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The Valley of Bones

Anthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic *A Dance to the Music of Time* offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of *Dance* as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books. World War II has finally broken out, and *The Valley of Bones* (1964) finds Nick Jenkins learning the military arts. A stint at a training academy in Wales introduces him to the many unusual characters the army has thrown together, from the ambitious bank clerk-turned-martinet, Gwatkin, to the hopelessly slovenly yet endearing washout, Bithel. Even during wartime, however, domestic life proceeds, as a pregnant Isobel nears her term and her siblings’ romantic lives take unexpected turns—their affairs of the heart lent additional urgency by the ever-darkening shadow of war. “Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”– *Chicago* *Tribune* “A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”–Elizabeth Janeway, *New York* *Times* “One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”–Naomi Bliven, *New Yorker* “The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”–Kingsley Amis

The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic

From the author of the prophetic national bestseller Blowback, a startling look at militarism, American style, and its consequences abroad and at home In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe’s “lone superpower,” then as a “reluctant sheriff,” next as the “indispensable nation,” and now, in the wake of 9/11, as a “New Rome.” Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire.Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism—from George Washington’s farewell address to Dwight Eisenhower’s denunciation of the military-industrial complex—Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America’s expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that supports them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional warriors who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as “secret” everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest. Among Johnson’s provocative conclusions is that American militarism is putting an end to the age of globalization and bankrupting the United States, even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon—with the Pentagon leading the way. Chalmers Johnson is president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, a non-profit research and public affairs organization devoted to public education concerning Japan and international relations in the Pacific. He taught for thirty years, 1962-1992, at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California and held endowed chairs in Asian politics at both of them. At Berkeley he served as chairman of the Center for Chinese Studies and as chairman of the Department of Political Science. His B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics and political science are all from the University of California, Berkeley.He first visited Japan in 1953 as a U.S. Navy officer and has lived and worked there with his wife, the anthropologist Sheila K. Johnson, virtually every year since 1961. Chalmers Johnson has been honored with fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Guggenheim Foundation; and in 1976 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has written numerous articles and reviews and some fifteen books, including Peasant Nationalism and Communist Power on the Chinese revolution, An Instance of Treason on Japan’s most famous spy, Revolutionary Change on the theory of violent protest movements, and MITI and the Japanese Miracle on Japanese economic development. This last-named book laid the foundation for the “revisionist” school of writers on Japan, and because of it the Japanese press dubbed him the “Godfather of revisionism.”He was chairman of the academic advisory committee for the PBS television series “The Pacific Century,” and he played a prominent role in the PBS “Frontline” documentary “Losing the War with Japan.” Both won Emmy awards. His most recent books are, as editor and contributor, Okinawa: Cold War Island; Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire (which won the 2001 American Book Award of the Before Columbus Foundation); and The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic. In the years after the Soviet Union imploded, the United States was described first as the globe’s “lone superpower,” then as a “reluctant sheriff,” next as the “indispensable nation,” and, in the wake of 9/11, as a “New Rome.” Here, Chalmers Johnson thoroughly explores the new militarism that is transforming America and compelling its people to pick up the burden of empire. Reminding us of the classic warnings against militarism—from George Washington’s Farewell Address to Dwight Eisenhower’s denunciation of the military-industrial complex—Johnson uncovers its roots deep in our past. Turning to the present, he maps America’s expanding empire of military bases and the vast web of services that support them. He offers a vivid look at the new caste of professional militarists who have infiltrated multiple branches of government, who classify as “secret” everything they do, and for whom the manipulation of the military budget is of vital interest. Among Johnson’s provocative conclusions is that American militarism is already putting an end to the age of globalization, and bankrupting the United States even as it creates the conditions for a new century of virulent blowback. The Sorrows of Empire suggests that the former American republic has already crossed its Rubicon—with the Pentagon in the lead. “Exhaustive . . . Johnson, an Asia scholar and onetime consultant for the CIA, [produces] voluminous research on the many United States military and intelligence outposts unknown to most Americans, and weaves a frightening picture of a military-industrial complex grown into exactly the powerful, secretive force that Dwight D. Eisenhower warned against—made more dangerous by an aggressive executive branch, creating a state of perpetual war and economic bankruptcy. His assessment is chilling.”—Serge Schmemann, The New York Times Book Review “Exhaustive . . . Johnson, an Asia scholar and onetime consultant for the CIA, [produces] voluminous research on the many United States military and intelligence outposts unknown to most Americans, and weaves a frightening picture of a military-industrial complex grown into exactly the powerful, secretive force that Dwight D. Eisenhower warned against—made more dangerous by an aggressive executive branch, creating a state of perpetual war and economic bankruptcy. His assessment is chilling.”—Serge Schmemann, The New York Times Book Review”Johnson devotes most of his book to examining the numerous foreign bases (which have proliferated since the end of the Cold War), the often legitimate reasons for their initial establishment, the outrages that American servicemen from them perpetrate on their hosts, as well as the comforts and benefits of empire and militarism that prevent their abandonment. Johnson believes that the initial post-Cold War base expansion was aimed at supporting America’s century-old economic imperialism, now called ‘globalization.’ But with the election of the ‘boy emperor’ and the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, ‘the United States shifted decisively from economic to military imperialism,’ which undermined international law and organizations, weakened democracy at home, replaced truth with propaganda, and courted financial ruin. Johnson’s superbly researched book is also an angry book. But who can blame him?”—Walter C. Uhler, San Francisco Chronicle”A scathing and scary indictment of America’s military expansion to all corners of the globe.”—John Wilkens, The San Diego Union-Tribune”[An] enormously useful study.”—Ronald Steel, The Nation”Every page of The Sorrows of Empire0 burns with fierce indignation at the sacrifice of American rights, values, and economic well-being in the name of conquest and empire. Chalmers Johnson has produced a blistering critique of the Bush Administration’s militaristic foreign policy and its dangerous infatuation with high-tec

