good perspectives on the Socialist Revolution. –Abhishek Kona Aug 22, 2011
Animal Farm is a satirical allegory on the Russian Revolution. Orwell explains it, It is the history of revolution that went wrong. It tells the simple and tragic story of what happens when the oppressed farm rebel to attain freedom from Mr. Jones. It is about their attempt to rule the farm themselves on the basis of equality. The animals had initially aimed to form a utopian society, where each would work according to his capacity, respecting the needs of the others. But, they failed to do so. And, Animal Farm ended up being a dictatorship of the pigs that were the brightest, but did no physical work in reality. The main action of the story stands for The Russian Revolution of 1917 and the early years of the Soviet Union. Animalism is a metaphor for Communism. Manor farm is an allegory of Russia, Mr. Jones is Russian C-Zar, Old Major stands for Karl Marx, and Snowball represents Leo Trotsky. Napolean stands for Stalin, while the dogs are the secret police. The horse, Boxer stands for the working class which works constantly for the greater good while Squealer is the propagandist. The novel is skillfully organized and presents the horrors of communism through simple story-telling. It presents what propaganda and brain washing do to the people living under the dictatorship. How the fickle minded people were swayed easily by the pigs, who managed to reverse the seven commandments and reduce them to Four legs good, two legs better . I would recommend this book to everyone above 14 years of age who has some knowledge about communism or a hint of what happened during the Russian Revolution of 1917. The book is gripping as there is always something happening. It ends with the pigs becoming mush like humans and changing the name of the farm back to the Manor Farm . The ending was sad it shows how power turns comrades into tyrannical dictators. –Diksha Mahajan Aug 14, 2012
George Orwell is probably one of the few authors who has more than one book featuring regularly in the all the favorites of most people. In such a short book, we get to experience the entire range of the human emotions – probably characterized by the animals. But, what this book basically makes us realize is the fact that politics is relevant at all times. –Deep Agrawal Mar 2, 2012
### Descrizione del libro
Volume 8 of *The Complete Works of George Orwell*

The Adventure of the Final Problem

“The Final Problem” is a short story by British writer Arthur Conan Doyle featuring his detective character Sherlock Holmes. It was first published in Strand Magazine in December 1893. It appears in book form as part of the collection The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Conan Doyle later ranked “The Final Problem” fourth on his personal list of the twelve best Holmes stories. wiki

Adventure of the Devil’s Foot

In recording from time to time some of the curious experiences and interesting recollections which I associate with my long and intimate friendship with Mr. Sherlock Holmes, I have continually been faced by difficulties caused by his own aversion to publicity. To his sombre and cynical spirit all popular applause was always abhorrent, and nothing amused him more at the end of a successful case than to hand over the actual exposure to some orthodox official, and to listen with a mocking smile to the general chorus of misplaced congratulation. It was indeed this attitude upon the part of my friend and certainly not any lack of interesting material which has caused me of late years to lay very few of my records before the public. My participation in some of his adventures was always a privilege which entailed discretion and reticence upon me.

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Complete Brand New Edition “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the second of the twelve Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine in 1892. Miss Susan Cushing of Croydon receives a parcel in the post that contains two severed human ears packed in coarse salt. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard suspects a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their unruly behaviour. The parcel was sent from Belfast, the city of origin of one of the former boarders. Upon examining the parcel himself, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime. He reasons that a medical student with access to a dissection laboratory would likely use something other than plain salt to preserve human remains, and would be able to make a more precise cut than the roughly hacked ears suggest. The address on the package, roughly written and with a spelling correction, suggests to Holmes that the sender lacks education and is unfamiliar with Croydon. The knot in the string suggests to Holmes that they are looking for someone with sailing experience. **
### Sinossi
The Adventure of the Cardboard Box By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Complete Brand New Edition “The Adventure of the Cardboard Box” is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the second of the twelve Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions. The story was first published in the Strand Magazine in 1892. Miss Susan Cushing of Croydon receives a parcel in the post that contains two severed human ears packed in coarse salt. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard suspects a prank by three medical students whom Miss Cushing was forced to evict because of their unruly behaviour. The parcel was sent from Belfast, the city of origin of one of the former boarders. Upon examining the parcel himself, Holmes is convinced that it is evidence of a serious crime. He reasons that a medical student with access to a dissection laboratory would likely use something other than plain salt to preserve human remains, and would be able to make a more precise cut than the roughly hacked ears suggest. The address on the package, roughly written and with a spelling correction, suggests to Holmes that the sender lacks education and is unfamiliar with Croydon. The knot in the string suggests to Holmes that they are looking for someone with sailing experience.