Sharpe’s Sword

FRANCE’S MOST RUTHLESS ASSASSIN FAILED TO KILL CAPTAIN RICHARD SHARPE ON THE FIRST TRY. WILL HE GET A SECOND CHANCE? Colonel Levroux is killing Britain’s most valuable spies, and it’s up to Richard Sharpe to stop him. Thrust into the unfamiliar world of political and military intrigue, Sharpe must tangle with La Marquesa, a beguiling, extraordinarily beautiful woman whose embrace is as calculating as it is passionate. As she leads him through a maze of secrecy, cunning, and deception, Sharpe relentlessly pursues Leroux, determined to exact his revenge with the cold steel of his sword.

One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War

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In October 1962, at the height of the Cold War, the United States and the Soviet Union appeared to be sliding inexorably toward a nuclear conflict over the placement of missiles in Cuba. Veteran “Washington Post” reporter Michael Dobbs has pored over previously untapped American, Soviet, and Cuban sources to produce the most authoritative book yet on the Cuban missile crisis. In his hour-by-hour chronicle of those near-fatal days, Dobbs reveals some startling new incidents that illustrate how close we came to Armageddon.
Here, for the first time, are gripping accounts of Khrushchev’s plan to destroy the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo; the accidental overflight of the Soviet Union by an American spy plane; the movement of Soviet nuclear warheads around Cuba during the tensest days of the crisis; the activities of CIA agents inside Cuba; and the crash landing of an American F-106 jet with a live nuclear weapon on board.
Dobbs takes us inside the White House and the Kremlin as Kennedy and Khrushchev–rational, intelligent men separated by an ocean of ideological suspicion–agonize over the possibility of war. He shows how these two leaders recognized the terrifying realities of the nuclear age while Castro–never swayed by conventional political considerations–demonstrated the messianic ambition of a man selected by history for a unique mission. As the story unfolds, Dobbs brings us onto the decks of American ships patrolling Cuba; inside sweltering Soviet submarines and missile units as they ready their warheads; and onto the streets of Miami, where anti-Castro exiles plot the dictator’s overthrow.
Based on exhaustive new research and told in breathtaking prose, here is a riveting account of history’s most dangerous hours, full of lessons for our time.

Eight Little Letters: P. S. I Love You

Dedicated to the servicemen and women and their families , who sacrifice so much that we may enjoy our freedom.
When her Navy Seal husband is declared MIA, Faith finds herself holding the eight little letters he had written before he disappeared. Each letter holds the key to a cherished memory of his love (and the feel of his strict hand against her bottom). Hope grows within her as she is reminded to trust in the season of miracles, and she embraces his written promise of a Happy Ever After holiday season.

War Porn

**”One of the best and most disturbing war novels in years.” 
***—The Wall Street Journal
***
“War porn,” *n*. Videos, images, and narratives featuring graphic violence, often brought back from combat zones, viewed voyeuristically or for emotional gratification. Such media are often presented and circulated without context, though they may be used as evidence of war crimes.**

War porn is also, in Roy Scranton’s searing debut novel, a metaphor for the experience of war in the age of the War on Terror, the fracturing and fragmentation of perspective, time, and self that afflicts soldiers and civilians alike, the global networks and face-to-face moments that suture our fragmented lives together. In *War Porn* three lives fit inside one another like nesting dolls: a restless young woman at an end-of-summer barbecue in Utah; an American soldier in occupied Baghdad; and Qasim al-Zabadi, an Iraqi math professor, who faces the US invasion of his country with fear, denial, and perseverance. As *War Porn *cuts from America to Iraq and back again, as home and hell merge, we come to see America through the eyes of the occupied, even as we see Qasim become a prisoner of the occupation. Through the looking glass of *War Porn*, Scranton reveals the fragile humanity that connects Americans and Iraqis, torturers and the tortured, victors and their victims.
**
### Recensione
**Praise for *War Porn***
“Forceful and unsettling.” 
**—Michiko Kakutani, *The New York Times***
“One of the best and most disturbing war novels in years.” 
***—The Wall Street Journal ***
“*War Porn* offers a view of the American military unlike anything else written about Iraq or Afghanistan. The book offers a guided meditation on Iraq certain to force long overdue introspection on how we think about the war, those who fought it and the Americans and Iraqis it affected. Though *War Porn* doesn’t set out to change anyone’s mind, it’s impossible to read it without reconsidering how you think about Iraq and our treatment of those who served.”
**—New Republic **
“To read Scranton is to engage with a powerful intellect.”
**—*Los Angeles Review of Books***
“What impresses is the brutal immediacy of the writing, its authority. Roy Scranton is a truth telling war writer.”
**—E.L. Doctorow, National Book Critics Circle Award-winning author of *Ragtime* and *****The March***
“Roy Scranton’s searingly honest first novel is surreal, ultra-real, and like everything he writes from the heart. This examination of the tragedy of what happened in Iraq reaches out to touch of all us. A brilliant literary achievement.”
**—Jeff VanderMeer, author of the Southern Reach trilogy **
“Powerful, engaging, heartrending, corrosive and unyielding.”
**—Joyce Carol Oates
**”I have never read a book like *War Porn*. Roy Scranton writes with unnerving power. There is much to admire here—the meticulous craftsmanship, the hysterical comic passages, the way the sheer audacity of vision is matched at every turn by the innovative skill to carry it out—but what I’m left with at the end is difficult to put into words. It’s intense and troubling. It’s what all truly excellent literature leaves you with. A sense of something shattering.”
**—Phil Klay, National Book Award-winning author of *Redeployment
***”*War Porn* is dire, savage, and brilliant, a simmering fever-dream of a novel that’s as pure and true in its vision of the long war as anything I’ve read. Roy Scranton is merciless—and why should he be anything but? War’s corruption soaks through every layer of life, and *War Porn* drives home that truth with unflinching, and ultimately harrowing, honesty.”
**—Ben Fountain, author of *Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk
***
“Scranton, a US veteran with an unusually poetic ear, captures the Beckettian banter—as well as trauma—of modern soldiering. *War Porn* rewards repeated reading.”
**—*The Spectator *(UK)**
“In writing *War Porn*, Scranton has produced a literary work that doesn’t just describe the outrages of the war, but punches them into the American gut. *War Porn* contains some of the most significant and original writing on deployment to be found in contemporary American literature about the Iraq War.”
**—The Intercept ** 
**
**”[Scranton] has a real aesthetic skill and is moved by a genuine sympathy for humanity. Roy Scranton’s *War Porn* expresses and helps advance the profound social anger that is emerging amidst the rumble of a society devastated by imperialist war.”
**—World Socialist Web Site**
“Roy Scranton’s *War Porn* is not a book you read once and put away. You read it, think about it, then read it again. Between its covers awaits a fracture in our cultural assumptions about war.”
***—Consequence Magazine***
“Brilliant.”
**—The Rumpus
**”[*War Porn* raises] interesting questions about the nature of those who demand and those who supply. Scranton is a gifted writer .”
**—Electric Literature **
* * *
***”This book is truly unique—true in its fidelity to fact, unique in the depth of its empathy. In prose that rises to aphoristic, coruscating brilliance, Iraq vet Roy Scranton has painted, in words, the equivalent of Goya’s war etchings. A rare and genuine masterpiece.”
**—Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya, author of *The Watch* and *The Storyteller of Marrakesh
***
“A harrowing novel of the Iraq invasion and occupation, *War Porn* exposes the dark heart of that war for all to see. Brilliant and stark, *War Porn *is that rare book that demands to be read out of sheer significance—a stunning accomplishment.”
**—Matt Gallagher, author of *Youngblood***
***
***”Roy Scranton’s four years of service in the U.S. Army lend his work an undeniable authority, but it’s his ability to address multiple sides of the conflict that proves exceptional, coloring his fiction with a rare empathy.”
***—The Village Voice*** 
“[*War Porn* is] a different kind of Iraq War novel, for sure, but it’s not just that. It’s an expression of Scranton’s philosophy about telling new, different stories as a means of survival.”
**—The Millions** ***
* * *
“[A] fierce debut . . . Scranton delivers a poetic sensibility and a staccato writing style, and the result is a no-holds-barred amalgam of plotlines that is especially tragic given all that we now know about the wrenching mess that is today’s Iraq.”
***—Booklist 
***
“Scranton’s provocative debut novel lucidly captures the fractured perspectives of war. Scranton writes with honesty and authority about a complicated clash of weapons, politics, and culture. [*War Porn*] is an unflinching, and sometimes difficult, examination of humanity during wartime.” 
***—Publishers Weekly *** 
“An uncompromising look at the trauma of war.”
***—Library Journal
***
“A kaleidoscopic view of war experience . . . Scranton’s literary skill and fierceness of vision make him a stout antagonist for anyone who wants to take him on.”
**—Time Now**

“Necessary.”
**—scene4 magazine* ***
******
### Sinossi
**”One of the best and most disturbing war novels in years.” 
***—The Wall Street Journal
***
“War porn,” *n*. Videos, images, and narratives featuring graphic violence, often brought back from combat zones, viewed voyeuristically or for emotional gratification. Such media are often presented and circulated without context, though they may be used as evidence of war crimes.**

War porn is also, in Roy Scranton’s searing debut novel, a metaphor for the experience of war in the age of the War on Terror, the fracturing and fragmentation of perspective, time, and self that afflicts soldiers and civilians alike, the global networks and face-to-face moments that suture our fragmented lives together. In *War Porn* three lives fit inside one another like nesting dolls: a restless young woman at an end-of-summer barbecue in Utah; an American soldier in occupied Baghdad; and Qasim al-Zabadi, an Iraqi math professor, who faces the US invasion of his country with fear, denial, and perseverance. As *War Porn *cuts from America to Iraq and back again, as home and hell merge, we come to see America through the eyes of the occupied, even as we see Qasim become a prisoner of the occupation. Through the looking glass of *War Porn*, Scranton reveals the fragile humanity that connects Americans and Iraqis, torturers and the tortured, victors and their victims.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz

The incredible story of the Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist and the woman he loved.Lale Sokolov is well-dressed, a charmer, a ladies’ man. He is also a Jew. On the first transport of men from Slovakia to Auschwitz in 1942, Lale immediately stands out to his fellow prisoners. In the camp, he is looked up to, looked out for, and put to work in the privileged position of Tatowierer the tattooist to mark his fellow prisoners, forever.One of them is a young woman, Gita who steals his heart at first glance. His life given new purpose, Lale does his best through the struggle and suffering to use his position for good.This story, full of beauty and hope, is based on years of interviews author Heather Morris conducted with real-life Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov. It is heart-wrenching, illuminating, and unforgettable.’Morris climbs into the dark miasma of war and emerges with an extraordinary tale of the power of love’ Leah Kaminsky
**Recensie(s)**

a sincere…moving attempt to speak the unspeakable * The Sunday Times * What an extraordinary and important book this is. We need as many memories of the Holocaust as we can retain, and this is a moving and ultimately uplifting story of love, loyalties and friendship amidst the horrors of war. I’m so glad Lale and Gita were eventually able to live long and happy lives together, and thankful that Heather Morris was moved to record their incredible story. It’s a triumph * Jill Mansell * Extraordinary – moving, confronting and uplifting . . . a story about the extremes of human behaviour: calculated brutality alongside impulsive and selfless acts of love. I recommend it unreservedly’ * Graeme Simsion, author of The Rosie Project * Based on the true story of Lale Sokolov, who is forced to tattoo numbers on his fellow concentration camp detainees’ arms. * The Bookseller * Nothing that I could possibly write here would be eloquent enough to convey to you how powerful and moving this book was. I could go on for pages telling you how well this is written, nothing is overdramatized…she just tell this tale that is at its bare bones a love story. I cried entire buckets of tears. Finally I will use the words of Lale If you wake up in the morning, it is a good day that it is. That it is * Netgalley Reviewer * What I loved so much about this book is that it actually made me stop and think; each and every one of those people, regardless of their number or rank within the system or whether they survived or didn’t, had their own story. A quite unexpected story in fact of love, despite the odds, within the concentration camps. What’s so beautiful about this book is not actually that it’s true. Because it is both too beautiful and too ugly to really enjoy reading such an honest first hand account. What struck me the most was how quickly relationships, and very strong friendships almost akin to family, develop when times are so terrible. A hard-hitting, important book with love at it’s core. A brave story shared with an author who delivers it perfectly for one man, and his love affair, who would not be defeated * Netgalley Reviewer * I don’t like reading war time books because they get too depressing or too political. But this one was so different, it gave you hope, that even in the darkest of times if your willpower and faith is strong you can come out successful * Book Ninja * It is one of the rarer stories of the Holocaust, that dares to feature romance in such a place of misery, hopelessness and the dearth of birdsong. Love happened, and the unlikely, nay downright impossible, happened, and this heartfelt book is a very enjoyable presentation of that. * The Bookbag * A beautifully written harrowing story of one man’s will to survive in Auschwitz…it is a story of hope and endurance and a beauty that emerges when all around is painted in black. As a reader you cannot help but be affected by this account the simplicity of the story telling only adds to the poignancy… * Library Thing * This is an outstanding read…An extremely powerful and absorbing read that had me in tears at the most surprising moments and it will be making an appearance in my Top Ten of 2017. It is due to be published in January 2018 and I hand on heart urge everyone to read it. * Batty About Books * Though very hard to read in places, this story is full of hope, love, courage and kindness. It made me cry a lot, but in places it also made me smile, as it shows humanity at its best in the worst of times. Lale had nothing but positivity and determination and, along with Gita and many of the other prisoners, is one of the bravest people you will ever read about. This review doesn’t come close to doing The Tattooist of Auschwitz justice. It’s such a heartbreaking, beautiful story and one I’m so glad Lale got to tell * Foreword Books * The Tattooist of Auschwitz is a very moving book, showing the survival of humanity in a brutal place. I love this story * The Reading Life * Lale Sokolov’s story not only moving and heart-breaking, but also humbling and inspiring hope. I was so totally blown away by this book that I am really struggling to find words for the emotions it evoked in me. In her writing, Morris manages to convey the spirit of a young man trying to survive, but also hold on to his humanity the best he can. It was heart-breaking and humbling to see the strength of the human spirit in the face of death. What an amazing man. What an amazing story. Everyone should read this unforgettable book * But Books Are Better * I don’t think I’ve ever felt happier about a love story than now. I really admired Lale from the very start of this novel, his positivity and his determination to survive shine through from the very beginning and it was wonderful to see how he tries to give Gita hope when she sees none. Heather Morris did a brilliant job writing Lale’s personal story, and even though it was a very compelling testimony and there were still many sad moments to get through, the overruling feeling after I finished it is one of warmth and contentment for these two individuals. Lale and Gita’s love story was a perfect counterweight for the predominant harshness of this novel. * The Belgian Reviewer * I absolutely loved this book and thought it was a powerful and emotional story of survival in such an awful time. Lale is such a wonderful, amazing man who uses his power as the tattooist to help others, he is truly an amazing man…This story is such an emotional one that I found myself really pacing through this book, I found it so difficult to put down. It was beautiful and inspiring and I hope others pick up this book when it is released next year. I highly recommend this * Life and Tea * This was such an emotional read, so many highs of Lale and Gita and then so many lows of friends lost along the way * Lozzi Book Reviews * I’ve always held a deep respect for books that remind us how terribly bad human nature can be if left unbridled, so it went without question that this book was a must-read. I very much enjoyed reading this, and I envy the author for the precious hours she was able to spend with such a forgiving, peaceful human being. It would be an honor to have met Lale Sokolov * Slightly Cracked Belle * ‘Lale did what had to be done to survive, but he also boosted morale and saved inestimable lives by appropriating food and medical supplies from right under the noses of the SS Death’s Head Units. He was naturally empathetic, well liked by his fellow prisoners and held out to the end with his dignity and integrity unblemished. More amazingly, perhaps, is that he developed a deep and enduring love for a women he had branded upon entering the camp. The Tattooist of Auschwitz is the remarkable, percipient, utterly unforgettable novel based on Lale’s experiences as camp tatowierer * Book Jotter * Even when we think we’ve heard enough we will never be free of the stories of the Holocaust and we shouldn’t be. As long as there is ink and paper the stories need to be told because there is always one we haven’t heard. The Tattooist of Auschwitz was one of those for me…we know at the outset they survive but it’s in the how that keeps us riveted and shaking our heads in amazement at the courage, the determination to survive and the love these two have for each other * WeeSied * The Tattooist of Auschwitz is a very powerful and emotional read. At times it is overwhelmingly harrowing, yet at the same time there is always a hint of hope. * Little Miss No Sleep * one of the most life-affirming, courageous, unforgettable and human stories of the Holocaust: the love story of the tattooist of Auschwitz. * The Book Trail * The Tattooist of Auschwitz, is a tale that will live long in the minds of its readers.Morris weaves Lale’s story into a mesmerising fictional narrative, that at times leaves the reader astonished not purely by what Lale witnesses and experiences, but the determination and resolve of this man. It is both a terrific oxymoron and a testimony of the triumph of love that the human capacity for affection and compassion can reveal itself in such an horrific setting, but it is also testament to these two individuals that they can foster love in the darkest of moments. This is a book whose story – not least because it is based on true events – couldn’t fail to affect me. I longed for Lale and Gita’s happiness and future, but I was also haunted by all those who didn’t achieve either. For me, reading this book was a pleasure, a lesson and a reminder; I would recommend it to all readers. * Nudge Books, Bookhugger review 5/5* * I couldn’t put this book down. Despite the horrors within its pages, this is also a tale of love, friendships, and hope. It’s a story that made me stop and think about the individual stories of other prisoners in these camps, what they had to do to stay alive and who they lost along the way. Stories that we will never know but that we should never forget existed. This is a short novel but it packs a huge punch; the combination of Heather Morris’ storytelling and Lale’s unforgettable true story make this book impossible to put down. * Strupag book blog * The story broke my heart over and over, but also gave me hope. Out of something so awful, the love between Lale and Gita was born and managed to withstand and survive. It’s something you need to read to believe because the tale is like something out of a movie. Of course, I gave this 5 stars. It is beautifully written and tells an incredible story that needed to be told. * Chloe Metzger * Somehow both Lale and Gita survive – this isn’t a spoiler, this is a true story and so we know at the outset they survive but it’s in the how that keeps us riveted and shaking our heads in amazement at the courage, the determination to survive and the love these two have for each other. I can only imagine a person could only survive if there was cunning and courage and caring involved. * Denice’s Day * This is an important period in history, one that should never be forgotten or taken lightly. Heather has done a wonderful job in relating Lala’s story. It is an emotional journey, and even now I still feel the emotion as I write this review, a few days after reading the book. * Me and My Books * This is not a comfortable read and nor should it be. What the Jews and other minority groups suffered at the hands of the Nazi’s is something the world should never forget. The fact that this is a true story makes it all the more horrific, yet it has glimmers of hope and humour and ultimately love. * My Bookish Blogspot * Despite how much this book broke my heart, it also reassured me that things weren’t all bad for all of the people stuck in concentration camps, & that some were able to find happiness in small doses. * Writing Wolves * I really did appreciate it was inspired by the true events of a couple; both humbling and heartbreaking, I was captivated by their love story. I felt like this point of view was incredibly original. Lale was not just a typical prisoner of Auschwitz concentration camp- he was the tattooist. I have never read any WWII fiction with this type of perspective and I was in awe of the atrocities he experienced were explained. The lengths that Lale goes through to protect Gita were astonishing and their will to survive was fascinating. * Clues and Reviews * This is definitely a book that will stay with me for a very long time. It also needs to be shared far and wide, to be read by all ages and all peoples, so that would happened is never forgotten, so that it never happens again. * Secret Library Book Blog * Out of one of the worst periods of human history comes an inspirational story of love, hope and survival… a beacon of light amidst the dark ruins of the Holocaust.Lale’s harrowing but unforgettable story is one of beauty and brutality, life and death, humanity and inhumanity, but through it all the flame of hope never dies. It is the beacon that sees him through the very worst of times and gives light to the rest of his days. An extraordinary story of an extraordinary love… * Lancashire Evening Post * The story, the tale of Lale and Gita is so memorable * Much Ado About Books * This book is unmissable. It’s a readable, sensitive, morally complicated and engrossing story * Those Precious Stolen Moments * The Tattooist of Auschwitz is a story of love against all the odds. It is beautifully written, desperately sad and at the same time triumphant. A must read WW2 novel * The Welsh Librarian * Would I recommend this story? A million times yes! This is a story that not only needs to be read, but it’s one that we can not afford to forget. It is moving, emotional, gritty, and most importantly, real * Minimac Reviews * A fascinating insight in the life at Auschwitz and how the main character manages to survive by having given the task of tattooing the numbers on the arms of the prisoners of Auschwitz. You probably won’t keep your eyes dry with this one! I can highly recommend The Tattooist Of Auschwitz to any fan of the genre * It’s All About Books * This is a debut novel by Heather Morris, it is a true account of Lale Sokolov’s time in Auschwitz. It’s a harrowing read of the treatment the prisoners endured. This was a brutal and chilling read but also very emotive…this was sensitively written and compelling, I sometimes had step back for a moment to remind myself that this really happened and everything I was reading was a devastating and cruel reality. This is definitely a book that I recommend you pick up in 2018… * Louise Loves Books * The fact that this is a true story makes it all the more horrific, yet it has glimmers of hope and humour and ultimately love * My Bookish Blog Spot * I really did appreciate it was inspired by the true events of a couple; both humbling and heartbreaking, I was captivated by their love story * Clues and Reviews * Despite the ugliness and the gut wrenching setting there is beauty in this book, the resilience that Lale finds deep in himself, his courage and above all his strength of character shine through, as does his love for Gita. The author has done an incredible job of retelling Lale and his Gita’s story, at times I felt I was there alongside him, I felt his despair, his pain and those moments when it would have been easier to have given up than live another day. I found the end of the book very emotional as the reader learns what happened to Lale and Gita in the years after Auschwitz. This is one book that will haunt me for a long time to come, but I think it’s a book everyone should read. Highly recommended * The Book Review Cafe * It is a story full of horror but of hope and the strength of human spirit in the face of adversity and Lale and Gita were such an admirable, brave couple and I’m glad I got to read their story, as many stories were unable to be told * Books And Me * It is a story full of horror but of hope and the strength of human spirit in the face of adversity and Lale and Gita were such an admirable, brave couple and I’m glad I got to read their story, as many stories were unable to be told * Bookkaz * I fell just a bit more in love with Lale the more I read. * Sissi Reads * A powerful and deeply moving story of survival and also a remarkable love story * The Last Word * The Tattooist of Auschwitz is very much a story of survival. The Tattooist of Auschwitz isn’t just about how Lale met and fell in love with Gita, but also about how courage, pride and stubbornness ensured they survived. It’s beautifully written as fiction, even though it’s a true story. I would say it’s an ‘easy read’ but it’s certainly not, due to the subject matter – instead, it’s difficult and disturbing at times. This is an emotional book about the importance of hope and is thought provoking and inspiring. Lale and Gita’s story will stay with me forever. * Off The Shelf Books * This is in my opinion another book that should be read in schools to teach about the Holocaust and how it affected the people then and how it should teach us lessons for the future. The survivors and those that lost their lives deserve for their stories to live on. One last thing I need to say, have the tissues at hand and be prepared to read late into the night and have this book take over your mind and thoughts from the very beginnin
to the very end. * Jeanz Book Read and Review * Lale’s harrowing but unforgettable story is one of beauty and brutality, life and death, humanity and inhumanity, but through it all the flame of hope never dies. It is the beacon that sees him through the very worst of times and gives light to the rest of his days. An extraordinary story of an extraordinary love… * Chorley Guardian * My words here will never do justice to such an important subject. All I can do is to just ask you to read it for yourself. Lale’s story will stay with me and those who have read The Tattooist of Auschwitz. The Tattooist of Auschwitz is a powerful and deeply moving story of survival and also a remarkable love story. Both Lale and Gita’s story will stay with me forever as these stories must be told for future generations to understand and to learn. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. * The Last Word Book Review * The romance and love between Gita and Lale was heartbreaking and heartwarming in equal measures and proves that the human spirit can’t be crushed by evil and that despite the horrors they witnessed and the violence they experienced during their 3 years at Auschwitz, they were able to help and provide comfort for many others. This book really needs to be read by EVERYONE as it’s a wonderful reminder of survival, hope and love. * Compulsive Readers * Morris’s sensitive and humane writing includes recognisable key events that have been covered in other stories about the Holocaust, anchoring the authenticity of Lale’s tale, and here they resonate afresh as the devastating emotional impact of each event is renewed through his perspective. The Tattooist of Auschwitz features more than one story of courage under horrific conditions, this is a story that gives voice to the millions of lives that were lost. * Pam Reader * It tells an incredibly powerful story that so many people had to live through. It shows that even in such an awful circumstance, people can still put others before themselves. * Geeking Ginger * This story, full of beauty and hope, is based on years of interviews author Heather Morris conducted with real-life Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov. It is heart-wrenching, illuminating, and unforgettable. * Boovers * The Tattooist of Auschwitz is a very powerful and emotional read. This is a very emotive story of love and friendship in the most unlikely of places. I couldn’t put this book down and ended up reading it in one three hour sitting last night. I had tears in my eyes while reading this, and by the time I reached the Author’s Note and additional information I was properly crying. * Little Miss No Sleep * Hats off to the author who has been able to listen to so much pain from the mouth of the real Lale and has so much skill to make this book an incredible story, who kidnaps from the first line and intrudes overwhelmingly into our daily life, forcing us to continue to know what it will happen, what will happen to Lale and Gita. A story of impact, shocking and proving that true love can overcome any storm, any atrocity. There is always something more powerful than evil and bad. * The Shelter of Books * He was so brave and many people survived thanks to him. I’m so glad this book exists and I hope a lot of people read it. Never forget * A Song of Book and Coffee * One of the most life affirming, courageous, unforgettable and human stories of the Holocaust: the love story of The Tattooist of Auschwitz * The Hunt Post * A moving true love story that also solves a historical puzzle about the tattooist’s identity * Church Times * This is an important story and I am glad that Lale got the chance to tell it. It offers a unique perspective of the war that I hadn’t encountered before * Noctua Review * Heather has done a wonderful job in relating Lale’s story. It is an emotional journey, and even now I still feel the emotion as I write this review, a few days after reading the book * Vonnibee * This story, full of beauty and hope, is based on years of interviews author Heather Morris conducted with real-life Holocaust survivor and Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov. It is heart-wrenching, illuminating, and unforgettable * Dressed To Read * This is a hugely involved and involving story of love in an impossible place…an inspiring story * Waterford Today * the stories of survivors need to be told, without them there is more chance we will repeat the past. Morris does that in a sensitive way, and she brings a little lightness to a very dark story. * MMCheryl * I am honestly finding it difficult to put into words how heart wrenching this book was. I generally would like to thank Lale Soklov for letting Heather Morris share his story of how he fought for his survival and for the one he loved. * Hannah Reads * Stories of the Holocaust will always be harrowing and shocking no matter how many have gone before, but the character of Lale Sokolov makes this one uniquely romantic, life-affirming and even funny in places. * The Literary Sofa * The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris was very bit as harrowing as I expected, and I could not put it down. It tells the true story of Lale Sokolov, a Jewish prisoner who had a secret love affair within the walls of the concentration camp. It’s a beautiful, shocking, upsetting and uplifting story; I thoroughly recommend reading it * Panziereads * It took three years of thrice-weekly meetings between Lale Eisenberg and Heather Morris for the author to gain the survivor’s trust. For that alone, readers should be indebted to Morris: Lale was a man of Herculean moral strength, and his Odyssean story of humanity, survival and eventual reunion with Gita, deserves a wide audience * Jewish Chronicle * I honestly didn’t realise how emotionally invested in this book I was until I put it down and had tears streaming down my face. Whether you have an interest in WW2 fiction or not, this is a book you must add to your list because the love story shared between Lale and Gita is one that deserves to be read – and Heather Morris has done a beautiful job at crafting it * Louise Hudson * a touching and redemptive tale of love and selflessness * Times Literary Supplement * a beautiful story of survival and ultimate redemption * Sunday World, Eire * Haunting and unforgettable. 5/5 * Read Like Me * What is striking about Heather Morris’ new book, based on the powerful and true story of Lale Sokolov, and focusing on his experience in the most appalling of the Nazi camps, is how very readable it is…That Lale and Gita both survived, and found each other, is miraculous. The close bond forged between author and protagonist in the three years preceding the latter’s death in 2006 provides the text with the authenticity of a memoir. This is a remarkable achievement * The Tablet * Grim and distressing yet it shows, like Schindler’s List, the power of humanity’s bravery and compassion * Nudge Book * Despite the subject matter, I found this a very easy read. It’s the true story of Lale Sokolov – how he survived the horrors of Auschwitz and found love along the way * This West London Life * Finding out Lale was not just a brave character in a book but a real life person made me smile. His tenacity, charm, intelligence and wit not only saved himself and Gita but hundreds of starving, beaten prisoners in the camp * Brunching Bookworm * It’s a story that shows that even in the darkest of places good things can happen and, as cliched as this sounds, love can conquer all * Reading Matters * The Tattooist of Auschwitz shows true human bravery. It emphasises the need for small acts of human kindness. It gives you the incentive to see the good in every day despite the struggles we each face * Basic Gonzo * This was one of the most moving, haunting and uplifting stories I have ever read * Busy Raising Wild Things *
(source: Bol.com)

Retribution

By the summer of 1944 it was clear that Japan’s defeat was inevitable, but how the drive to victory would be achieved remained unclear. The ensuing drama—that ended in Japan’s utter devastation—was acted out across the vast theater of Asia in massive clashes between army, air, and naval forces.
In recounting these extraordinary events, Max Hastings draws incisive portraits of MacArthur, Mao, Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, and other key figures of the war in the East. But he is equally adept in his portrayals of the ordinary soldiers and sailors caught in the bloodiest of campaigns.
With its piercing and convincing analysis, **Retribution** is a brilliant telling of an epic conflict from a master military historian at the height of his powers.
*From the Trade Paperback edition.*

The Lotus Eaters

A unique and sweeping debut novel of an American female combat photographer in the Vietnam War, as she captures the wrenching chaos and finds herself torn between the love of two men.
On a stifling day in 1975, the North Vietnamese army is poised to roll into Saigon. As the fall of the city begins, two lovers make their way through the streets to escape to a new life. Helen Adams, an American photojournalist, must take leave of a war she is addicted to and a devastated country she has come to love. Linh, the Vietnamese man who loves her, must grapple with his own conflicted loyalties of heart and homeland. As they race to leave, they play out a drama of devotion and betrayal that spins them back through twelve war-torn years, beginning in the splendor of Angkor Wat, with their mentor, larger-than-life war correspondent Sam Darrow, once Helen’s infuriating love and fiercest competitor, and Linh’s secret keeper, boss and truest friend.
Tatjana Soli paints a searing portrait of an American woman’s struggle and triumph in Vietnam, a stirring canvas contrasting the wrenching horror of war and the treacherous narcotic of obsession with the redemptive power of love. Readers will be transfixed by this stunning novel of passion, duty and ambition among the ruins of war.

The Invisible Bridge

LONGLISTED FOR THE ORANGE PRIZE FOR FICTION

Paris, 1937. Andras L�vi, an architecture student, has arrived from Budapest with a scholarship, a single suitcase, and a mysterious letter he has promised to deliver to Clara Morgenstern a young widow living in the city. When Andras meets Clara he is drawn deeply into her extraordinary and secret life, just as Europe’s unfolding tragedy sends them both into a state of terrifying uncertainty.

From a remote Hungarian village to the grand opera houses of Budapest and Paris, from the despair of Carpathian winter to an unimaginable life in forced labour camps and beyond, The Invisible Bridge tells the story of a marriage tested by disaster and of a family, threatened with annihilation, bound by love and history.
**Recensie(s)**

Old-fashioned in the best possible way: a big, generously involving story, utterly convincing in its texture and detail. Beautiful and sad * Metro * Compelling, passionate, tragic * Marie Claire * Powerful and affecting, crowded with the details of lives led and miseries inflicted * Sunday Times * There are characters whose fate we care about, and a profoundly moving love story threaded between the tenacity of family and the monstrous grind of war. One that cries for you to linger over page by enthralling page — Simon Schama * Financial Times * Gripping, moving * TLS * Stunning, gracefully written, altogether remarkable * LA Times * A sweeping epic, a good old-fashioned page-turner * Daily Mail *
(source: Bol.com)

Hornet Flight

Hornet Flight by Ken Follett
Ken Follett—the master of suspense—follows his bestsellers *Jackdaws* and *Code to Zero* with an extraordinary novel of the early days of World War II.
It is June 1941 and the war is not going well for England. Somehow, the Germans are anticipating the RAF’s flight paths, and shooting down British bombers with impunity. Hermia Mount, an intelligence analyst with MI6, wonders if the Germans could have perfected a radar system like the one the British themselves are struggling to achieve-but that notion itself is shot down, by her own bosses. Preposterous, she is told; stick with what she knows. But, still, she wonders.
Across the North Sea, eighteen-year-old Harald Olufsen takes a shortcut across the German-occupied Danish island of Fano on his homemade motorcycle, and comes across an astonishing sight. He doesn’t know what it is, but he knows he must tell someone.
In Copenhagen, police detective and collaborator Peter Flemming searches his list of known troublemakers. The Germans are determined to discover who is smuggling information, and an idea has just come to him. This could even mean a promotion….
In the weeks to come, their lives and the lives of those close to them will intertwine, and for Harald in particular, it will be a time of trial. For when he finally learns the truth, it will all fall upon him to deliver the word to England-except that he has no way to get there. He has only an old derelict Hornet Moth biplane rusting away in the nave of a ruined church: a plane so decrepit that it is unlikely ever to get off the ground . . . even if Harald knew how to fly it.
Filled with knife-edge suspense and rich, tantalizing characters, this is Ken Follett writing at the top of his form-unforgettable storytelling from an unforgettable writer.
Author Biography: Ken Follett is the author of fifteen novels, including most recently the *New York Times* bestsellers *Jackdaws* and *Code to Zero*.

Breaking Point

While struggling to recover from a shattered personal life, Net Force Commander Alex Michaels races against time to find the culprits responsible for stealing plans to a top-secret atmospheric weapon that uses low-frequency wave generation to drive people mad. Original.

The Book Thief

It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau.This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.From the Hardcover edition.